Radio stations closed in eastern DRC, others threatened

first_img February 18, 2021 Find out more June 13, 2016 Radio stations closed in eastern DRC, others threatened Democratic Republic of CongoAfrica Condemning abuses Economic pressureFreedom of expression Democratic Republic of CongoAfrica Condemning abuses Economic pressureFreedom of expression Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the closure or threatened closure of several radio stations in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo in the past few days on bureaucratic grounds. RSF believes the aim is to put pressure on the media and prevent hostile reactions to the now unavoidable postponement of the presidential election initially planned in October 2016 . RSF_en News Receive email alerts News February 24, 2021 Find out more Organisation Newscenter_img Reporter jailed in DRC for allegedly defaming parliamentarian to go further News Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Democratic Republic of Congo In the latest case, radio stations in the Baraka region of the eastern province of Sud-Kivu were notified on 8 June that they will be closed if they do not pay 1,500 US dollars for a “broadcast permit.” This is a large sum for what are mainly community radio stations and most will be unable to pay. The head of the department of posts and telecommunications in the city of Baraka said the order came from the central administration and is meant to be applied throughout the country.In Bukavu, the capital of Sud-Kivu province, Radio Iriba FM was forcibly closed on 2 June on the orders of the provincial tax department on the grounds that it had not paid all its taxes. The station’s director, Donat Musema, is contesting the order and says he has paid most of his taxes, unlike other radio stations in Bukavu that are still operating. He regards its closure as a political reprisal for the fact that he sometimes interviews opposition representatives. Musema has been the target of frequent harassment and even death threats, for which a government employee was convicted in March. Meanwhile, Radio Paon, a community radio station in Munguredjipa, in the neighbouring eastern province of Nord-Kivu, is the victim of an act of censorship by soldiers and members of the National Intelligence Agency (ANR), who arrested the station’s manager, Aimé Kibendelwa, on 4 June and confiscated its transmitter. Kibendelwa was released on 7 June after MONUSCO, the United Nations mission in the DRC, intervened but the ANR is refusing to return the transmitter and is demanding 500 US dollars for it.“The authorities have acted without reference to the courts in these three cases,” RSF said. “This is a complete violation of the DRC’s law, which says that only a prosecutor has the power to close a media outlet. In the currently very tense political situation, it is vital that such politically-motivated intimidation of the media should stop, so that that they are free to do their job of providing news and information.”In a separate development, mobile phone companies have announced an increase in Internet service tariffs ranging from 35 to 500 percent, causing panic in the journalistic community, which largely relies on mobile Internet services to transmit and receive information. Tariff hikes on this scale would also limit the public’s ability to follow the news online, as most Congolese lack fixed-line Internet connections at home. The deputy minister responsible for Internet matters said he would examine the announced hikes, which seem to have been coordinated and, if so, would violate the rules on competition.The DRC is ranked 152nd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2016 World Press Freedom Index. Congolese reporter wounded by gunshot while covering protest in Goma JUNIOR KANNAH / AFP Journalist arrested on provincial governor’s orders February 16, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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University to evacuate Cairo abroad students

first_img Notre Dame’s decision to evacuate the students was in response to a U.S. State Department recommendation. Twelve Notre Dame students are participating in Notre Dame’s study abroad program at the American University of Cairo (AUC). The students in Cairo had no access to Internet or mobile phone connections last week, but Notre Dame’s Office of International Studies (OIS) received a Friday voicemail when AUC officials allowed students to make one-minute phone calls from landlines. The students arrived in Cairo Jan. 20 to begin their semester of study at AUC. U.S. government-arranged transportation from Cairo to safe haven locations in Europe is scheduled to begin Monday, according to a notice from the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. “OIS has received a voicemail from one of our Cairo students, calling on behalf of all of them,” the note stated. “They are all safe at the student residence in Zamalek. … They are obeying the curfew and, as instructed, have not ventured from their residences nor in anyway been involved in any of the protests. There are AUC officials in residence at Zamalek that are there to act as advisors to our students.” In a Jan. 29 emergency website announcement, AUC stated that, “due to the circumstances in Egypt,” classes and activities were cancelled until at least Feb. 2.center_img “Notre Dame is collaborating with AUC and U.S. officials to have the students transported with other American citizens as soon as possible on government-arranged transport to safe havens in Europe, from where they will be assisted by Notre Dame to locations in which they will be able to safely continue their studies,” the press release stated. In a website update directed toward parents of students in Cairo, OIS said the students were safe in their residences. Notre Dame students also placed short phone calls Sunday when they learned they were leaving Cairo. The University will evacuate Notre Dame students from Cairo due to ongoing protests and violence in Egypt, according to a University press release.last_img read more

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Demand Dwindles for U.S. Forces in Haiti, Official Says

first_imgBy Dialogo February 22, 2010 The need for U.S military forces in Haiti is dwindling as Haitian authorities and nongovernmental organizations begin to accept a greater share of relief efforts in the ravaged country, an American military official said. About 13,000 U.S. troops are involved in the earthquake-relief effort — with 7,000 forces on the ground — down from a peak overall level of about 20,000 at the start of this month, Army Lt. Gen. P.K. “Ken” Keen, the top U.S. commander in Haiti, told Pentagon reporters today. “As we see this transition occurring, we see our civilian partners increase their capabilities — both the government here in Haiti as well as the nongovernment organizations — and we see the need for our military assistance dwindling,” Keen said via video teleconference from the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince. The update on Haiti’s recovery comes about a month after a magnitude 7 earthquake struck the Caribbean nation, creating what an official called one of the greatest humanitarian emergencies in the history of the Americas. U.S. aid began pouring into affected areas in the immediate aftermath, but a greater share of relief efforts has been transferred to partners as conditions progress. The American commander declined to describe a timeline or expected scope of the U.S. military presence in Haiti, saying conditions in the country would determine the response. “As we look at our military requirements in supporting [the U.S. Agency for International Development] and the government of Haiti,” Keen said, “we’re dialing it back where unnecessary as we right-size the force as requirements are needed on the ground, and we’re dialing it up where it’s necessary, based upon the needs on the ground.” Keen estimated military operations to date have totaled about $250 million.last_img read more

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Venezuelan Exodus Worries Latin America

first_imgBy Gustavo Arias Retana/Diálogo October 19, 2018 Thousands of Venezuelans are fleeing the unstable government of Nicolás Maduro, migrating to Latin American countries. According to Eric L. Olson, deputy director of the Wilson Center’s Latin American Program, the exodus is considered the worst migration crisis in the region in the last 50 years. Several countries face housing, xenophobia, and organized crime challenges, created by the massive migration wave. According to the United Nations (UN), 2.3 million Venezuelans live abroad and 1.6 million have left since 2015, when the crisis worsened under Maduro’s rule. Colombia is the main destination, where more than a million Venezuelans live. Peru, Chile, Ecuador, Argentina, Panama, and Brazil also face substantial migration flows. According to Rafael Uzcátegui, general coordinator of the non-governmental organization Venezuelan Program of Education-Action on Human Rights, the situation is not new. “It intensified in the last several months due to economic and social problems the country is going through,” he told Diálogo. “People are leaving Venezuela not only because of political reasons; they also escape civil insecurity and the economic crisis,” Uzcátegui said. “There were five migration waves: first, businesspeople; second, middle-class dissidents; third, political refugees; fourth, lower-class people; and most recently, quite particular, former government officials and supporters of Chavism.” Faced with the situation, the region must respond to the immediate challenge of sheltering Venezuelans and ensuring access to basic health and protection. “Countries of the region put into place several mechanisms to regularize the situation of Venezuelan migrants, so they can access basic services, such as health, education, and work,” Olga Sarrado, spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in Venezuela, told Diálogo. “Now, more than 727,000 Venezuelans hold a permit that regularizes their stay in the host nation. Since 2014, more than 336,000 Venezuelans sought asylum around the world.” Colombia, Peru, and Ecuador request a Venezuelan passport or a special permit to enter and remain on their soil. To enter Chile and Panama, Venezuelan migrants need a visa issued by a consulate. Brazil only requires an ID, although Brazilian authorities have already considered restricting Venezuelans’ entry. Maduro’s government denies the emergency and organized staged repatriations on TV. In late August, Venezuelan Minister of Communication Jorge Rodríguez told the press that the crisis in Venezuela was “fake news spread by xenophobic, racist governments.” Exposed to organized crime Sarrado and Uzcátegui agree that one of the main concerns Venezuelan migration brings to the region is criminal gangs trying to take advantage of the dire situation. Uzcátegui explained that problems start when Venezuelans try to obtain a passport to leave the country, as the black market takes advantage of the difficulty to obtain legal documents. “Leaving without a passport makes it difficult to get to any country, and nowadays Venezuelans leave without a valid passport, because the chain of corruption prevents them from getting one legally. They have to buy passports on the black market at prices ranging from $800 to $1,200,” he said. Venezuelans, once out of the country with or without passports, continue to fall prey to organized crime. UNHCR detected networks linked to human trafficking and sexual exploitation that take advantage of the migrants’ vulnerable situation, Sarrado said. “Venezuelans, especially those with irregular situations, are exposed to great risks such as human trafficking, sexual and labor exploitation, or recruitment by illegal groups,” he said. Xenophobia and social tension The spread of xenophobia and acts of violence are other challenges Venezuelans face in host nations. Discrimination can be flagrant, especially when the wave of arrivals is concentrated in areas with a sluggish economy. In August 2018, people in the border state of Roraima, Brazil, through which most Venezuelans enter the country, attacked a makeshift camp of about 2,000 immigrants. The attackers were neighbors claiming that four Venezuelans had hit and robbed a Brazilian shopkeeper. In Peru, attacks against Venezuelans increased. Derogatory name-calling on social media and in the streets is the main form of aggression against migrants who arrive in the Andean country. “These retaliations happened in similar contexts, and could be mitigated if policies to welcome immigrants and an understanding of why they cannot stay in their country exist,” said Uzcátegui. “These cases could be contained if there were enough information available for citizens on the seriousness of the humanitarian emergency in Venezuela, information that would awaken solidarity. But governments of receiving nations should also guarantee that formal inclusion offers more advantages than maintaining an irregular status, including no repatriation, access to documentation and education, health, and employment,” he concluded.last_img read more

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4 signs your boss is ready for you to hit the road

first_imgIf you feel like your boss no longer wants you around, you could be right. There’s nothing worse than losing your job and not seeing it coming. If you don’t want losing your job to come as a surprise, here are some warning signs that your boss is ready for you to go…They don’t want you to succeed: Did you just do something awesome? Did you finish an amazing project or finalize a big sale? Most bosses would be ecstatic about that. If your boss seems annoyed or irritated, it may be because he doesn’t like that you’re not giving him any reason to let you go.They talk about you behind your back: It’s not professional to complain about someone behind their back. If you find out from your coworkers that your boss is doing this, it’s definitely a bad sign.They start analyzing everything you do: The best bosses don’t micromanage, so if your boss suddenly starts to do that, they might be looking for a reason to let you go. If you’re also receiving constructive feedback, they might just be trying to help you improve. But if not, they’re probably trying to find a reason to justify your dismissal.They start giving you all the worst assignments: By giving you horrible assignments, your boss could be trying to wear you down. Either you’ll get distraught and quit or your work quality will suffer and they’ll have a reason to let you go. Either way, constantly giving you the worst projects might be their way of driving you out. 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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BOCES Summer Youth Employment Program helps non-profits

first_img“It’s for kids who are in a certain economic bracket to get jobs to work over the summer,” said BOCES Center for Career and Technical Excellence Principal Matt Sheehan. Three additional beds are being built for sensory gardens, filled with materials like sand and stones. At the center, teens are building six garden beds for students and staff to grow produce in the fall. “A lot of the kids who end up in this school are not coming from a rural setup; they’re coming more from an urban. So them seeing that is important and then being able to do it, it’s attainable,” said Sheehan. “The most important part of this is not so much giving them jobs, but teaching them how to get jobs. That concept of what a job is, learning work skills and readiness skills, and how to apply,” said Sheehan. APALACHIN (WBNG) — Teens in the Broome-Tioga BOCES Summer Youth Employment Program are finishing up work Thursday. “We’ve been making picnic tables, and we were working on power tools and making the garden beds. And we were working on birdhouses,” said Union-Endicott student Dominic Rose, who is involved in the program. The program hires teens between the two counties, placing them at different non-profits around the area to help complete projects. On average, 250 kids join the Summer Youth Employment Program, but due to the pandemic, this year 140 teens are participating. One of the sites this summer is the BOCES West Learning Center in Apalachin. The program is a partnership between Broome-Tioga BOCES and DSS.last_img read more

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Great-grandmother, 97, becomes Brazil’s oldest coronavirus survivor

first_imgWhen 97-year-old Brazilian Gina Dal Colleto was hospitalized on April 1 with coronavirus symptoms, few could have thought she would survive the deadly virus.On Sunday, however, Dal Colleto was pushed in a wheelchair out of Sao Paulo’s Vila Nova Star hospital to applause from doctors and nurses, becoming the oldest known survivor of COVID-19 in Brazil, the Latin American country worst-hit by the outbreak.Her unexpected recovery was a ray of hope in Brazil, where the coronavirus has laid bare a stretched public health system and exposed fierce political debate over how to best tackle the virus’ spread and prop up the country’s economy. The sole survivor of an Italian family comprising 11 siblings, Dal Colleto lived alone in the port city of Santos, Rede D’Or São Luiz, which controls the Vila Nova Star hospital, said in a statement.”Even with almost a century of life, Gina has a very active routine and enjoys walking, shopping and cooking,” the statement said. “She has six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.”While she was hospitalized, Dal Colleto was put on oxygen and admitted to intensive care, the statement said.On Sunday, Brazil’s health ministry said 1,223 people had died as a result of the outbreak, 99 more than the previous day’s total. Brazil now has 22,169 confirmed cases. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right former army captain, has chafed at social distancing measures imposed by state governors and even his own health officials. He wants the economy restarted, arguing that extended shutdowns pose a greater risk than a disease he calls a “little cold.”However, that stance has cost him in the polls and most nights, in cities across Brazil, quarantined Brazilians are banging pots and pans in protest at his handling of the crisis.On Sunday, Bolsonaro said he thought that the coronavirus was on its way out of Brazil, although he gave no explanation. In its place, he added, was coming further unemployment.”It seems that the virus issue is starting to go away, but unemployment is coming … hard. We must fight these two things,” he said in a televised call with religious leaders. center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Police Officer Involved In Breonna Taylor Shooting Fired

first_imgLOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The Louisville Metro police department has fired one of the police officers involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor, more than three months after the 26-year-old Black woman was killed in her home.A termination letter sent to Officer Brett Hankison released by the city’s police department Tuesday said Hankinson violated procedures by showing “extreme indifference to the value of human life” when he “wantonly and blindly” shot 10 rounds of gunfire into Taylor’s apartment in March. The letter also said Hankison, who is white, violated the rule against using deadly force.Taylor was shot eight times by officers who burst into her Louisville home using a no-knock warrant during a March 13 narcotics investigation. The warrant to search her home was in connection with a suspect who did not live there, and no drugs were found inside.The no-knock search warrant that allows police to enter without first announcing their presence was recently banned by Louisville’s Metro Council.The letter said Hankison fired the rounds “without supporting facts” that the deadly force was directed at a person posing an immediate threat.“I find your conduct a shock to the conscience,” interim Louisville Police Chief Robert Schroeder said in the letter. “Your actions have brought discredit upon yourself and the Department.”The announcement comes after Mayor Greg Fischer said last week that Schroeder had started termination proceedings for Hankison while two other officers remain on administrative reassignment as the shooting is investigated.Sam Aguiar, an attorney for Taylor’s family, previously said the move to fire Hankison was long overdue. “It’s about damn time,” he said, adding Hankison was an officer who “plagued our streets and made this city worse for over a dozen years.”“Let’s hope that this is a start to some good, strong criminal proceedings against Officer Hankison, because he definitely deserves to at least be charged,” Aguiar added.Protesters calling for justice in Taylor’s shooting have taken their calls to the streets amid the international protests over racism and police violence after the death of George Floyd, a Black man who died after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck for several minutes as he pleaded for air.This month, Beyoncé also joined the call for charges against officers involved in Taylor’s death. The singer sent a letter to Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, saying the three Louisville police officers “must be held accountable for their actions.”“Your office has both the power and the responsibility to bring justice to Breonna Taylor, and demonstrate the value of a Black woman’s life,” said the letter released on the singer’s website.last_img read more

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Ladies Night Out

first_imgMore than 150 women recently gathered at Branches in West Long Branch to celebrate Ladies Night Out, Monmouth Medical Center’s annual women’s health event. The free event featured health information tables, free giveaways and door prizes, makeup tips from Macy’s by Appointment cosmeticians and showcased a panel of Monmouth Medical Center physician experts who discussed today’s most vital women’s health issues and offered an overview of the latest technological advances. Above, Eatontown resident Mary Ann McKean speaks during the event with Dr. Peter M. Farrugia, a Monmouth Medical Center interventional cardiologist who specializes in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease.last_img read more

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UPDATED: White Rock rocks Trail Allstars at BC Little League Championships

first_imgWhite Rock scored runs in the first three innings en route to a 9-2 victory over West Kootenay Allstars from Trail on opening day at the BC Little League Championships Saturday in Victoria. Trail Allstars open BC Championships Saturday against White Rock The Trail Allstars, with players from Trail, Castlegar, Nelson Baseball Association and Salmo, open the BC Major Championships Saturday in Victoria with a game against White Rock. Trail also played in tournaments in Lethbridge and Kalispell, Montana. Trail Allstars now faces Little Mountain from Vancouver Monday at noon before playing Highlands, New Westminster, Layritz and host Beacon Hill to complete the round robin draw. The BC Champ represents the province at the Canadian Championships with the winner advancing to represent Canada in the Little League World Series in Williamsport Pennsylvania. Trail Allstars scored singles in the third and fourth to cut into the deficit. However, White Rock scored a pair in the top of the fifth to put the game away. The Trail Allstars include players, Cody Wert, Izack Dawson, Koa Wintraub of Nelson, Connor Stainer, Chance Fisher, Jake Maniago, Reid Gerrand, Brady Augustin of Nelson, Nathan Dann, Calvin Morrison, Landan Uzeloc, Aiden Paterson and Tyler O’Keefe. The Lower Mainland squad jumped on West Kootenay starter Koa Wintraub for a single in the first frame and four in the second to chase the Nelson pitcher from the game. The Major Allstars, ages 11-12 years, enter the tournament riding a 13-4 season record after clinching the Chewelah, Washington tournament title Sunday with a victory over Spokane Dodgers. Cody Wert had an RBI single for the Allstars. The BC Champ represents the province at the Canadian Championships with the winner advancing to represent Canada in the Little League World Series in Williamsport Pennsylvania. The Provincials are hosted by Beacon Hill in Victoria and runs to Sunday, July 30 when the tournament champion will be crowned. The coaching staff includes assistants Mike Boisvert, Jim Maniago and head coach DJ Ashman. Trail plays White Rock at 6 p.m. Saturday, then meets Little Mountain Monday at noon. The Allstars play Highlands Tuesday at noon; New Westminster Wednesday at 3 p.m.; host Beacon Hill Thursday at 6 p.m. before concluding the round robin draw with a game Friday at 3 p.m. against Layritz.last_img read more

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