Press Corporation Limited (PCL.mw) 2011 Annual Report

first_imgPress Corporation Limited (PCL.mw) listed on the Malawi Stock Exchange under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2011 annual report.For more information about Press Corporation Limited (PCL.mw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Press Corporation Limited (PCL.mw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Press Corporation Limited (PCL.mw)  2011 annual report.Company ProfilePress Corporation Limited is the largest holding company in Malawi; with vested interests in real estate, energy, food and beverages, consumer goods, financial services and telecommunications. The highly diversified company has stakes in 13 companies in Malawi made up of 8 subsidiaries, 4 joint ventures and one associate. Well-known brands in its portfolio include: National Bank of Malawi in the financial services sector, Malawi Telecommunications Limited and Telekom Networks Limited in the telecommunication sector, Ethanol Company Limited and Presscane Limited in the energy sector, People’s Trading Centre Limited in the consumer goods sector, Press Properties Limited and Manzini Limited in the property investment and development sector, and The Foods Company in the food manufacturing sector. Press Corporation Limited is listed on the Malawi Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Violence at churches is rare, but ministers remain vigilant

first_img Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal News Service] Standing at the window in her church office, Roberta Karstetter watched the angry man circle the building, checking every door as he looked for a way inside.She had just refused to let him into the offices of Christ Episcopal Church in Delavan, Wisconsin, where she is the parish administrator.“I spoke to him through the glass doors and I just had an uneasy feeling about him, so I wouldn’t unlock the door,” she told ENS in a recent interview. He said he needed help, but he wouldn’t say what kind of help.“He got really belligerent and angry,” Karstetter recalled. He opened his coat, saying, “I don’t have a gun or anything, just let me in.” He began rattling the door.Karstetter decided to walk away and go back upstairs to her office, where she watched the man test every door to get inside.After she was sure he had left, she got in her car and went home, a decision she said she rarely makes.“It just scared me to think what if I let him in,” she said. “I wonder what he did want.”It wasn’t the first time Karstetter had encountered someone at the church who worried her, and it wasn’t the last. For instance, there was the woman who got angry when Karstetter offered her food instead of the money she demanded. The woman drove off, swearing and threatening to burn down the church. Karstetter reported the incident to the police.“She has since been back, just a few weeks ago, asking for assistance again and we told her we’d give her food and not cash, and she said that takes too long,” Karstetter said. “She turned around and walked out mad again, but she didn’t threaten to burn down the church this time.”Those incidents – and others – don’t prevent Karstetter from doing what she’s been doing in one form or another at St. Peter’s for the last 28 years: working at a parish that participates in a church-based rotating homeless shelter and offers a food pantry to supplement a larger community one.“Part of the reason I keep coming back is that 95 percent or more of the people that come here for help are not a physical threat or danger to us at all. It’s just that small percent that get you scared,” she said. “The reason I come back is because you’ve got to love your neighbor as yourself, you know. It’s about the love and compassion that I think God puts in our hearts and part of the Baptismal Covenant that says is to seek and serve Christ in all people and to respect the dignity of every human being. If we treated everybody that came – those 95 percent – as a threat, what kind of message does that give them about the church being open and loving and welcoming to them?”The question of balancing the church’s ministry with the safety of its ministers has been on many people’s mind, once again, since Douglas Franklin Jones, a homeless man, shot church administrative assistant Brenda Brewington and co-rector the Rev. Dr. Mary-Marguerite Kohn inside St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Ellicott City, Maryland, before killing himself earlier this month.Speaking to reporters outside of Kohn’s funeral, Diocese of Maryland Bishop Eugene Sutton said the mourners also remembered “all who are on the front lines of ministry. These are the administrators, the secretaries, those priests who are alone” as their congregation’s sole employee.Sutton also called attention to “a society that’s still has not figured out a way to keep deadly arms out of distressed persons who can do so much harm, and a society that will have people on the streets whom society at large has not cared for, and they end up at the doorsteps of our churches and our churches welcome them — our churches receive them and help them in the name of Christ.”Craig Stuart-Paul, St. Peter’s warden, pledged days after the shootings that the parish’s ministry would continue, “and we won’t do it from behind bulletproof glass.”To that end, the parish recently rededicated itself to its ministry, pledging to “transform” the office where the two women were killed “into an environment that welcomes all people to the church, and provides safety for those who will work there.” The parish also vowed to “reach out in search of the best ideas on how a church may minister to the poor and needy in suburban America” and to work with all of Ellicott City’s faith communities “to provide a hand up to the poor and needy in our neighborhood, developing a plan that is seeded with knowledge and broad community support.”The Rev. Susan Rebecca Michelfelder, currently interim rector at Christ Church in Middletown, New Jersey, told her congregation in a recent sermon that the shooting had left her “truly bereft.”Michelfelder has spent much her in ministry, as she puts it, “in neighborhoods with problems.” She’s been the victim of “smash and grab” crimes while in her car on the way to church. She’s had to warn employees to lock up their valuables or expect them to be stolen by the people the congregation served. She’s worked in a congregation whose pastor wore a bulletproof vest for a time after a mentally ill man burst into the church during a service and threatened to shoot him. A woman once asked her, “what do I have to do, stab you?” when Michelfelder refused to give her money.“Maybe I’m addicted to excitement or something, but I like to be in neighborhoods with problems because there the church can really make a difference and a difference is needed,” she told ENS.The Maryland parish is very much like her current parish in suburban New Jersey.“It could have been us just as easily, absolutely,” she said. Noting that the parish helps run the Calico Cat Thrift Store, Cupboard and Pantry next door to the church, Michelfelder said, “we get scary characters walking in here sometimes, too.”“It is truly a wonder that more of us haven’t been killed in the church office because that is often where people first come for help,” she said during the sermon.There are steps that church workers, and their employers, can take to reduce the chances that an encounter with an unbalanced person will end in tragedy. Some are personal safety choices such as having a can of mace or pepper spray  — or in Karstetter’s case, wasp spray — handy. Some workers resist the temptation to come back to work in the evening to catch up, if it means working alone in the building.Other steps are more institutional: installing adequate lighting, strong locks, video cameras, door bells on doors that are always locked, alarm systems or panic buttons; hiring security guards; and having a code word or phrase for staff to use with each other that indicate help is needed.Security experts suggest limiting the access of non-employees to only certain parts of the building, and knowing who is in the building at all times. Training in how to de-escalate a potentially violent situation is another common suggestion, as is sharing information with colleagues at their church and others in the community about people they encounter.Getting to know the people you serve is crucial, according to Sean Leas, an ex-Marine who is now the property manager at St. James Episcopal Church in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. What he and his colleagues have learned with “even our hardest cases, the ones who may be more of the criminal mind” among the 120 or so people who come to the parish’s weekday Anchorage breakfast program is the power of greeting each one, and wishing them well when they leave.“Eventually with most of them you get to the point where they’re saying ‘hi’ and ‘bye,’ which is what you want,” he told ENS in an interview. “You want them to know that you see them, that you respect them.”Lease said it is a “good investment to know the people who frequent our streets and may come into church,” yet in the end “our main thing isn’t to ask questions; it’s to feed them, and provide a safe place for everybody to eat.”St. James keeps the doors to its offices locked, Leas said. The 10 to 12 paid and volunteer staff members who are in the building “try not to open the door to people unless we know them,” he said, adding, “we’re pretty loose with that and trusting.”The parish hired a security guard nine years ago after “there were a couple run-ins with parishioners and some of the breakfast guests giving the parishioners a hard time” and “we know there was drug dealing and different things going on,” he said.The degree to which any or all of these steps are needed and fit a particular church’s situation depends in part, Michelfelder said, on “how secure [the ministers] feel in general, how empowered they feel” to manage their own situation. That includes knowing and deciding to accept the risks.“We know the church office is not a safe place,” she said. “We just know this. If you can’t live with that, you maybe shouldn’t work here.”Deb Weber, the secretary at Christ Church, Delavan, is a case in point. As a former police officer who works part time at the Episcopal church, part time at Delavan United Methodist Church and runs the emergency shelter, Watson said she doesn’t feel very scared really, “but there are times I do feel uncomfortable.”“If we let fear drive our ministry, we aren’t being very good about persevering against evil,” Karstetter said as Weber murmured agreement. “That fear is the evil that if we let get a foothold, we wouldn’t do any ministry.”The church, Weber said, has a mission among people who might be frightful. “So many of the people we come in contact with, this is the only love they’ve ever seen,” she said.That knowledge, and a good dose of empathy, help both Weber and Karstetter. “They work up the courage to come and ask for help, and then you treat them like they’re horrible, scary people? You can’t do that with everybody,” Karstetter said. “Even the people that sometimes you’re afraid of, we still need to respect their dignity even though they have substance-abuse problems and everything else. We still try to love them as Christ loved us.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (2) Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rachel Quinn says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ June 1, 2012 at 10:46 am Good article……………as a police officer it’s hard to balance loving all like Christ and being “sceptical”of some,even in church , we do the best we can………………and pray were doing the right thing…….again, good article……………….God bless our pastors and those working in the church………….. Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img May 23, 2012 at 6:35 pm Dale D. Regan, the head of Episcopal School in Jacksonville, Florida, was shot and killed March 6 by an ex-employee. That’s three workers shot and killed in less than two months. I wish the Standing Committee on Justice would draft some kind of resolution regarding gun violence at General Convention, or even go as far as supporting gun control. Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 18, 2012 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. Violence at churches is rare, but ministers remain vigilant Church workers know they are ‘on the front lines’ Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC michael Neal says: Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

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Colombia: La Iglesia se une a las personas internamente desplazadas

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Soacha es hogar de más de 45.000 personas internamente desplazadas. LA Diócesis Episcopal de Colombia tiene una iglesia en Soacha que proporciona espacio y ayuda a una cooperativa de mujeres. Foto: Lynette Wilson /ENS[Episcopal News Service  – Bogotá, Colombia] Semanalmente de dos a tres familias que buscan refugio llegan al Barrio Los Libertadores, una comunidad de bajos ingresos en las afueras de la capital de Colombia, Bogotá.“Algunas personas tienen que huir de sus hogares y sus tierras por temor a sus vidas”, dijo el Rdo. José Antonio Romero, refiriéndose a las personas internamente desplazadas que buscan refugio en su iglesia “Ellos tenían granjas, negocios, pero a causa de la guerra, ellos se van sin nada”.Las familiar llegan a la estación de autobuses en Los Libertadores,  de todas partes de Colombia, un país con casi el doble del tamaño de Texas con una geografía agreste de montañas, selva y llanuras tropicales. Ellos encuentran Divino Salvador mediante personas que les avisan sobre esta.La Misión de Divino Salvador en el Barrio Los Libertadores, una comunidad de bajos ingresos en las afueras de la capital de Colombia,  Bogotá, dirige un refugio para desplazados internos [IDPs]. Foto: Lynette Wilson /ENSLa Misión de Divino Salvador en el Barrio Los Libertadores, una comunidad de bajos ingresos en las afueras de la capital de Colombia, Bogotá, dirige un refugio para desplazados internos [IDPs]. Foto: Lynette Wilson /ENSLa parroquia se inició hace 20 años con una capilla, que hora es el sótano de un edificio de cuatro pisos que tiene una cocina, un refugio, un santuario y un apartamento en la planta superior, donde Romero ha vivido por 16 años desde que llegó a Divino Salvador.Para las familias que vienen a la ciudad en busca de seguridad y empleo, la iglesia les proporciona vivienda temporal, alimentos, medicina y ropas con el apoyo financiero que Romero recauda mediante amigos, mientras las familias aplican para obtener ayuda del gobierno.El Rdo. José Antonio Romero explica que semanalmente dos o tres familias llegan buscando refugio en Divino Salvador. Foto: Lynette Wilson /ENSAún para esas familias el gobierno determina que tienen demandas legítimas de desplazamiento– y las cuales reciben compensación a veces por terreno, otras veces por vivienda – los 4.7 millones de personas desplazadas en Colombia tienen aún dificultades para encontrar empleo, seguridad y a menudo son el blanco de discriminación. Más de medio millón de personas se han convertido en  refugiados.Desde mediados de la década de 1960, las fuerzas del gobierno, las guerrillas de la izquierda y paramilitares de la derecha han estado peleando una Guerra civil enraizada en la desigualdad que ha asesinado a más de 200,000 colombianos.  El gobierno Colombiano y el grupo guerrillero más grande, las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de  Colombia, o FARC, han participado en conversaciones sobre la paz en la Habana, Cuba, desde el 2012. Se especula que en la segunda vuelta electoral presidencial del país del 15 de junio se determinará si continúan o no las conversaciones de paz– se ha llegado a un acuerdo con respecto a tres de los cinco puntos de la agenda –.La lucha y la violencia asociadas con el crimen organizado, el tráfico de drogas, la distribución de la tierra, y la extracción  de los recursos humanos en los últimos años han afectado de manera desproporcionada a las zonas rurales, donde el 44 por ciento de la población vive en la pobreza. La violencia obliga a las personas que viven en las zonas rurales a buscar seguridad en ciudades.Situado en un altiplano en los Andes, Bogotá está rodado por estas comunidades informales que son pobladas por personas internamente desplazadas; lugares como San Cristobal donde se encuentra ubicado Los Libertadores, Suba, Ciudad Bolivar, y Soacha, donde la Misión Espíritu Santo proporciona espacio para la Mesa de Organizaciones de Mujeres de Soacha, una cooperativa sobre los derechos de las mujeres y apoderamiento, apoyado por la Organización Mundial de la Salud.Soacha, una zona industrial de clase trabajadora  40 minutos al sudeste de la capital, y con una población de 490,000, es hogar de más de 45.000 personas desplazadas.“Todos los problemas, como el tráfico de drogas, pandillas juveniles se reúnen aquí, dijo el Rdo. Carlos Eduardo Guevara, sacerdote que sirve en la Iglesia Espíritu Santo.Las personas internamente desplazadas viven en casas construidas en las laderas y son susceptibles a deslizamientos de tierra, como estas en Soacha. Bogotá, la capital de Colombia está rodeada de dichas comunidades informales. Foto: Lynette Wilson /ENSAdemás de los peligros de la vida cotidiana en Soacha, donde las madres viven con el temor de que sus hijos sean reclutados por grupos armados y organizaciones criminales, los trabajadores de los derechos humanos y organizadores comunitarios enfrentan otros peligros.Los abusos contra los derechos humanos y los asesinatos extrajudiciales cometidos por grupos armados, el gobierno y las organizaciones criminales han sido bien documentados en Colombia. Los trabajadores de los derechos humanos, activistas sindicales y líderes de la comunidad y religiosos son con frecuencia el blanco de la violencia.Participar en el trabajo de los derechos humanos es percibido como estar trabajando en contra del estado, es muy similar a la manera que los grupos armados son vistos, explicó Clemencia Lopez, representante legal de la cooperativa.Lopez y su familia – ella tiene tres hijo, dos adolescentes y el tercero de 9años de edad– fueron desplazados tres veces, dos a causa del conflicto armado y una vez debido  a la actividad criminal y violencia que ocurrió alrededor de ellos. Una vez hubo tres granadas lanzadas en frente del restaurante que ella y esposo tenían, dijo.“Estábamos en medio de la confrontación” dijo durante una entrevista en mayo de 2013 en su oficina en el Segundo piso de Misión Espíritu Santo.Alrededor del tiempo que se produjo el incidente en frente del restaurante, Lopez estaba participando en un taller sobre la mujer y la igualdad en el género; en el 2007 ella participó con la cooperativa de mujeres, la cual ha crecido para incluir a ocho organizaciones.“[Al comienzo] no sabíamos cómo usar las computadoras”, dijo Lopez, quien termino la escuela secundaria en el 2009 tomando clases nocturnas aceleradas.En la sociedad en general, las mujeres no suelen recibir apoyo necesario y la capacitación en liderazgo para participar en la política. La cooperativa de mujeres proporciona a las mujeres acceso a talleres sobre derechos humanos, capacitación en liderazgo, educación y habilidades, dijo Lopez.Además, la sociedad patriarcal de Colombia excluye a las mujeres con mucha frecuencia.Clemencia Lopez y Fabiola Murcia son miembros de Mesa Organización de Mujeres de Soacha, una cooperativa sobre los derechos de las mujeres y apoderamiento con oficinas en la Iglesia Espíritu Santo. Foto: Lynette Wilson /ENSEn el 2012, el gobierno colombiano aprobó la política sobre igualdad de género y un plan integral contra la violencia. Sin embargo un informe del 2013 por el Comité de los Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas para Eliminar la Discriminación contra la Mujer encontró “la persistencia de actitudes patriarcas y estereotipos profundamente arraigados en relación con las funciones y responsabilidades de las mujeres y los hombres en la familia y la sociedad” Aún más, esas actitudes y estereotipos eran responsables de la situación de las mujeres y una desventaja en la vida política  y pública, mercado laboral, prevalencia de la violencia contra las mujeres y la segregación del género, en relación con las oportunidades de educación para las niñas, indicó el informe.Además de la discriminación que las personas desplazadas enfrentan– que es además otra forma de discriminación de género, raza, económica– el desplazamiento pone una tensión en las familias, con esposos y esposas quienes con frecuencia se culpan unos a otros por su situación, dijo Lopez, agregando que la participación en el trabajo de los derechos humanos puede además causar tensión en las relaciones.“Las mujeres que participan en los derechos humanos se exponen a un riesgo”, dijo Romero, quien con frecuencia acompaña a las mujeres en marchas y demostraciones.La cooperativa de mujeres llego a estar ubicada en la Iglesia Espíritu Santo en el 2010, después que amigos de Lopez le presentaron al obispo de la Diócesis of Colombia Francisco Duque. Desde entonces Lopez ha estado participando como líder laico de la diócesis.Una de las cosas que las mujeres han logrado es una plataforma de política pública para la mujer, incluyendo el derecho de vivir una vida libre de violencia, el acceso a la educación y atención médica, las oportunidades económicas, y el derecho a vacaciones, algo que una vida de desplazamiento y exclusión social no puede solventar.“Aquí en Soacha ellos han dignificado el papel de la mujer”, dijo  Guevara, a un grupo de visitantes en Mayo del 2013.– Lynette Wilson es una editora/reportera para Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Por Lynette WilsonPosted Jun 23, 2014 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Colombia: La Iglesia se une a las personas internamente desplazadas Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

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Namibia upset Uruguay and move up World Rankings after dramatic final play of the game

first_imgMonday Jun 10, 2019 Namibia upset Uruguay and move up World Rankings after dramatic final play of the game Namibia have risen two points in the world rankings after a thrilling last-minute win over Uruguay in Montevideo in the World Rugby Nations Cup on Sunday. Russia also claimed a win, over Argentina XV, to set up an intriguing final round of fixtures. ADVERTISEMENTNamibia, perhaps the weakest side expected to be at the Rugby World Cup in Japan, started well and went into half-time against Uruguay leading 17-7.They maintained their lead throughout the second half until the 77th minute, when a converted German Kessler try put Uruguay ahead for the first time in the match at 28-27.With the game drawing to a close, Namibia snatched victory in dramatic fashion with an 81st-minute Cliven Loubser penalty.As a result, Nambia move up two places in the latest World Rugby Rankings to a record high of 21, overtaking Canada and Portugal. Uruguay slipped below Samoa with the loss, down to 17th position.The full match video is below so you can skip to the end to watch the dramatic final few minutesADVERTISEMENTEarlier in the day, Russia scored an impressive 17 unanswered points in the first 10 minutes, before a further three converted tries before half-time sent them into the break 38-14 up against Argentina XV.The South American side fought back in the second half, scoring four tries to cut the deficit to five points, but a 76th-minute penalty from Sergei Ianiushkin sealed the 48-40 win.All four teams in the Nations Cup are now on one win each, with the round-robin tournament set to reach its climax on Saturday with Namibia facing Russia at 15:30 local time (GMT-3) before Uruguay tackle Argentina XV (18.00 local time).Watch the Argentina XV vs Russia full match replay belowADVERTISEMENT credit: world rugby Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error See it to Believe it Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Experts explain what actually happens… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Leigh Halfpenny makes yet another… 26 WEEKS AGO Parisse alley-oop magic sets up brilliant… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Small House / UNEMORI ARCHITECTS

first_img Japan Photographs Save this picture!© Ken Sasajima+ 21Curated by Clara Ott Share ArchDaily CopyHouses•Meguro, Japan Small House / UNEMORI ARCHITECTS Houses CopyAbout this officeUNEMORI ARCHITECTSOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesMeguroIcebergJapanPublished on April 14, 2019Cite: “Small House / UNEMORI ARCHITECTS” 14 Apr 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodPanel Façade SystemRailing / BalustradesMitrexIntegrated Photovoltaic Railing – BIPV RailingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BrassHanging LampsVibiaHanging Lamp – VOLConcreteKrytonCrystalline Waterproofing – KIMSkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight FE PassivhausPorcelain StonewareCosentinoSurfaces – Dekton® Chromica CollectionBricksFeldhaus KlinkerThin Bricks – ClassicGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Printing for Interior DesignWoodStructureCraftEngineering – FootbridgesAluminium CompositesCymat Technologies Ltd.Bundang Doosan Tower – Alusion™ Stabilized Aluminum FoamTable LampsRoss GardamDesk Lamp – OraMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?4米x4米x9米小型住宅 / Unemori Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream “COPY” Architects: UNEMORI ARCHITECTS Area Area of this architecture project 2010center_img Small House / UNEMORI ARCHITECTSSave this projectSaveSmall House / UNEMORI ARCHITECTS Year:  Area:  67 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/443758/small-house-unemori-architects Clipboard Photographs:  Ken Sasajima Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Manufacturers: test unificacion 2Save this picture!© Ken SasajimaRecommended ProductsPorcelain StonewareApariciPorcelain Tiles – BuildWoodParklex International S.L.Wood cladding – FacadePorcelain StonewareGrespaniaPorcelain Tiles- CoverlamEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAText description provided by the architects. The small house which the married couple and their child live stands at the densely populated area in Tokyo. Though the neighboring houses is very close, I aimed to design the house which exceed the physical narrowness living at the city.  I laid out the 4m×4m building that as small as I can at the center of site area 34m2 and made some space for flowing of light and wind around it. And by making the space, it’s possible to avoid setback regulation and it has the 9m high volume like a tower. The inside is simple structure what is separated by the 4 floor boards and is jointed by spiral stairway. Especially, by making some extremely thin floor boards (thickness 70mm) , the up and down floor boards got close and connected the whole space of the house without a break.Save this picture!© Ken SasajimaSave this picture!Save this picture!© Ken SasajimaThe space of around the house is useful to let light and wind in. The wall of the rooms borders the outside, so I put windows in the best position that harmonizing with its surroundings. And the window is so big against the small room, every time the window opens or closes, the inside view dramatically changes. Especially, at the second and third floor there is a large hinged door each room, if it is opened, the inside of the room is enveloped in light and wind as if you are outside. By making the thin floor boards for connecting with their life and making the large windows what are opened toward the city, I aimed to exceed the segmentation, for example the up stair and the down stair, the inside and the outside, a building and the town, etc… to broaden the whole image of a house.Note: this article was originally published on 1 November, 2013Save this picture!© Ken SasajimaProject gallerySee allShow lessTree House / 6a ArchitectsSelected ProjectsKAAT Architects and Yalin Architectural Design Shortlisted for International Design …Architecture News Share “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/443758/small-house-unemori-architects Clipboard Projectslast_img read more

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Kage Partnership publish annual salary survey on 5th anniversary

first_img  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 21 January 2003 | News The company suggests that there may be a shift in the fundraising job market this year with the falling returns on investments and the reduction in funds available from trusts and foundations. “Cautious budgeting in the charity sector and shrinking job opportunities in the commercial sector are beginning to change the emphasis away from what has been an applicants’ market for some time now,” comments the company. “However, there is no doubt that experienced fundraisers with a proven track record are still highly sought after.”A summary of the 2003 salary survey is available from Kage Partnership. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Fundraising recruitment specialists, the Kage Partnership, are marking their fifth anniversary this month with the publication of their latest annual salary survey. Kage Partnership’s survey is good news for trust fundraisers since it confirms that they are continuing to command salaries equal to their corporate fundraising colleagues. There is still a shortage of experienced job applicants in this area. There have not been enough new entrants coming into trust fundraising in recent years, partly due to the lack of training opportunities and partly due to the relatively low profile of this type of work. “Junior fundraising applicants come to us wanting to get into events or corporate fundraising and tend to be completely unaware of trusts roles,” say Kage. Advertisement Kage Partnership publish annual salary survey on 5th anniversarylast_img read more

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Back to the Future acceleration game raises funds for Parkinson’s UK

first_img Howard Lake | 23 October 2015 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Tagged with: Celebrity corporate games Back to the Future acceleration game raises funds for Parkinson’s UK 88p was the appropriate donation if you reached 88 mph in timeDidn’t reach 88 mph? You’re outatime. Back To The Future Day was the date to which Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) and Dr. Emmett Brown (Christopher Lloyd) travelled in 1989 film Back to the Future part II.Fox has established a charitable foundation and fundraised for research into Parkinson’s disease, a condition he has lived with since 1991.  103 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Marketing agency Savvy Marketing Ltd came up with an appropriate idea to raise funds on Back To The Future day this week. It created an online game and offered to donate 88p to Parkinson’s UK each time someone won.The Back to the Future game requires players to click on one of three blue circles within the Flux Capacitor as they light up in random order. The object is to click or tap on them fast enough within 30 seconds to boost the Delorean car to the magic 88 mph at which it will roar into the future.The company offered to donate 88p for each successful participant, up to a maximum donation of £500. It created the game on its own, so its terms and conditions made clear that it was not endorsed or administered by the charity, although no doubt they were pleased to benefit from it. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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City Corporation encourages donations to Hurricane Dorian appeal after giving £25k

first_imgCity Corporation encourages donations to Hurricane Dorian appeal after giving £25k Melanie May | 9 September 2019 | News Tagged with: disaster AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis5 The City of London Corporation has donated £25,000 to Team Rubicon’s UK’s Hurricane Dorian disaster response appeal and is encouraging City firms and individuals to support the effort.Team Rubicon UK staff are providing aid to people in the most remote areas affected by the hurricane. The winds that hit the Abaco Islands equalled the highest ever recorded at landfall, and Grand Bahama also suffered severe damage and floods.The donation comes from the Corporation’s Disaster Relief Fund, which seeks to relieve human suffering, bringing its total donations in the last three years to £225,000.In the past three years, the City of London Corporation has given £30,000 to the Disasters Emergency Committee’s Cyclone Idai Appeal; £25,000 towards the We Love Manchester Appeal, following the devastating terror attack in the city; £70,000 to the Disasters Emergency Committee’s Indonesia Tsunami Appeals; and £75,000 in total to emergency appeals in Burma, South Asia, and for those affected by Hurricane Irma.Jeremy Mayhew, Chairman of the City of London Corporation’s Finance Committee, said:“This hurricane has caused catastrophic damage, wrecking thousands of homes and contaminating water through extensive flooding.“We are calling upon City firms and individuals to join us in supporting this appeal. The urgent task is to provide food, water, shelter, and security as quickly as possible. With a rising death toll and many more still missing, communities have been torn apart and livelihoods destroyed. The time to act is now.”  176 total views,  2 views today Advertisement  177 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis5 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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Still demanding justice for Michael Brown

first_imgParent and child at protest in Ferguson, Mo.The people of Ferguson, Mo., and supporters are still demanding the indictment and arrest of white police officer Darren Wilson for fatally shooting 18-year-old Michael Brown on Aug. 9. They attempted to block traffic on Interstate 70 on Sept. 10.Large numbers of police were in force to try to prevent the protest from having the desired impact. Despite the heavy law enforcement mobilization and the arrests of 35 protesters, traffic was tied up for hours.The demonstration illustrated the African-American community’s ongoing discontent in the St. Louis suburb, which in August witnessed the most significant urban rebellion in several years in the United States. When the youth in Ferguson rose up in mass demonstrations, it struck a chord among African Americans and other oppressed communities across the U.S.On Sept. 10, RT reported on the civil disobedience that day: “The protest started at 3 p.m. Central time, with people gathering at the Hanley Road interchange. Police lined the overpass and stood along the street, then surrounded the demonstrators.”St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer David Carson wrote on Twitter during the start of the action: “Police on Hanley seem ready for lots of arrests with a Department of Corrections bus.” Riverfront Times journalist Danny Wicentowski tweeted that a massive reserve force, of more than 20 police cars, was near the staging area.A Sept. 10 Blaze article reported: “The community appears to be growing impatient as Ferguson officer Darren Wilson waits to find out whether or not he will be indicted by a grand jury in Brown’s death. Some in the community are vowing only a conviction will satisfy protesters.”The Blaze article quoted St. Louis resident Whitman Harris who told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch: “If (Darren Wilson) doesn’t get a guilty conviction, this whole nation is going to riot.”Criminalization of residents exposedThe Sept. 9 Ferguson City Council meeting was the first since Brown’s shooting a month earlier. The turnout was so large that it was moved from City Hall to Greater Grace Church to accommodate 600 participants.Residents expressed outrage over the St. Louis County grand jury’s failure to indict Wilson. Security guards restrained some speakers who were not satisfied with officials’ responses. Mayor James Knowles III stated that the City Council would only listen to comments from the public. People yelled, “Shut it down!” referring to the legislative body.Several “criminal justice reforms” were read into the record at the meeting, which illustrated the blatant criminalization of the majority African-American community in Ferguson. It was revealed that local authorities had arrested some 12,000 people out of a population of 21,000.Such a large number of arrests of Ferguson residents sheds light on the state’s efforts to criminalize Brown after his death. Mass demonstrations opposing Brown’s killing and demanding justice were immediately portrayed as unlawful acts, which prompted the militarization of the police and their utilization of high-powered rifles, teargas, pepper spray, bean bags and rubber bullets.St. Louis Today reported on the Sept. 9 meeting: “The overhaul to the municipal court system includes reducing revenue from fines and reforming procedures. Court fine revenue would have to stay at or below 15 percent of the city’s total revenue and any court revenue over that amount be used for special community projects instead of general revenue uses.”Hundreds of people went to the Ferguson police clerk’s office during the week after the City Council meeting to test the reforms. Those facing imminent arrest were given 30 days to arrange payments of outstanding fines that could land them in jail.The Sept. 12 New York Times said those who went to work out payments “looked around skeptically.” It quoted Katrina Clemons, who owed nearly $800 in fines and penalties from a $250 traffic ticket, “I don’t know if they are going to lock me up.”In 2013, Ferguson issued more than 25,000 arrest warrants, averaging about three per household. The Arch Defenders League, a local nonprofit organization, revealed that about half the courtrooms in Ferguson and surrounding cities often blatantly violate residents’ constitutional guarantees, subjecting them to detention, job losses and evictions.A Sept. 12 New York Times review noted, “Data from municipal courts across Missouri show that in 2013 … Ferguson had the highest number of warrants issued in the state relative to its size. Arrest warrants are often served by municipal courts when someone fails to appear in court to pay fines for traffic or other violations, like shoplifting, assault or disturbance of peace.”With such a criminal justice collection and incarceration policy in Ferguson and surrounding cities, the only real solution must go beyond mere reforms. It must guarantee a general amnesty for those facing fines and jail sentences for alleged offenses. Such a gesture by the municipal courts would provide a mechanism for some normalization of relations among the police, the prosecutors and the judicial system — and the people.This amnesty — and the immediate indictment and arrest of police officer Darren Wilson — would go a long way toward meeting some of the demands put forward by the people of Ferguson. Additional programs aimed at job creation and educational opportunities would help to address the gross economic underdevelopment so prevalent in the region.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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USDA Unveils Resources to Help Small, Medium, and Beginning Farmers

first_imgThe resources include additional credit programs, grants, changes in crop insurance, low interest loans for on farm storage and processing facilities, and even new market reports from the USDA Market News Service to help growers of specialty crops.  USDA is also introducing a series of educational tools focusing on opportunities for farmers engaged in local and regional food systems. In addition, USDA field staff will be boosting their outreach efforts to small and mid-sized farmers and ranchers. Previous articleTwo Hoosiers Earn NPPC Pork Industry ScholarshipNext articlePork Checkoff Designates More Funds for Stemming PEDV Spread Gary Truitt SHARE Home News Feed USDA Unveils Resources to Help Small, Medium, and Beginning Farmers USDA Unveils Resources to Help Small, Medium, and Beginning Farmers Vilsack also announced an expansion of the Farm to School program which helps connect local schools with local farms to supply food for the school lunch program, “This program educates educators about the opportunities in their local communities to buy directly from local farmers.”     Since 2013, USDA has invested nearly $10 million in Farm to School grants that support schools as they purchase from local and regional sources. While this program is successful in several states, Indiana has lagged in its adoption. Last October, Governor Pence announced a $100K grant for Greenfield schools, but sources have told HAT there are very few documented cases of Hoosier schools participating in the program. The new efforts announced by the Secretary today include:ACCESS TO CAPITALChanges to the Farm Storage and Facility Loan (FSFL) Program to help small and midsized fruit and vegetable producers access the program for cold storage and related equipment like wash and pack stations. Diversified and smaller fruit and vegetable producers, including Community Supported Agriculture programs, are now eligible for a waiver from the requirement that they carry crop insurance or NAP coverage when they apply for a FSFL loan. FSFL can also be used to finance hay barns and grain bins.Funding for producers under the popular microloan program. USDA launched the microloan program to allow beginning, small and mid-sized farmers to access up to $35,000 in loans using a simplified application process. Since their debut in 2013, USDA has issued more than 4,900 microloans totaling $97 million.Funding for hoop houses to extend the growing season. Hoop houses provide revenue opportunities while also promoting conservation for small and mid-sized farmers. The hoop house cost share program began as a pilot in 2010. Since then, more than 10,000 hoop houses have been contracted. USDA will soon announce an additional $15 million for hoop house development in persistent poverty counties in nineteen states as part of USDA’s StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity Initiative.RISK MANAGEMENT Developing tools to help small and midsized farmers and ranchers make sound financial decisions as they plan for their future. USDA is developing a whole farm insurance policy that will better meet the needs of highly-diversified producers, particularly small and midsized fruit and vegetable growers. Using new tools provided by the Farm Bill, USDA is working to reduce crop insurance costs for beginning farmers and ranchers. And organic producers will benefit from the elimination of a previously-required five percent surcharge on crop insurance premiums.LOCATING MARKET OPPORTUNITIESUSDA’s Farm to School Program has put seven new Farm to School Coordinators on the ground in regional offices to help build direct relationships between small and mid-sized producers and school districts. One priority area for Farm to School is creating more opportunities for small and mid-sized livestock and poultry producers. Since 2013, USDA has invested nearly $10 million in Farm to School grants that support schools as they purchase from local and regional sources. In the 2011-2012 school year alone, schools spent nearly $355 million on local and regional food purchases.Expanded price, volume, supply and demand information through Market News. Market News is now collecting price data on grass-fed beef to arm producers will real pricing information from the sector. Market News will also soon begin collecting data about local food prices and volume, valuable to small and mid-sized producers engaged in that marketplace. Market News provides real time price, volume, supply, and demand information for producers to use in making production and marketing decisions. Access to timely, unbiased market information levels the playing field for all producers participating in the marketplace.Broadened the National Farmers Market Directory to include CSAs, on-farm stores and food hubs. This information will help small and mid-sized producers find new market opportunities. USDA will begin collecting data to update the directory for the 2014 season this spring. The USDA National Farmers Market Directory receives over 2 million hits annually.FOOD SAFETYLaunched pilot projects in five states to help small and mid-sized farmers achieve Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) certification. GAP certification indicates farmers have met food safety standards required by many retail buyers. Under these pilot programs, small and mid-sized producers will be able to share the costs and fees associated with the certification process as a group. Group GAP efforts are being developed in partnership with small and mid-sized producer groups in Michigan, Wisconsin, Montana, Pennsylvania and Missouri.EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES AND OUTREACH Created a Learning Guide Series for small and mid-sized producers to help them navigate available USDA resources, available on the Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food website. The first in this series will be for small and mid-sized livestock and poultry producers. Additional Learning Guides will be released later this year. USDA field staff and StrikeForce teams will increase outreach to small and mid-sized producers using the Learning Guides.Launched Small Scale Solutions for Your Farm, a series of educational resources designed for both small livestock and fruit and vegetable producers. This includes tips on simple management activities such as planting cover crops to complex structural practices such as animal waste management systems or innovative irrigation devices2014 FARM BILL The recently-signed 2014 Farm Bill provides USDA with more direct resources to support small and mid-sized farmers, including:Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program (BFRDP), which provides grants to organizations that train, educate and provide outreach and technical assistance to new and beginning farmers on production, marketing, business management, legal strategies and other topics critical to running a successful operation. The 2014 Farm Bill provides $100 million total to BFRDP over the next 5 years.Value-Added Producer Grant Program was modified to allow USDA to better target small and mid-sized family farms, beginning and socially-disadvantaged farmers, and veterans. The 2014 Farm Bill provides $63 million over the next 5 years.Farmers Market and Local Food Promotion Program is expanded to support both direct-to-consumer opportunities and other supply chain projects such as food hubs. The 2014 Farm Bill provides $30 million annually.USDA FY2015 BUDGET PROPOSALUSDA last week released its FY2015 Budget, which includes additional resources to help small and mid-sized farmers and ranchers, including:$2.5 million to provide food safety training to owners and operators of small farms, small food processors, and small fruit and vegetable vendors affected by Food Safety Modernization Act.$3 million for Small, Socially Disadvantaged Producers Grants Program to ensure historically underprivileged rural Americans have opportunities for cooperative development.$2.5 million for a new Food and Agriculture Resilience Program for Military Veterans (FARM-Vets) that promotes research, education, and extension activity for veterans.$11 million for the Value-Added Producer Grants Program. The 2014 Farm Bill provides an additional $63 million in mandatory funding that is available until expended.$2.5 million in funding for the National Agricultural Statistics Service to conduct a survey on land ownership and farm financial characteristics. This supports an Administration priority that will provide additional demographic data related to small and beginning farmers and ranchers.$1.2 million for the Office of Advocacy and Outreach to carry out these responsibilities and the provisions of the 2014 Farm Bill related to outreach to beginning, small, and socially disadvantaged farmers, and ranchers, including veterans, and rural communities.$25.7 million for Departmental Administration to maintain critical support activities and oversight for the Department, including management of small and disadvantaged business utilization programs. SHARE USDA Unveils Resources to Help Small, Medium, and Beginning FarmersIn the 2012 ag census, the number of large farms got larger and the number of small farms also got larger, but the number of middle-sized operations continued to decline.  Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack announced several new programs designed to help medium, small, and beginning farmers on Monday during a telephone conference with farm broadcasters, “USDA is taking a hard look at our existing resources to ensure that they work for producers of all sizes. We’ve adjusted policies, strengthened programs, and intensified outreach to meet the needs of small and mid-sized producers. These producers are critical to our country’s agricultural and economic future.” Facebook Twitter Vilsack maintains, however, that these new programs, along with programs on the new Farm Bill, will help grow this sector of agriculture. He said more small and medium-sized farms help bring diversity to American agriculture, diversity in the size of producers and the crops produced. He added these resources will help returning veterans who want to get into farming get the training and resources they need to get started. By Gary Truitt – Mar 10, 2014 Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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