Alarm sounded after daily is closed and two of its journalists get two years in prison

first_imgNews Yemeni journalist killed, nine wounded in Aden airport explosions Follow the news on Yemen January 10, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Alarm sounded after daily is closed and two of its journalists get two years in prison RSF_en News January 6, 2021 Find out more February 11, 2021 Find out more YemenMiddle East – North Africa Reporters Without Borders wrote to Yemeni President Ali Abdallah Saleh today voicing great concern about a growing crackdown on the news media in which the independent daily Al Hurriya (“Freedom” in Arabic) was closed for a year by a Sanaa court on 29 December while its editor, Abdulkareem Sabra, and one of its journalists, Abdulqawi Al Qubati, were sentenced to two years in prison with hard labour.The press freedom organisation said it found these measures all the more incomprehensible as President Saleh has on several occasions voiced his support for press freedom and his desire to abolish prison sentences for press offences. “Never has a journalist received such a heavy prison sentence since Yemen was reunified,” Reporters Without Borders said, calling on the Yemeni authorities to reverse these measures and to respect the undertakings they have given as regards the independence of the news media.Sabra and Al Qubati were convicted because of an article criticising the president that appeared on 6 October. The newspaper was already withdrawn from sale in October and its licence was suspended. Aged 60, Sabra is currently hospitalised with diabetes. His home has been put under police surveillance. Al Qubati is a fugitive from justice. Their lawyers have appealed.Their conviction has aroused great concern among Yemeni journalists, who say they have lost confidence in the country’s judicial system and no longer believe in the president’s promises.In response to the court’s one-year closure order, police went to the premises of Al Hurriye on 3 January, evicted all the staff and sealed the entrance. Some 20 journalists and contributors have been put out of work.The most serious other case in recent months has been that of journalist Abdulkarim Al Khaiwani, who was sentenced by a Sanaa court to a year in prison on 5 September in response to a complaint by the Yemeni information ministry accusing his newspaper Al Shoura (“The Advice”) of supporting an anti-government rebellion by Shiite leader Badr Eddin al Hawthi and libelling President Saleh. Al Khaiwani has been held in the main Sanaa prison for the past four months while his newspaper has been put under a six-month closure order. Receive email alertscenter_img News United Nations: press freedom situation “deeply worrying” in Yemen, according to RSF Fixer for foreign reporters held in Aden for past five months February 26, 2021 Find out more Organisation to go further News YemenMiddle East – North Africa Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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Poverty Simulations

first_imgResidents of south Georgia counties are discovering what it means to live in poverty through simulations administered by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.In these simulations, between 50 and 80 attendees are split into groups of varying structures mimicking different family dynamics. On the walls of the room, there are different resources one would find in a city, ranging from a hospital or school to a pawn shop.Families are provided a scenario and their family dynamic, and must live for “a week” in 15 minutes. For example, these families must put themselves in the shoes of a single mother of two who needs to apply for welfare, or a married couple who have just lost their jobs. Families then come back to strategize for the next “week.” After four rounds, they come back and discuss what they’ve learned.“The simulation involves a lot of situations that many people never think about that are issues for people living in poverty,” said Roxie Price, the UGA Extension Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) agent in Tift County, Georgia. “They may have a situation where they have to go to (the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services) and apply for food assistance. There may be a receptionist there that tells them to fill out some paperwork and have a seat, which could take up 10 of their 15 minutes of simulation time.”Price said the goal of the simulation is to get people to empathize with impoverished residents of their county.“It makes more people aware of the fact that there are people who are struggling every day to try to make ends meet,” Price said. “A lot of good comes out of the simulation.”Andrea Scarrow, Southwest District FACS program development coordinator, said both participants and volunteers who assist in the simulations benefit from the program.“There are participants who are just coming out of poverty and others who are facing a financial crisis, among other things,” Scarrow said. “A lot of the simulation hits home with them. Also, the people playing the role of the agencies gain a lot of empathy because they realize that everyone has limited resources.”Marnie Dekle, UGA Extension FACS agent in Candler County, Georgia, who has coordinated simulations in Candler and Evans counties, said that the simulations force participants to make difficult decisions.“The poverty simulation had a great impact on the community because of the circumstances and scenarios that citizens don’t always think about,” Dekle said. “It helps people see things in a different light and to be less judgmental because it’s very hands on.”Kathryn Holland, UGA Extension FACS agent in Colquitt County, Georgia, said the simulations help public service workers tremendously.“It’s always easier to work with someone when you know where they’re coming from,” Holland said. “Our goal is to make the collaboration between the businesses and the services we offer, such as the hospital, more cohesive and effective in serving the community.”While the majority of simulations are geared at adults, Scarrow said local school systems often request them.“They know their students are facing these kinds of situations, and they want to create some empathy among the teachers and the administrators,” Scarrow said. “They gain an understanding of what a family living in poverty is up against.”Rachel Hubbard, UGA Extension FACS agent in Lanier County, Georgia, was one of the first agents to conduct a poverty simulation geared toward high school students. She said the focus was for the youth to understand the importance of obtaining an education.“We want them to see how hard it is to make ends meet with just an average job, and that the more education they have, the more it helps them in life,” Hubbard said. “Every year, we do the simulation with every ninth-grade student in the county.”Mitzi Parker, UGA Extension FACS agent in Sumter County, Georgia, said she does a poverty simulation for Leadership Sumter, a group of citizens that go through 12 weeks of leadership training.“We try to open the business leaders’ eyes about what’s going on in their community,” Parker said. “At the end of the simulation, I pull statistics from Sumter County and I try to tie it into what they just learned. The statistics really help put the poverty situation in perspective for them.”A total of 21.7 percent of the population of Georgia’s 8th Congressional District is below the poverty line, and 27.7 percent of the population is below the poverty line in the 2nd District, according to www.census.gov in 2015. These two districts comprise southwest Georgia. Overall, 17.1 percent of Georgians – about 1.6 million people – live below the poverty line.“It’s reality for a lot of people, but if you’ve had an 8-to-5 job your whole life, it may not register until you go through something like a poverty simulation,” Price said.(Kyle Dawson is an intern at the UGA Tifton Campus.)last_img read more

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Coronavirus: FIFA postpones U-17 Women’s World Cup

first_imgRelatedPosts COVID-19: NCAA to revoke erring airlines licence over non-compliance FRSC to Schools: We’ll arrest, prosecute drivers who flout COVID-19 rules Sanwo-Olu: We’re committed to fulfilling promises to Lagosians The FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup to be held in India in November was on Saturday postponed by the football’s world governing body due to the worsening COVID-19 pandemic. The women’s age group showpiece was to be held at five venues in the country from November 2 to 21. The decision was taken by the FIFA Confederations working group, which was recently established by the Bureau of the FIFA Council to address the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. The working group, according to a FIFA statement decided to “postpone the FIFA Under-20 Women’s World Cup Panama/Costa Rica 2020 – originally scheduled for August/September 2020 – and the FIFA Under-17 Women’s World Cup India 2020 – originally scheduled for November 2020. “New dates will be identified.” The working group includes the FIFA administration and Secretary Generals and top executives from all confederations. It unanimously approved a series of recommendations following its first meeting, which was organised via conference late on Friday. While the tournament itself is five months away but just a few qualifying events have been held so far and the remaining have not been held due to the global health crisis, which has affected more than a million people. Over 50,000 deaths have been caused by the deadly outbreak so far.Tags: COVID-19FIFA U-17 World Cuplast_img read more

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Men’s basketball: Why you need to get over Wisconsin’s heartbreaking defeat

first_imgIt goes without saying that Badger fans were heartbroken following the team’s heartbreaking 61-56 loss Friday in the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament.They were sad — very, very sad.But I am here to tell you, as hard as it may be, to stop being sad because, believe it or not, others in the college basketball world are going through a much tougher time than you are. Badger fans continue to weep after a season of overachieving went wrong in 20 seconds, while other programs severely underachieved.Here are three things to consider as you stop crying over Wisconsin’s crushing defeat:Brazzoni: Missed opportunities paved way for Wisconsin’s heartbreaking collapseFollowing the University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team’s epic collapse against Notre Dame Friday March 25 in the NCAA Sweet Read…1. Look at KansasKansas was easily the most consistent and well-rounded team all season in college hoops. They were a senior-led team that shot as well from the outside as they did on the inside. The Jayhawks were also the clear favorite to win the national championship.There was plenty of optimism in a championship or bust year for Kansas, as fans were confident their team would return to the top for the first time since 2008.Head coach Bill Self and his Jayhawks, however, choked in the Elite Eight. It was one of the more impressive seasons in Kansas’ recent history and they didn’t even have a Final Four to show from it. Talk about actual disappointment.The state of Kansas right now… pic.twitter.com/jWSvvGvUzi— Fake SportsCenter (@FakeSportsCentr) March 27, 2016But not all is lost for Kansas, as while they lose their best player in forward Perry Ellis to graduation, every other important piece to their roster will likely return for another year in the program.2. Look at VirginiaThe stage was set for the Cavaliers.Michigan State, who has been the program’s kryptonite for the past two NCAA tournaments, unexpectedly lost in the first round to No. 15 Middle Tennessee. The next best team, Utah, was blown out by Gonzaga in the next round. After blowing past Iowa State in the Sweet 16, the only thing keep head coach Tony Bennett from the Final Four he has craved for years was a Syracuse team that many thought should have never been in the tournament.Naturally, in true Virginia fashion, the Cavaliers blew a 16-point lead against the Orange in the second half of their regional semifinal.Now, after losing its two top scorers, including one of the country’s best players in guard Malcolm Brogdon, Bennett and Virginia will have to work to replace nearly half of its scoring output.Another year, another missed Final Four for Bennett — despite once again having one of the most talented teams in the country — and another year of depressed Virginia fans.https://twitter.com/_MarcusD_/status/714248415190777856?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw3. Look at WisconsinIt’s been the narrative following this team all tournament: This team is overachieving after pulling off one of the most improbable turnarounds in the history of the sport.They lost to Xavier, a team that they were probably better than, but it also took a pair of miracle outside shots from junior guard Bronson Koenig for them to be in that situation.Men’s basketball: Badgers feel the sting of March, fall in Sweet SixteenIn a span of just 19 seconds, a third straight trip to the Elite Eight slipped out of Wisconsin’s grasp Read…The fact is they lost, and while underachieving teams like Kansas and Virginia will lose key pieces to their failed championship runs, the Badgers will not only likely return every player in their rotation next season, but they also add one piece many fans are forgetting about.Freshman forward Andy Van Vliet out of Belgium will be eligible to play next season, adding yet another offensive threat from both the inside and outside. Van Vliet is skilled far beyond his years, and after adding a bit of muscle to his 6-foot-11 frame this offseason, he will be more than ready for his sophomore season.Wipe your tears away and rest easy, Badger fans. The future is bright, and that’s not a luxury many other programs have at the moment.last_img read more

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East Bengal, Bagan likely to attend stakeholders meeting

first_imgKolkata, May 31 (PTI) Less than a week after threatening to disrupt the Indian Super League (ISL), East Bengal and Mohun Bagan today budged from their stance as drama prevailed over the Big Twos induction into the lucrative franchise tournament. In a volte-face, East Bengal have now confirmed their participation in the stakeholders meeting at AFC headquarters to discuss Indian footballs roadmap. Mohun Bagan are expected to follow suit after another round of joint meeting at Netaji Indoor Stadium with state body Indian Football Association and West Bengal sports minister Aroop Biswas. Maintaining their demand to waive franchise fee and seeking fund from central pool, the two rival clubs on May 27 had echoed “no Mohun Bagan, East Bengal no ISL”, and had threatened to boycott the June 7 meeting if AIFF did not respond. But two days after IFA shot off a letter to the AIFF, the two rival clubs have mysteriously started to toe the line. Blaming the media, East Bengal general secretary Kalyan Majumdar in a stunning volte-face said: “We never said East Bengal would not attend the meeting. We have an invitation and we are definitely going.” His Mohun Bagan counter part Anjan Mitra, known for his softspoken and amiable quality, however, chose to be guarded. “We will have a meeting with East Bengal, IFA and sports minister and then will decide,” Mitra said. PTI TAP ATK ATKlast_img read more

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Toby Flood: ‘Leicester are lacking confidence and a bit of ambition’

first_imgShare on Messenger Share via Email Read more Since you’re here… Richards chooses not to engage when asked about Leicester’s plight but Flood, at 33, is one of the more articulate players around and his views are worth listening to considering the Tigers’ decline has, to a large extent, coincided with his departure. He was the starting fly-half the last time Leicester won the Premiership title, in 2013, and still has a number of friends at Welford Road, none closer than the head coach, Geordan Murphy – a man who increasingly looks like he is carrying the weight of the world on his shoulders.“Of course, I find it hard,” he says. “When you’re at Leicester you are affected by the culture of the place, affected by how they operate and how they are and for those years Leicester v Northampton was as big as it got and they were games you won. I think that was the hard thing to watch and I know it hurt Geordie massively.”Understandably, Flood and Murphy have kept their distance this week, such are the stakes on the match on Friday night. “I would have said ‘good luck’ at the end of the call but it would have been a half-arsed thing,” Flood said. “I wanted to speak to him because he’s a good friend but the reality is that we have our own fight to fight.“It’s a stressful time. You don’t play that many games for Leicester and stay there for so long without carrying the weight of fans, of the board, of himself, of the city – he carries that weight and it’s difficult for him. “They’re lacking confidence and lacking a bit of ambition,” says Flood. “They’re making mistakes that you don’t expect from a team with that much quality. They’ll be coming here and they’ll be nervous, but they’ve won a lot of games up here in the last few years. If we start well, then maybe their self-doubt creeps in. Players playing with doubt is a dangerous thing. That’s where they are and that’s where we were at the beginning of the season.“Win the collisions against Leicester and notoriously they don’t like that. They struggle with that.” … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Premiership interviews Share on Twitter “It will be difficult for his family because he’ll carry it home, take it through the front door and have to live with it. I think he’s a really good fit for Leicester. But for whatever reason, it hasn’t clicked this year.”It has not been clicking for a while and Mike Ford’s arrival did little to reverse their fortunes judging by the 52-20 thumping by Exeter last time out. As a demonstration of just how toxic things have become, the 10-times Premiership champions have this week reported “vile and disgusting” abuse on social media directed at players, including the captain, Tom Youngs, and their families to the police.It has been said a lot of late that Leicester have been left behind, back in an era when their unmistakable physicality helped them dominate the English landscape. “With their recruitment they went away from that a little bit,” Flood says. “They were always physically disgusting [to play against]. Look at players that have gone before – Garforth, Rowntree, the Deacon brothers. Those were guys who were always going to give that intimidation factor and to play behind them was always quite nice fun. They still have that, but that no longer works in professional rugby. You can’t just beat a team up in professional rugby because most of your team is going to be sat on the sofa the next week having received a red card the week before.”It must be said Leicester have an impressive record against Newcastle, having lost twice in 18 meetings, but nine defeats in their past 12 matches is a sequence that looms larger. Reuse this content No one feels Leicester are too good to go down – Tigers have lost their way Newcastlecenter_img Leicester Read more Share on LinkedIn Share on WhatsApp Support The Guardian England’s Dan Robson out for three months with deep vein thrombosis Topics Share on Facebook Toby Flood could take no more. The east Midlands derby last month was half an hour old but the former Leicester fly‑half turned the TV off and took the dog for a walk. Flood has not played for Leicester for five years but the horror show unfolding in front of him as the Tigers were mauled by Northampton was becoming too much.Flood is not the only former Tiger struggling with current events at Welford Road but his admission is relevant because it is he, as Newcastle’s fly-half and co-captain, who can drive Leicester closer to the brink on Friday night. It is distinctly possible – though scarcely believable – that Leicester find themselves bottom of the Premiership table come Saturday evening. It is an enormous match for both sides – Newcastle are bottom, as they have been for most of the season but Dean Richards, another with a deep-rooted link to Leicester, has the Falcons in a degree of form with three consecutive victories before losing to Saracens last time out. The Breakdown: sign up and get our weekly rugby union email. Share on Pinterest Rugby unionlast_img read more

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