MBB : Living in limbo: Former SU players stuck waiting for NBA lockout to end

first_img Comments On a typical game day, Andy Rautins woke up at around 8:30 a.m. and jumped on his elliptical in his New York City apartment. The New York Knicks guard then left his place in the afternoon to get to Madison Square Garden for shootaround and an intense pregame workout.After his workout, he jumped on a bike until it was game time. The Knicks played whatever team came to MSG that night in front of raucous crowd. Win or lose, the players earned their paycheck.‘That’s our life,’ Rautins said. ‘That’s what we enjoy doing. It is a long season of 82 games. It does get a little repetitious at times, but you know it’s what we love to do, and I don’t think we’d rather be doing anything else.’But with the NBA lockout still ongoing, Rautins and six other former Syracuse players have been forced to deviate from their everyday schedules. As of Tuesday, the NBA formally told all teams games were canceled through Dec. 15. The players union disbanded, and the players filed a class-action antitrust lawsuit against the league.Without a season at this point, the players have had to search for other options to play basketball. Some have traveled the country, playing in exhibitions games. Others who weren’t signed before the lockout have gone overseas. For many of them, the lockout even brought them back to their college roots to keep playing the game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textRautins is currently in Los Angeles, working out with professional players like Blake Griffin, Landry Fields, Corey Maggette, O.J. Mayo and Darren Collison, among others.The former Syracuse guard said there is a hotbed of pros in LA at this time and scrimmaging against each other is something that takes place on a daily basis. And while the games are meaningless, everyone competes at a high level.‘These guys are all stars in their own right,’ Rautins said. ‘They’re great players. They’ve been in the league for a long time, so it’s a great learning experience and a great way to stay in shape and on top of your form.’Rautins said other Syracuse guys like Wes Johnson are traveling around the country and playing in pro-am or charity games.Former SU star Carmelo Anthony recently announced he plans to host an all-star charity event in the Meadowlands’ Izod Center, according to an Oct. 20 New York Post article. Some stars already committed to participate in the game include Lebron James, Amar’e Stoudemire, Dwyane Wade and Chris Paul, according to the article.Although most SU players are in different cities at this point, many of them were right in Syracuse, using the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center as a home base for summer workouts.Rautins, along with former players Johnson, Jonny Flynn, Eric Devendorf, Demetris Nichols and Terrence Roberts, scrimmaged with current Syracuse players almost every day in the summer. Rather than training with their NBA teammates, they were training with the current Orange roster.Current SU forward James Southerland said it made him feel like he was a freshman again with those guys around playing pickup games. And although Southerland is now a junior, he knows he still picked things up from the former SU players.‘Even when we’re just playing pickup, they were always teaching us things,’ Southerland said. ‘Wes would always tell me how to cover man-to-man, Andy always telling me keep staying low, running through screens and just making sure you’re shot always falls. They always go hard, and that shows you they’re a difference between the level in college and the NBA.’Freshman Michael Carter-Williams said Johnson and Nichols gave him some advice while they were in Syracuse during the summer.After being a star in high school, he comes off the bench for teammates Scoop Jardine and Brandon Triche this season. He said he was better prepared for this year because of their tutelage.‘Every day I think of what they told me because they made it, and I just want to make it just like them,’ Carter-Williams said.For some former players competing in the NBA Development League or overseas, the lockout hasn’t affected their ability to continue to play professionally.Devendorf was recently drafted by the Idaho Stampede of the NBADL, which is not affected by the lockout. Devendorf is currently preparing for training camp and said though he might not be playing on the biggest stage, it is comforting to know he is playing in some organized league.‘It feels good,’ Devendorf said. ‘I’m ready to play. I’m ready to get going. I know those guys feel the same way, so I’m just happy that I have the opportunity to play somewhere.’For former players Arinze Onuaku, Roberts, Nichols and Darryl Watkins, that opportunity is overseas, associate head coach Bernie Fine said. Rick Jackson, who was not drafted by an NBA team in April, is also playing in Europe.Rautins doesn’t consider that a viable option just yet, though. He said to consider going overseas, the entire season would have to be canceled.And with how things are going, that outcome looks more and more likely.Michael Veley, chair of the SU sport management department, said on Monday that he doesn’t see the players or the owners budging in their demands. As a result, he said he wouldn’t be shocked to see the season canceled.Sport management professor Rick Burton agrees. Because the players union decertified, the time frame to get a deal done will be pushed back.‘Going with the most up-to-date information, if this says to me the players have rejected the deal, my sense is we’re not going to have basketball for a while,’ Burton said Monday.With each day the lockout continues — currently at 140 days — frustration grows among players who just want to get on the court.For Rautins, he just wants to get back to his routine from a year ago with the Knicks. Though he essentially keeps the same schedule out in LA, he said two major things are missing from those pickup games.There are no fans in the bleachers. And there is no paycheck waiting for him.‘It’s tough. It’s really frustrating,’ Rautins said. ‘Everybody’s really opinionated. Everybody got their views. Is it the owners’ fault, is it the players’ fault? Who’s being more stubborn? But at the end of the day, we just want to play.’[email protected] Published on November 16, 2011 at 12:00 pmcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Tempers flare at Trojan football practice

first_imgRedshirt sophomore Trevon Sidney lunges to nab a ball during Wednesday’s practice. (Emily Smith | Daily Trojan)With only nine days left until the first kick off of the season, spirits were high on Howard Johnson Field Wednesday night.The trio of quarterbacks battling for the starting position saw their highest tally of touches so far in practice, but the evening was dominated by a series of scuffles that distracted from a solid performance for the offense.Redshirt junior safety Ykili Ross and redshirt sophomore wide receiver Tyler Vaughns stopped practice early on with a heated shouting match, with Ross finally storming off the field and taking a lap to cool off. He did not return to practice after the confrontation, but spoke to head coach Clay Helton and remained on the sidelines to watch practice. Helton said that Ross “just got upset” and that the issue will not be a problem for either player moving forward.Tensions continued to flare as freshman offensive tackle Liam Douglass and redshirt freshman outside linebacker Hunter Echols threw punches at each other during one-on-one drills, and second-year stars junior wide receiver Michael Pittman Jr. and sophomore safety Bubba Bolden later went head-to-head, tackling each other to the ground before the fight was broken up. Despite the increased chippiness, the mood at practice didn’t seem to faze the coaching staff at all.“It was awesome,” Helton said. “Didn’t it make practice more fun?”Young players continue to stand outRedshirt sophomore wide receiver Trevon Sidney stood out throughout practice, snagging two one-handed grabs and snatching a lengthy catch in the end zone. After several seasons of struggling to get snaps, Sidney’s flashy play in practice seems to signal his readiness to become a solid contributor to the offense.On the opposite side of the ball, freshman cornerback Olaijah Griffin stood out as well, making an interception off redshirt sophomore quarterback Matt Fink and later almost grabbing a second before tumbling out of bounds. In the absence of Jack Jones, Griffin’s performance continues to be a sign of encouragement for the secondary.As part of the opening activities, Helton invited students from across campus to watch the team on Wednesday, and gathered them on the field after practice concluded to talk about the upcoming season.Injury reportRedshirt sophomore offensive lineman Bernard Schirmer was forced to leave practice after suffering what appeared to be a shoulder injury. He left early on to receive examination from trainers, and will undergo an MRI to confirm that there isn’t an injury. Schirmer transferred from junior college amid controversy in March after making headlines for knocking out a referee in a game.Senior running back Aca’Cedric Ware was not in attendance at practice as a precaution due to soreness in his knee. Freshman running back Markese Stepp returned for limited reps while still recovering from a concussion, and senior offensive tackle Chuma Edoga returned to full activity.last_img read more

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Warriors center Andrew Bogut will start second Warriors stint against Pacers

first_img“I didn’t think it would make sense for him to fly across the country after flying across the world so he will probably just meet us in the Bay Area when we get back,” Kerr told reporters. Stephen Curry hails Warriors’ teamwork without Kevin Durant against Rockets Steve Kerr said Andrew Bogut has everything finalized with his visa. As reported earlier, Bogut will join the Warriors when they get back from their trip. Bogut is flying to the Bay Area this weekend pic.twitter.com/bG73VRo1Si— Mark Medina (@MarkG_Medina) March 15, 2019If Bogut does in fact return Thursday, he’ll have 12 regular-season games to get acclimated to the lineup before the postseason begins. Related News Andrew Bogut is expected to make his season debut with the Warriors on Thursday against the Pacers.Golden State coach Steve Kerr said Bogut will return to the Bay Area on Saturday, however, he will not play in the Warriors’ current four-game road trip. Instead, the center plans to join the team Thursday when it hosts Indiana in Oracle Arena, per NBC Sports Bay Area. The 34-year-old veteran is preparing to start his second stint with the Warriors after spending a season in Australia’s NBL with the Sydney Kings.Bogut, selected by the Bucks with the No. 1 overall pick in the 2005 NBA Draft, previously spent four seasons with Golden State and was part of the Warriors’ 2014-15 championship team. He last played in the league with the Lakers during the 2017-18 season.last_img read more

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Death without birth

first_imgLast summer, three weeks before her due date, Sari Edber delivered a stillborn son, Jacob. “He was 5 pounds and 19 inches, absolutely beautiful, with my olive complexion, my husband’s curly hair, long fingers and toes, chubby cheeks and a perfect button nose,” she said. The sudden shift from what she called “a perfectly wonderful healthy pregnancy” to delivering a dead infant was unfathomably painful, said Edber, 27, who lives in Los Angeles with her husband, Daniel. “The experience of giving birth and death at the exact same time is something you don’t understand unless you’ve gone through it,” Edber said. “The day before I was released from the hospital, the doctor came in with the paperwork for a fetal death certificate, and said, `I’m sorry, but this is the only document you’ll receive.’ In my heart, it didn’t make sense. I was in labor. I pushed, I had stitches, my breast milk came in, just like any other mother. And we deserved more than a death certificate.” So Edber joined with others who had experienced stillbirth to push California legislators to pass a bill allowing parents to receive a certificate of birth resulting in stillbirth. During the last six years, 19 states, including New Jersey, have enacted laws allowing parents who have had stillbirths to get such certificates. Similar legislation is under consideration in several more. To thousands of parents who have experienced stillbirth, getting a birth certificate is passionately important, albeit symbolic. “It’s dignity and validation,” said Joanne Cacciatore, an Arizona woman who started the movement after her daughter, Cheyenne, was stillborn 13 years ago. “It’s the same reason why we want things like marriage licenses and baptismal certificates.” But politically, the birth-certificate laws, often referred to as “Missing Angels” bills, occupy uncertain territory, skirting the abortion debate while implicitly raising the question of fetal personhood. Many anti-abortion groups say the laws fill a need for parents. But some abortion-rights supporters see the push for these laws as a barely disguised political move to undermine abortion rights. Last month, Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico vetoed legislation that would have granted stillborn birth certificates. Richardson, a Democrat who is running for president, did not mention abortion but said “confusion and potential fraud” could result from creating two documents – the fetal death certificate and the birth certificate resulting in stillbirth – for the same event. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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