Addo Food Group seeks talent for graduate initiative

first_imgSource: Addo Food GroupChilled pastry producer Addo Food Group has launched a graduate employment programme in a drive to attract talent into the industry.The group, which has bakeries in Nottingham, Dorset and Shropshire, is offering a two-year placement for graduates interested in a career in food manufacturing, operations and commercial management.The programme features a combination of educational and workplace learning with modules covering strategic operations, marketing, sustainability and disruptive innovation.“At Addo, we are passionate about developing our next generation of leaders,” said Deborah Bolton, CEO of Addo Food Group. “This is integral and at the heart of not only our graduate programme but also our wider business.“All the graduates that successfully join our scheme will benefit from accelerated development into leadership and management, allowing personal progression into business management roles. We want to hear from graduates who want new experiences and are especially passionate about getting involved in our sustainability and volunteering programmes,” Bolton added.The graduates who take part in the programme will be allocated a member of the group’s executive team as their dedicated mentor and will also be assigned a manager for each module of work to set aims and objectives, the company said.“I would definitely recommend taking part in the Addo graduate programme,” said Tom Thackray, a marketing executive who is currently on a university placement year and trialling the graduate programme.“You are encouraged to get involved in a wide range of experiences and I have been able to learn all about the elements that make up the business, including experiencing the full lifecycle of bringing a product to market, from an idea to its listing within a supermarket,” he added.Applicants for the scheme must have graduated within the last two years with a minimum of a 2:1 degree in a relevant field such as business management, marketing or business development. The starting salary is £24,000-£26,000. The closing date for applications is 30 April 2021.Addo Food Group manufacturers a range of quiches, pies, slices, scotch eggs, sausage rolls and pork pies for retailers and brands including Wall’s Pastry and Pork Farms.last_img read more

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Court acts on fee multipliers

first_imgCourt acts on fee multipliers Court acts on fee multipliers November 15, 2003 Regular Newscenter_img Contingency fee multipliers cannot be used when awarding reasonable attorneys’ fees under F.S. §768.79, the Florida Supreme Court said in an October 2 opinion.In case no. SC02-428, the court reviewed Allstate Insurance Co. v. Sarkis, 809 So. 2d 6 (Fla. 5th DCA 2001), a case in which the petitioner was involved in an automobile accident in which she suffered damages. The plaintiff offered, under F.S. §768.79, which considers reasonableness of attorneys’ fees after an offer of judgment has been made, to accept $10,000 under her uninsured motorist coverage. The offer was rejected; the case went to trial; and the plaintiff was ultimately awarded $87,700.Since the verdict exceeded the offer by more than 25 percent, under the statute the trial court awarded attorneys’ fees of $58,450. After noting that Allstate had a regular practice of contesting such claims and other factors in court, the judge then applied a 1.5 multiplier factor.In its 6-1 opinion, the court agreed with an en banc ruling of the Fifth District Court of Appeal that the multiplier was not allowed under the statute, or under Rule 1.442, Florida Rules of Civil Procedure, which explains attorneys’ fees are sanctions after an offer of judgment has been refused.In his concurring opinion, Justice Charles T. Wells made the argument that: “Counsel agreed to the representation of the client and entered into a contract with the client for the representation prior to the offer of judgment.. . [hence] justifying a fee multiplier, which is whether a fee enhancement is required to obtain competent counsel, cannot be met because when an offer of judgment is made and rejected, counsel has already been obtained.”Justice Wells continued that Rule 1.442 states that attorneys’ fees are sanctions that can only be applied after the date the offer of judgment was served upon the rejecting party, not from the original date the counsel agreed to undertake the representation.Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead and Justices Fred Lewis, Peggy Quince, and Kenneth Bell concurred in the per curiam opinion, and Bell also concurred with Wells’ concurring opinion.In dissenting, Justice Barbara Pariente stated that the language of F.S. §768.79 clearly places multiplier fees within the category of “all relevant criteria” considered when calculating award of attorneys’ fees, arguing that multiplier fees supported the underlying policy of the statute, to promote settlements.“The use of the contingency risk factor.. . serves the goals of both ensuring access to the courts by potential litigants and encouraging settlement of claims,” she said.Justice Pariente also argued that F.S. §768.79 did allow for using a multiplier.“The court has adopted a forced, rather than a strict, construction of an unambiguous statute in rejecting the contingent nature of the representation as one of the ‘relevant criteria’ in determining the reasonableness of a fee award under F.S. §768.79 (7)(b). Strict construction in favor of a party receiving a sanction is required only when the statutory language being construed is ambiguous. . . therefore, in my view, the majority’s act of excluding a contingency risk multiplier from consideration as a relevant criterion is an unwarranted exercise in statutory construction.”For more information on SC02-428, visit the court’s Web site, www.flcourts.org.last_img read more

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Good Governance: Board officer development

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Help everyone grow the skills to be chair.by: Les Wallace, Ph.D.In general I don’t recommend supporting any candidate for your board who you don’t believe could be chair. That’s a tall order, but also a helpful screen.Board officer leadership is a foundation for effective governance, yet one of the least-attended-to governance development domains. In the for-profit sector, the topic is gaining greater attention. In the not-for-profit sector, development offerings for specific board officers are rare. In the credit union space, officer development has been mostly barren until CUES’ Board Chair Development Seminar was introduced. (The next installment will be held in March in New Orleans.)Because many CU board members do not have prior board experience, they haven’t had good officer role models. Serving as the chair of a board (or vice-chair or secretary and so on) is not a “natural” leadership role like being a credit union manager or CEO. Serving as a board officer demands a servant leadership approach, a quiet influencing hand and a strong will when confronting aberrant board behavior.Chairs must be able to adeptly navigate some specific governance processes if they are to help the board be both efficient and effective. Here is just a sample of the domains of responsibility a board chair might be accountable for: driving high-performance governance; keeping track of board duties and putting them on the calendar; agenda setting; committee accountability; CEO partnership; meeting management/facilitation; government relations/advocacy; governance assessment; and handling feedback to board members from members at large. continue reading »last_img read more

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Can you send us a W-9?

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » This week, NAFCU heard from many credit unions who received a letter from Progressive Insurance asking the credit union to fill out and return an IRS Form W-9. Many credit unions have asked us why this letter was being sent, if the credit union needs to do this, and similar concerns. While tax law is quite technical and complex, so somewhat outside the scope of our expertise, Progressive’s letter indicates their request is driven by a January 1, 2019 requirement under the U.S. Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA).As background, FATCA was passed into law in March 2010 and requires backup withholding for certain kinds of payments. FATCA has a large impact on foreign financial institutions and nonfinancial foreign entities. Many credit unions are familiar with the W8-BEN form and other FACTA-related requirements. For example, FATCA also requires U.S. institutions to withhold tax on certain payments to foreign financial institutions (FFIs) that do not report information to the IRS regarding their U.S. accounts. U.S. withholding agents must also withhold tax on certain payments to nonfinancial foreign entities (NFFE) that do not provide information on their substantial U.S. owners. So what does this have to do with Progressive’s letter?As far as upcoming deadlines, from what we can gather, effective January 1, 2019, a 30% withholding tax will apply to “gross proceeds from the sale or other disposition” of any property that produces certain covered income. This applies to certain individuals when payments are made to some non-US financial institutions – generally for non-US financial institutions who are not from a country with an “intergovernmental agreement.”last_img read more

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CDC urges culturing suspected E coli samples

first_imgOct 3, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is urging clinical laboratories to use bacterial culture of stool specimens in suspected cases of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection to facilitate diagnosis and proper control measures.Failure to culture specimens can cause labs to mistake some other pathogen for E coli O157:H7, leading to inappropriate public health measures, the CDC warns in the Sep 29 issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.That happened last year in North Carolina, where a clinical lab used enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to look for Shiga toxin—which is produced by E coli O157:H7 and other pathogenic E coli strains—in a specimen from a baby. Test results were positive, leading authorities to take public health measures appropriate for Shiga toxin–producing E coli (STEC) strains. Those included barring the baby and several other sick children from their day care center until two stool cultures showed them to be free of STEC.”Some days” after the EIA result, the lab sent the patient sample to the state public health lab, which tested it and found no STEC, the report says. The sample was then sent to the CDC, where an EIA again showed Shiga toxin, but further tests for Shiga toxin genes were negative. Subsequently the state lab tested more samples from the index patient and four other patients and found they had norovirus.After this finding, authorities changed the control measures, and the sick children were allowed to return to the day care center as soon as they were well, the report says.”As the North Carolina outbreak demonstrates, occasional false-positive results from the Stx [Shiga toxin] EIA test can result in inappropriate and unnecessary public health action,” the CDC states. If the lab had cultured for E coli O157 at the same time as it ran the EIA or immediately afterward, a negative result might have prompted an earlier search for norovirus, the report says.The article also reports on an outbreak in a New York state prison last year that turned out to have been caused by E coli O45:nonmotile, a far less common strain than O157:H7. In that episode, an EIA pointed to Shiga toxin, but cultures were negative for E coli O157:H7. Eventually the CDC tested isolates from three patients and identified the O45 serotype.The CDC recommends that clinical labs use EIA to screen stool samples for Shiga toxins and, ideally, culture samples for STEC O157 at the same time, which facilitates rapid diagnosis and treatment of patients and rapid subtyping by public health labs.Labs that don’t simultaneously culture samples for STEC O157 should culture any Shiga toxin–positive broths for STEC O157 as soon as possible and send the isolates to a public health lab for confirmation and subtyping, the CDC advises. If a Shiga toxin–positive broth does not yield STEC O157, it should be sent to a public health lab for identification of non–O157 STEC. Public health labs should send all non–O157 STEC isolates to the CDC for confirmation, the agency says.CDC. Importance of culture confirmation of Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli infection as illustrated by outbreaks of gastroenteritis—New York and North Carolina, 2005. MMWR 2006 Sep 29;55(38):1042-5 [Full text]last_img read more

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Project Ilica: Q’Art as an excellent festival of cultural and creative industry brings life back to the city center

first_imgThe slightly dormant Ilica, spoiled by abandoned courtyards and street spaces, will breathe with full lungs and courtyards again from May 18 to 25, thanks to the creative and cultural industries.The Ilica: Q’Art project opens its doors and invites all citizens, but also visitors to the city, to a multitude of music, literary, dance, film, art and other programs. This five-year development project is signed and organized by Aleksandar Battista Ilić and Ivana Nikolić Popović, co-organized by the Academy of Fine Arts (ALU), the City of Zagreb, the Croatian Cluster of Competitiveness of Creative and Cultural Industries (HKKKKI) and sponsored by the Ministry of Culture and the Ministry of State Property. Zagreb and the Zagreb Tourist Board.The programs will be held at Rok Park (art, music), ALU Park, in 9 empty courtyards (exhibitions, art workshops, books), and 20 street windows will become an exhibition space for students and artists. In the park between Ilica and Dalmatinska, films for children and adults will be shown outdoors every day, and the British Square will tell us its artistic story. Visitors can expect as many as 26 artistic and participatory workshops, 19 lectures and presentations, 16 art performances, 9 art exhibitions and 8 concerts of classical and jazz music.Activities on Ilica started in 2000 with the project “Community Art” with the aim of improving the quality of life, increasing the visibility of the economy, crafts and tourism with top art, says Aleksandar Battista Ilić and adds that this is the main mission of the Ilica project.Since 2016, the Academy and the Croatian Cluster of Competitiveness of Creative and Cultural Industries have jointly launched a much larger action, Project Ilica. This year, we put the emphasis on Q’Art, which marks the art district, because this is where all the art academies of the city of Zagreb are located. In the long run, we want to brand the entire project as a cultural, tourist and economic value of the city of Zagreb. The point is that creative and cultural institutions help the economy, that is, give the economy and tourism more added value. ” Battista Ilic points out.The project aims to raise the quality of life and encourage dialogue between citizens and public administration, in order to return the culture and various facilities to the abandoned spaces in the city center. Encouraging entrepreneurship and production within the local community is another, no less important goal of this project, closely related to unused public spaces, of which only in Ilica (from number 1 to 212) there are as many as 76, and they represent great energy, social, aesthetic, health and an environmental problem.ALEKSANDAR BATTISTA ILIĆ: Art and culture communicate with the most complex human language, and that is emotion. And that is exactly what we need, through emotion and experience, to offer quality content in tourist destinationsAleksandar Battista Ilić, Academy of Fine Arts in ZagrebToday, the production of quality content and the ability to innovate, narrate, imagine and stimulate emotions have become our most valuable resource, which needs to be nurtured, supported, promoted and protected. It is our diversity and authenticity that is our most valuable resource, but again, we seem to be ashamed of it.Otherwise, Cultural and Creative Industries (KKI) are industries based on cultural values, individual creativity, skills and talent with the potential to create added value. Sometimes we are not even aware of how much they affect our lives through the design of spaces and products. KKI includes elements based on cultural and creative contribution: architecture, arts and crafts, audiovisual content (including film, television, video), cultural heritage, design (fashion, graphics, product and interior design), music, computer games and new media, books and publishing, media (radio, TV, print, web), visual arts (painting, sculpture, graphics, new media, photography), advertising and marketing communication and performing arts (theater, dance, ballet).Creative and cultural industries in Croatia generate HRK 15 billion in revenue, employ 124 people and are the second largest sector in Croatia in terms of the share of revenues in GDP (3,4 percent), according to the study “Mapping of creative and cultural industries” was prepared by the expert team of the Institute of Economics, Zagreb in cooperation with the client: Croatian Cluster, Competitiveness of Creative and Cultural Industries (HKKKKI).”Croatia has a lot of creatives, despite the fact that it does not nurture creativity through education and non-recognition of that value in society. However, according to the research, it was shown that in Croatia it is the second industry in terms of the share of Croatia’s GDP, while in Europe it is the third industry with a tendency of high growth. Through projects like this, we try to show how much cultures and creative industries can help the economy and tourism. The whole city becomes one cultural and creative platform. The creative industry connects with other industries, from the automotive industry to furniture design, and helps to create attractive high value-added products. ” Battista Ilić pointed out and added that it is therefore of strategic importance to support innovative cultural and creative industries focused on research because they can preserve linguistic and cultural diversity, pluralism and offer innovative and high quality services, especially in the context of a globalized market.Croatia, like no other country in the world, can boast and be proud of its incredible diversity and authenticity. We have so many different cultures and ways of living that we don’t understand each other. And if we know how the motive of the trip is to get to know new ways and culture of living, it is quite clear that our tourist product has gone in a total wrong direction, with a focus on the sun and the sea as the main and practically the only tourist product. Due to the positional rent and the fact that we do not strategically and sustainably deal with the development of tourism and tourist destinations, our main tourist problems have been present for years: seasonality, low added value, low tourist consumption and weak dispersion of the same to the local economy. demand spills over to imports.On the other hand, the archeological heritage in Turkey attracts ten million tourists a year, and the cultural facilities of Italy 35 million. The most developed cultural and tourist country, Great Britain annually attracts as many as 80 million tourists whose arrival is motivated by culture. As much as 40% of tourist arrivals in Western Europe and America are motivated by culture, while in Croatia the percentage is much lower, only 10% at the state level.It is our authenticity that is our greatest value and competitive advantage, and our way and culture of living must be our main tourist product. Unfortunately, it is not in this field that we fall the most. “Our culture, art and heritage as well as creative industries are not nearly enough used in Croatia. Regardless of the fact that people through tourism, apart from the sun and the sea, notice that there are beautiful cities and history, but this is far from presenting heritage and culture properly, especially our contemporary art that is recognized in the world..  Unfortunately, KKI is used to a very small extent to improve tourism. The biggest pain of tourism is that it is concentrated only in the summer, and it is the authentic content that creates the motive for coming. “Battista Ilic pointed out.The motive for the arrival is not accommodation but diverse, quality and primarily authentic content of the tourist destination. So authenticity is the very essence of tourism, and we still figuratively sell French wine to the French, instead of our own. Due to the globalization and standardization of everything and everything, this authenticity is even more pronounced and important for every nation. Instead of being our own, we desperately want to be copies of other destinations through tourism which is insane.”Today, nothing happens without the creative industry, designers, artists… all products and spaces must be visually designed by someone. On the other hand, art and culture communicate with the most complex human language, and that is emotion. And that is exactly what we need, through emotion and experience, to offer quality content in tourist destinations. In fact, emotions and experiences attract tourists. They want to see and most importantly experience something new, different and authentic. Unfortunately, we have tourism with low added value and tourists have no reason to stay longer because we still sell sun and sea, and without so much important content”Says Battista Ilić and emphasizes that real life has gone to shopping malls without an identity, and authenticity is being lost and the city center is dying out. ” This is our main story, and Ilica is just one positive model and example of how to generate new added value through KKI. We need synergy between public administrations and institutions, associations, the economy through a triple helix model that contributes to strengthening the development capacity of society. This is exactly what we want to achieve through the Ilica project. We want to connect creatives, artists, innovators with the economy and crafts. ” concludes Battista Ilić.We have everything, but again there are tons, but no picture. The situation of KIKI in Croatia is bad, but regardless of the bad environment, in spite of everyone and everything, it shows that no one can take away our innovation and creativity. Our cultural and creative industries are more recognized outside of Croatia, which is just proof of quality. Let us use it to our advantage, and not to encourage the import, ie the export of creative and cultural individuals to create new added value elsewhere.We have to start respecting ourselves, our culture and way of life, because that is the only way others will start to respect us. The Ilica project is a great tourist story that shows us in a cultural, innovative and creative world.See more about the Ilica QArt project hereSide dish: Croatian Competitiveness Cluster of Creative and Cultural Industries (HKKKKI): MAPPING OF CREATIVE AND CULTURAL INDUSTRIES IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIAlast_img read more

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Barcelona set Samuel Umtiti asking price with Man Utd, Arsenal, PSG and Juventus interested

first_imgBarcelona set Samuel Umtiti asking price with Man Utd, Arsenal, PSG and Juventus interested Comment Umtiti is wanted by teams across Europe (Picture: Getty Images)The France international has made 97 appearances for Barca since arriving from Lyon in 2016, but fell down the pecking order last season.The commanding defender made just 14 appearances last campaign due to inconsistent form, a knee injury and Clement Lenglet taking his place in the centre of defence.However, despite this, Spanish publication Marca report that Umtiti does not want to leave the Nou Camp and will reject offers to move away, even if the club are keen to end his stay at the Nou Camp.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityManchester United began initial talks with Umtiti last month as they sounded out a deal for the Frenchman, but they have continued to chase the Maguire deal.Paris Saint-Germain has become an option for the defender as Barcelona try to bring Neymar back from PSG to Catalonia and Umtiti could be used as part of the deal.Juventus prefer a move for Ajax captain Matthijs de Ligt, but if that deal falls through then they will switch their attention to Umtiti.MORE: Tottenham set to beat Liverpool and Arsenal in race to sign Dani Ceballos from Real MadridMORE: Frank Lampard tells Chelsea to not let Mason Mount leave on loan Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterFriday 5 Jul 2019 11:44 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Advertisement Samuel Umtiti is up for sale this summer (Picture: Getty Images)Barcelona have reportedly set an asking price of €60m (£53.8m) for Samuel Umtiti as some of Europe’s biggest clubs monitor the situation.Manchester United and Arsenal are both interested in the centre-back’s services, while the likes of Juventus and Paris Saint-Germain are also keen on him, but it will take over £50m to bring him in, according to the Mirror.With Arsenal’s transfer budget heavily restricted this summer, thought to be around £45m, this asking price appears to have ruled the Gunners out of the race, however, they are keeping an eye on the situation and will try to pounce if they offload some players.AdvertisementAdvertisementUnited are pursuing Harry Maguire as their primary centre-back target, but after a £70m bid was rejected, they may well turn to Umtiti as a cheaper option.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Syracuse upperclassmen look for revenge against top-flight Northwestern

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Senior defender Natalie Glanell is worried she might have trouble falling asleep on Saturday night. That’s understandable considering Syracuse is playing Northwestern on Sunday, a team that has given the senior class nightmares during the past three seasons.The two squads have met four times in that span, including the 2012 national title game. And the Wildcats clawed their way to victory on each occasion. “It’s been a tight game, but we always come out on the wrong side,” SU senior attack Alyssa Murray said. “This year, we’re ready to come out with a good, strong win.”That will be the goal this weekend as Murray, Glanell and their fellow upperclassmen have one more chance to lead No. 3 Syracuse (8-1, 2-1 Atlantic Coast) past the pesky No. 7 Wildcats (4-2, 2-1 American Lacrosse) in the Carrier Dome on Sunday at 1 p.m.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU’s seniors have contributed an all facets on the team’s current two-game winning streak. Murray and Katie Webster paced the offense with a combined seven goals and four assists, while defenders Glanell, Kasey Mock and Liz Harbeson helped the defense force 38 turnovers.Alyssa Costantino has also shined with eight saves between the pipes.And with one of the most anticipated games of the year up next, Glanell said it would take similar efforts from every senior for the Orange to get the revenge it so desperately wants.“You can compare it as much as you want to the other seasons,” Glanell said, “but it’s going to come down to how we come out on Sunday. It’s going to be different than every other time we’ve played them.”The Class of 2014 can find a small confidence boost from the fact that three of its duels with NU were decided by two goals or fewer, including one in overtime. Still, that’s not enough to erase the frustration from a quartet of setbacks.None has stung more than the championship game loss. After jumping out to a two-goal lead, the Orange surrendered a three-goal outburst at the end of the first half and never recovered. Although Murray will never forget how lucky she was to play in the national final, she said the upperclassmen on the team are still haunted by the 8-6 defeat.“Getting to play in the national championship, but not getting the win was really a horrible feeling in your stomach,” Murray said “It just gives you a little extra drive, especially when you’re playing the team that made you get that feeling in your stomach two years ago.”Adding to the significance of the game is Murray’s familiarity with a number of names on the Northwestern roster. Murray played with NU attack Christina Esposito at West Babylon (N.Y.) Senior High School and has also built acquaintances with Kara Mupo and leading goal-scorer Alyssa Leonard.“It’s good to play people that you know,” Murray said. “It’s really competitive, and you just want those bragging rights.”Syracuse head coach Gary Gait pinpointed winning draw controls as a key to beat the Wildcats. Senior Kirkland Locey and teammate Kailah Kempney struggled in the circle against Maryland on March 10, and Gait said lost opportunities doomed his squad that evening.“We didn’t get to the 50 percent and missed four or five more possessions,” Gait said. “We’ve got to compete in those areas and win those battles.”Glanell said the determining factor will be the Orange’s chemistry and that if all players communicate with one another and do their jobs, the fifth time should be the charm for the seniors. “When everyone’s on the same page, we kill it. We crush it,” Glanell said. “We come out on top when we’re working together, and that’s what it’s all about.” Comments Published on March 22, 2014 at 1:30 pm Contact Tyler: [email protected]dulast_img read more

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In Red Bank, Business District Signage Get a Look-Over

first_imgBy John BurtonRED BANK – Local legislation regulating business district signage is meeting resistance from the business community, and may prohibit some signs designed by the ordinance’s main supporter.The Borough Council at its Feb. 24 meeting introduced an ordinance that revises the long-standing one regulating signs in the business districts as well as the borough’s historic district, which includes much of the downtown commercial Special Improvement District, and meet the standards of the borough master plan, intending to protect the district.The proposed ordinance would regulate the size and scope of signs, as well as the maximum height they would be permitted on buildings, among other restrictions.Another provision of the ordinance is that it does not allow internally illuminated signs.The ordinance is the work of the council’s code enforcement committee, chaired by Republican Councilwoman Cindy Burnham, with Burnham and the committee having spent two and a half years and roughly $18,000, with most of the money going to pay a professional planner.Of the ordinance, Burnham said “We accomplished what we set out to do,” which was to revise the long-on-the-books ordinance and simplify it. “Maybe not to everyone’s satisfaction. But you can’t please all the people all the time.”Burnham a couple of weeks ago announced she had worked unilaterally with Red Bank Flavour, a former coalition of borough restaurant owners who worked to promote their businesses, for the businesses to pay for a series of signs that would direct visitors to downtown municipal parking lots. The signs, which Burnham said she designed, however, would be internally illuminated and lighted in the evenings, and hung from street side lampposts.Councilman Edward Zipprich, a Democrat, was critical of Burnham’s actions and pointed out that the signs would violate Burnham’s ordinance. While appreciating that businesses may feel the signs directing visitors would help local businesses – “We support that,” he said – Zipprich took Burnham to task for her actions.“Cindy, taking charge, getting somebody to buy these signs and telling everybody she can do whatever she wants to do,” Zipprich said, “that’s not proper protocol.”Zipprich added, “I think if we approve the signage to the parking in the downtown it should be compliant with how the ordinance reads and protect the historic district.”“He’s wrong,” Burnham countered. “We’re not talking about store signs; we’re talking about traffic control signs.” She believed these signs would be exempt from the ordinance restrictions as a public service.Burnham also accused Zipprich of “playing politics.”“Come on Ed,” she answered. Do the best thing for the town, what’s right for Red Bank.”Borough attorney Jean Cipriani, was on vacation this week and unavailable to untangle the legalities of the ordinance.Red Bank RiverCenter, the management and advocacy organization for the borough commercial Special Improvement District, has its own reservations with the ordinance. There were a few specific points that RiverCenter objected, including the prohibition of internally illuminated signs, said the organization’s executive director, James Scavone. But, “In general, the ordinance itself is just too overwhelming and very confusing,” and may pose too onerous for future businesses thinking of relocating to the borough, he added.Scavone is encouraging the governing body to again review the proposal, “to see if there is another way to simplify the ordinance.” He suggested Red Bank look at Princeton’s comparable ordinance, just about six pages (as opposed to Red Bank’s 11-page ordinance), and use it as a template.“We simplified it,” from where it started, Burnham maintained, charging that RiverCenter and businesses “want to come in and do whatever they want here.”Mayor Pasquale Menna, a Democrat, agreed with Scavone, believing, “It’s still too bureaucratic, too long, too confusing and to apply it would be extremely expensive.”On the other hand, Menna continued, he likes Burnham’s parking signs and believes businesses should be permitted to use the illuminated signs. “As far as I’m concerned, any advertising mechanism that is commonly recognized in the industry should be available for their use in order to remain competitive and to keep a viable downtown,” Menna said.The borough attorney is comparing this ordinance to Princeton’s and may make recommendations. The borough planning board will have to review it, as well, before it returns to the council for its consideration and vote, officials said.last_img read more

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