Submarine USS Michigan Gets New Commander

first_img Share this article December 18, 2013 Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today Submarine USS Michigan Gets New Commander center_img USS MICHIGAN (SSBN 727) AT NAVAL SUBMARINE BASE BANGOR, WASH.The Gold Crew of guided-missile submarine USS Michigan (SSGN 727) welcomed a new commanding officer as Capt. Benjamin Pearson relieved Capt. Robert James during a ceremony at the Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor Chapel, Dec. 17.James, who assumed command of the Gold Crew in Nov. 2011, participated in overseas exercises with foreign militaries and took the ship from a dry dock maintenance period to once again being a forward-deployed asset.“I think we can all learn something about the institution of command from commanders like Bob James,” said Capt. Charles Logan, commander of Submarine Squadron 19. I would ask officers that are in their first command tour to consider the path taken by Bob and Ben both for the significant challenge of this job as an SSGN CO, but also the sheer joy of serving with a crew like Michigan Gold and the significant satisfaction attained by completing such a challenging tour filled with achievement.”James spoke of Michigan Gold Crew’s successes and memorable moments during his command tour.“It is the crew that deserves all of the credit,” said James. “Something I recognized way back when I started this path was that for me to be successful I needed to build teams and build up people so they are successful. Thereby I will be successful, and I can say that you all definitely fulfilled that. You are the reason I am successful.”As his last official act as CO James meritoriously advanced two of his Sailors under the command advancement program (CAP), one to petty officer 1st class and the other to petty officer 2nd class.“I’ve learned a lot of great things from the captain and after almost 13 years of this, I can’t say I’ve worked for a better one,” said the newly advanced Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Vernon Deschene. “Being capped took me by surprise. There were a lot of really deserving people and I’m just very honored, excited, and happy. I thank Captain James for everything he has done, and I wish him the best of luck.”Pearson comes to Michigan Gold from the Chief of Naval Operations staff, where he served as Branch Head for Plans, Liaison, and Assessment for the Director of Undersea Warfare.“I am excited to take over as your commanding officer,” said Pearson to his crew. “We have an amazing ship that provides the nation with a huge arsenal of weapons at our disposal. We owe it to our country to be ready when needed and my goal is to ensure we are in fighting shape as we complete our training cycle and deploy to the Western Pacific.”SSGNs provide the Navy with an unprecedented combination of strike and special operation mission capabilities within a stealthy, clandestine platform. Armed with tactical missiles and equipped with superior communications capabilities, SSGNs are capable of directly support dozens of Special Operation Forces.[mappress]Press Release, December 18, 2013; Image: Navy Submarine USS Michigan Gets New Commanderlast_img read more

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Panama Commits To Fight Against Drug Trafficking

first_img Panamanian authorities have declared war on drug trafficking and organized crime. Officials carried out the largest narcotics seizure of the year earlier this month when the National Naval Air Service of Panama (SENAN) captured a speed boat that crashed into a seafront house in the city of Colón, on the Caribbean Sea. SENAN officials found more than 2,400 kilos (5,280 pounds) of cocaine on the vessel. A Colombian national was arrested, but the other three crew members on the boat managed to escape. “It doesn’t seem coincidental to me that north of Veraguas [155 miles west of Panama City] there are 15 people in custody for having links to drug trafficking,” Minister of Public Safety José Raúl Mulino told reporters, according to EFE. “This shipment [contained] ski masks, knives and military ammunition apparently for these people.” Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli said the region needs a strategic counter-narcotics policy, during a summit of the Central American Integration System (SICA) earlier this month in El Salvador. “Many people die unnecessarily due to drugs, the same drugs that prompt corruption and discourage investment,” said Ricardo Martinelli, as reported by the Panamanian daily La Prensa. In 2009, Panamanian law enforcement agencies confiscated 52.1 tons of cocaine and 1.7 tons of marijuana, according to the Public Ministry. Officials also said US$11 million in cash was seized, US$3.2 million more than the previous year. Javier Caraballo, the country’s drug prosecutor, said authorities have identified Mexican criminal organizations in Panama that are working with Mexico-based drug cartels. But he added the seizures by Panamanian officials have decreased the illegal activities of national and international criminal organizations. “We have seen cases in which almost all the people apprehended, linked to these shipments, are Mexicans that don’t have a permanent residence in the country,” said Caraballo, as reported by EFE. “However, they arrived [in the country] to organize drug trafficking.” An undercover agent from the Judicial Investigations Directorate (DIJ) of the National Police told Infosurhoy.com that criminals from Latin American countries are also in Panama to supervise their illegal businesses. But local law enforcement agencies are trying to prevent them from establishing a presence. “Guatemalans, Hondurans and Colombians are coming [here] to control and oversee their operations on Panamanian territory,” said the narcotics agent, who only spoke on condition of anonymity because her life could be in jeopardy if her identity were revealed. “Now it has become more difficult for them [drug traffickers] to infiltrate ‘agents,’ but they continue to look for new strategies.” The source said that drug seizures in 2009 reflect increased efforts by counter-narcotic agencies and the naval air bases monitoring the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. “The new strategies and operational exercises and coordination with international organizations make drug traffickers find new ways and routes to traffic narcotics,” she said. By Dialogo July 29, 2010last_img read more

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Colombian Military Destroys Four Drug Labs

first_imgBy Myriam Ortega/Diálogo February 14, 2017 Colombian Marines, together with the Army and National Police, seized four drug labs in the Department of Putumayo on January 17th. Criminals used these crude facilities to process cocaine base. The soldiers carried out two operations, the first of which was led by the 30th Battalion in Puerto Guzmán, where three homemade labs were found, and the second by the 33rd Battalion in San Miguel municipality, where they found the fourth processing center. “This effort has been carried out through ongoing operations,” said Colonel Ricardo Alberto Suárez Rátiva, commander of the 3rd Marine Brigade, under whose command is the 33rd Battalion, which leads the operation. He attributes their success to “human and signals intelligence, which is how these illegal activities are able to be detected.” Inside the labs, the Marines found 997 gallons of liquid ingredients and 680 kilograms of dry supplies meant for processing cocaine base. The authorities carried out a controlled destruction of the materials on-site. In press releases, the Colombian Navy indicated that “in 2016, the Southern Naval Force moved ahead with a standing offensive against this scourge in its jurisdiction, destroying 145 processing centers, over 57 million gallons of liquid ingredients, and 32,000 kilograms of dry supplies.” In 2017, 10 of those labs have already been disabled. Teamwork Col. Suárez attributes the success of this and other missions to the Colombian Armed Forces’ teamwork. “The Third Brigade has four tactical units, meaning four battalions. We carry out operations with Army units, according to the sector of the river where they are located. Since I command one of the Marine Corps’ brigades, I have responsibility for the rivers, which depending on the sector can be the Putumayo, the Caquetá, or the Caguán River. These actions are performed by Army units, with the support of the Air Force, in order to ensure resounding success.” According to Army General Adolfo Hernández, such joint action starts from the very moment of formation of each military detachment. He commands the 27th Jungle Brigade, which has jurisdiction over the department of Putumayo and Bota Caucana. “Something that helps to reinforce this culture of joint action within the different service branches is Proyecto Púrpura (Project Purple), which was instituted in the various service academies for the purpose of getting students to interact together early on in their careers. Today we have members from the other service branches in the Army, Naval, and Air Force academies. There they create teamwork opportunity spaces, and later we see those results reflected in the theater of operations.” The skills brought by each corps are added together, resulting in the optimization of resources, Gen. Hernández added. “Our teamwork has facilitated joint efforts, and through teamwork, we have saved resources. The creation of intelligence bubbles — where all branches bring to the table information about a given target, such as drug trafficking, as well as other potential targets that we may confront — has also been important. In that space, each committee contributes its understanding of how an operation could be carried out and whether it calls for execution by a single service branch, so that resources are more efficiently and forcefully used in meeting the objective.” Coca in Putumayo According to the “Monitoring Report on Territories Affected by Illicit Crops” in Colombia, a study by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), 64 percent of coca crops detected as of December 31, 2015, are concentrated in the departments of Nariño, Putumayo, and Norte de Santander. At the time, 20,068 hectares in Putumayo were used for the cultivation of coca. In the face of such a daunting challenge “the goal is to keep carrying out operations and this involves constant, ongoing searches of the river area under our brigade’s responsibility — the Caquetá, Putumayo, Cagüán, Ortegüaza, Mecaya, and Sencella rivers — where our operations are appropriately conducted,” Col. Suárez added. “The Colombian Army has excellent relations with the Ecuadorian, Peruvian, and Brazilian armies. We remain in constant contact for carrying out coordinated military operations, and here in Colombia, those efforts aid us in our fight against various transnational crimes taking place on our borders. Here in Putumayo, we have two legal border crossings, where people from Puerto Leguizamo and San Miguel can cross. But along the length of the Putumayo River, the Colombian, Ecuadorian, and Peruvian marines conduct ongoing surveillance, coordinate certain operations when they have information about a crime along the border, and take coordinated action against it,” Gen. Hernández reiterated.last_img read more

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50Hertz Connects Arkona and Wikinger to Its Transmission Grid

first_imgTransmission system operator, 50Hertz, has connected the offshore wind farms Wikinger and Arkona off the island of Rügen to its transmission grid just in time for their commissioning. The Wikinger offshore wind farm is operated by Iberdrola while Arkona is operated by E.ON and Equinor.After three years of construction and a total investment volume of approximately EUR 1.3 billion, renewable energy is now flowing to the Lubmin substation during trial operation. From here it is supplied to the consumers via three 90 kilometers long submarine cables.“We congratulate E.ON and Equinor for the successful commissioning of their first wind farm in the German Baltic Sea and are proud of our cooperation as partners in the construction of the joint Arkona offshore substation”, said 50Hertz CEO, Dr Frank Golletz. “This offshore platform has set a new standard. We will also continue the good European relationship during the operation of the wind farm. We would especially like to thank the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH) and the State of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, who always act as reliable supporters for the offshore projects and their connection. We are also counting on this well-established cooperation for future projects.”The connection of offshore wind farms Wikinger and Arkona, currently the largest investment project of 50Hertz, started in 2015 and is made at the Lubmin substation.For the first time in the Baltic Sea, a grid connection was implemented as a 220 kV three phase current system, enabling a higher power transfer. Until now, the connections of offshore wind farms in the German Baltic Sea consisted of 150 kV three-phase cable systems. At the Lubmin substation, the current is transformed to 380 kilovolts and fed into the 50Hertz transmission system, the company explained.last_img read more

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Total picks Maersk drillship to drill at ‘deepest water depth ever drilled offshore’

first_imgFrench oil major Total has selected a Maersk Drilling-owned drillship to drill at what the rig owner says will be a world record water depth in Angola-Namibia campaign. Maersk Drilling said on Tuesday that it had been awarded contracts for a three-well exploration drilling project by Total E&P Angola Block 32, Block 48 and Total E and P Namibia B.V. for the 7th generation drillship Maersk Voyager.The Maersk Voyager will be employed offshore Angola and Namibia for a campaign which includes the deepest water depth ever drilled offshore, the rig owner said.The project includes two wells offshore Angola in Blocks 32 and 48, plus one well offshore Namibia. The campaign is expected to start in January 2020, with an estimated duration of 240 days.The total value of the firm contracts is approximately $46.3m, including a mobilization fee. The contracts include two additional one-well options.Maersk said that the well in Angola’s Block 48 would be drilled at a new world record water depth of 3,628 m. According to the drilling contractor, the current world record is 3,400 m, set by Maersk Voyager’s sister drillship Maersk Venturer when it drilled the Raya-1 well for Total offshore Uruguay in 2016.Morten Kelstrup, COO of Maersk Drilling, said: “We are thrilled to once again push beyond existing boundaries in collaboration with Total, drawing upon our mutual experience from the exciting deepwater exploration projects we have collaborated on over the years.”Maersk Voyager is a high-spec ultra-deepwater drillship which was delivered in 2014. It has recently performed its scheduled Special Periodic Survey in Walvis Bay, Namibia, after completing campaigns in Ghana and Equatorial Guinea in 2019.last_img read more

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Empty courses throughout Pattaya

first_imgTy Anderson and Willem Lasonder.PSC Golf from SIAM Country Resort PattayaIt was amazing this week how empty the courses were. Perhaps everybody was afraid of the rain. Also, many of our regular players were outside the city. Anyway, we enjoyed the courses where we played. Jonathan Pratt and Dave Smith kept each other good in balance in an exciting game. Jonathan was just one shot better than Dave and won with 36 Stableford points.Our venue for Thursday 9th July was Pleasant Valley. The circumstances were better than on Tuesday. We had a sunny day and it became hot after 11 am. The course was in good condition with some wet spots. The greens were bumpy and some were sanded.The results were better than on Tuesday. Ty Anderson was in good shape with a strong front nine with 23 Stableford points. It was too much for the rest of the field to catch him. He won with 39 points. Willem Lasonder was second with 36.Two near pins for Ty Anderson and Willem Lasonder (3X). Please Support Pattaya MailOn Tuesday 7th July we went to The Emerald. It was a cloudy and humid day after a night with heavy rain. We were lucky that we just had a little shower and missed the storm in Pattaya. The course was in good condition, but we had no roll. The greens were not very good, slow and bumpy. Loading…Sponsored Content2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?What Is The Fastest Way To Get 1 Million Followers On Instagram?Some Impressive And Almost Shocking Robots That Exist Promoted ContentThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The WorldbrainberriesThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s HystericalbrainberriesWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?brainberries8 Things That Will Happen If An Asteroid Hits EarthbrainberriesPattaya’s Bunker Boys golfers brave threat of rain for successful week of …Some Impressive And Almost Shocking Robots That ExistbrainberriesHere Are The Top 10 Tiniest Mobile Phones On The Planet!brainberriesThe Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldbrainberriesPattaya Pressure at the Emerald – Pattaya MailThe Great Wall Of China: The Hidden Storybrainberries10 Of The Best Places Around The World To Go Stargazingbrainberries2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearbrainberriesCaptain Cripple achieves high score on wet Pattaya day – Pattaya Mail7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A VegetarianbrainberriesBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Thembrainberrieslast_img read more

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Razor Clam Digs Start Friday at Copalis, Mocrocks

first_imgFacebook25Tweet0Pin0Submitted by The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW)State fishery managers have given the OK for the second razor clam dig this month, this one scheduled to begin Jan. 13 at two ocean beaches.The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the three-day opening at Copalis and Mocrocks after marine toxin tests confirmed the clams on those beaches are safe to eat.The best digging typically occurs one to two hours before low tide, said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager. Digging is not allowed on any beach before noon. The long weekend should provide an excellent opportunity for diggers to visit the coast for clamming, Ayres said. However, he noted the razor clam opening does not include the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday on Monday.The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and evening low tides: Jan. 13, Friday, 7:17 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Copalis, MocrocksJan. 14, Saturday, 7:59 p.m.; -1.0 feet; Copalis, MocrocksJan. 15, Sunday, 8:40 p.m.; -0.4 feet; Copalis, MocrocksUnder state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2016-17 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://www.fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.Both Long Beach and Twin Harbors are closed to razor clam digging due to elevated levels of domoic acid. A natural toxin produced by certain types of algae, domoic acid can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities. WDFW will continue to monitor toxin levels at all ocean beaches.A list of razor clam digs tentatively scheduled through February can be found on WDFW’s website at http://www.wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.last_img read more

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Ladies Night Out

first_imgMore than 150 women recently gathered at Branches in West Long Branch to celebrate Ladies Night Out, Monmouth Medical Center’s annual women’s health event. The free event featured health information tables, free giveaways and door prizes, makeup tips from Macy’s by Appointment cosmeticians and showcased a panel of Monmouth Medical Center physician experts who discussed today’s most vital women’s health issues and offered an overview of the latest technological advances. Above, Eatontown resident Mary Ann McKean speaks during the event with Dr. Peter M. Farrugia, a Monmouth Medical Center interventional cardiologist who specializes in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease.last_img read more

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