Violence at churches is rare, but ministers remain vigilant

first_img Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal News Service] Standing at the window in her church office, Roberta Karstetter watched the angry man circle the building, checking every door as he looked for a way inside.She had just refused to let him into the offices of Christ Episcopal Church in Delavan, Wisconsin, where she is the parish administrator.“I spoke to him through the glass doors and I just had an uneasy feeling about him, so I wouldn’t unlock the door,” she told ENS in a recent interview. He said he needed help, but he wouldn’t say what kind of help.“He got really belligerent and angry,” Karstetter recalled. He opened his coat, saying, “I don’t have a gun or anything, just let me in.” He began rattling the door.Karstetter decided to walk away and go back upstairs to her office, where she watched the man test every door to get inside.After she was sure he had left, she got in her car and went home, a decision she said she rarely makes.“It just scared me to think what if I let him in,” she said. “I wonder what he did want.”It wasn’t the first time Karstetter had encountered someone at the church who worried her, and it wasn’t the last. For instance, there was the woman who got angry when Karstetter offered her food instead of the money she demanded. The woman drove off, swearing and threatening to burn down the church. Karstetter reported the incident to the police.“She has since been back, just a few weeks ago, asking for assistance again and we told her we’d give her food and not cash, and she said that takes too long,” Karstetter said. “She turned around and walked out mad again, but she didn’t threaten to burn down the church this time.”Those incidents – and others – don’t prevent Karstetter from doing what she’s been doing in one form or another at St. Peter’s for the last 28 years: working at a parish that participates in a church-based rotating homeless shelter and offers a food pantry to supplement a larger community one.“Part of the reason I keep coming back is that 95 percent or more of the people that come here for help are not a physical threat or danger to us at all. It’s just that small percent that get you scared,” she said. “The reason I come back is because you’ve got to love your neighbor as yourself, you know. It’s about the love and compassion that I think God puts in our hearts and part of the Baptismal Covenant that says is to seek and serve Christ in all people and to respect the dignity of every human being. If we treated everybody that came – those 95 percent – as a threat, what kind of message does that give them about the church being open and loving and welcoming to them?”The question of balancing the church’s ministry with the safety of its ministers has been on many people’s mind, once again, since Douglas Franklin Jones, a homeless man, shot church administrative assistant Brenda Brewington and co-rector the Rev. Dr. Mary-Marguerite Kohn inside St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Ellicott City, Maryland, before killing himself earlier this month.Speaking to reporters outside of Kohn’s funeral, Diocese of Maryland Bishop Eugene Sutton said the mourners also remembered “all who are on the front lines of ministry. These are the administrators, the secretaries, those priests who are alone” as their congregation’s sole employee.Sutton also called attention to “a society that’s still has not figured out a way to keep deadly arms out of distressed persons who can do so much harm, and a society that will have people on the streets whom society at large has not cared for, and they end up at the doorsteps of our churches and our churches welcome them — our churches receive them and help them in the name of Christ.”Craig Stuart-Paul, St. Peter’s warden, pledged days after the shootings that the parish’s ministry would continue, “and we won’t do it from behind bulletproof glass.”To that end, the parish recently rededicated itself to its ministry, pledging to “transform” the office where the two women were killed “into an environment that welcomes all people to the church, and provides safety for those who will work there.” The parish also vowed to “reach out in search of the best ideas on how a church may minister to the poor and needy in suburban America” and to work with all of Ellicott City’s faith communities “to provide a hand up to the poor and needy in our neighborhood, developing a plan that is seeded with knowledge and broad community support.”The Rev. Susan Rebecca Michelfelder, currently interim rector at Christ Church in Middletown, New Jersey, told her congregation in a recent sermon that the shooting had left her “truly bereft.”Michelfelder has spent much her in ministry, as she puts it, “in neighborhoods with problems.” She’s been the victim of “smash and grab” crimes while in her car on the way to church. She’s had to warn employees to lock up their valuables or expect them to be stolen by the people the congregation served. She’s worked in a congregation whose pastor wore a bulletproof vest for a time after a mentally ill man burst into the church during a service and threatened to shoot him. A woman once asked her, “what do I have to do, stab you?” when Michelfelder refused to give her money.“Maybe I’m addicted to excitement or something, but I like to be in neighborhoods with problems because there the church can really make a difference and a difference is needed,” she told ENS.The Maryland parish is very much like her current parish in suburban New Jersey.“It could have been us just as easily, absolutely,” she said. Noting that the parish helps run the Calico Cat Thrift Store, Cupboard and Pantry next door to the church, Michelfelder said, “we get scary characters walking in here sometimes, too.”“It is truly a wonder that more of us haven’t been killed in the church office because that is often where people first come for help,” she said during the sermon.There are steps that church workers, and their employers, can take to reduce the chances that an encounter with an unbalanced person will end in tragedy. Some are personal safety choices such as having a can of mace or pepper spray  — or in Karstetter’s case, wasp spray — handy. Some workers resist the temptation to come back to work in the evening to catch up, if it means working alone in the building.Other steps are more institutional: installing adequate lighting, strong locks, video cameras, door bells on doors that are always locked, alarm systems or panic buttons; hiring security guards; and having a code word or phrase for staff to use with each other that indicate help is needed.Security experts suggest limiting the access of non-employees to only certain parts of the building, and knowing who is in the building at all times. Training in how to de-escalate a potentially violent situation is another common suggestion, as is sharing information with colleagues at their church and others in the community about people they encounter.Getting to know the people you serve is crucial, according to Sean Leas, an ex-Marine who is now the property manager at St. James Episcopal Church in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. What he and his colleagues have learned with “even our hardest cases, the ones who may be more of the criminal mind” among the 120 or so people who come to the parish’s weekday Anchorage breakfast program is the power of greeting each one, and wishing them well when they leave.“Eventually with most of them you get to the point where they’re saying ‘hi’ and ‘bye,’ which is what you want,” he told ENS in an interview. “You want them to know that you see them, that you respect them.”Lease said it is a “good investment to know the people who frequent our streets and may come into church,” yet in the end “our main thing isn’t to ask questions; it’s to feed them, and provide a safe place for everybody to eat.”St. James keeps the doors to its offices locked, Leas said. The 10 to 12 paid and volunteer staff members who are in the building “try not to open the door to people unless we know them,” he said, adding, “we’re pretty loose with that and trusting.”The parish hired a security guard nine years ago after “there were a couple run-ins with parishioners and some of the breakfast guests giving the parishioners a hard time” and “we know there was drug dealing and different things going on,” he said.The degree to which any or all of these steps are needed and fit a particular church’s situation depends in part, Michelfelder said, on “how secure [the ministers] feel in general, how empowered they feel” to manage their own situation. That includes knowing and deciding to accept the risks.“We know the church office is not a safe place,” she said. “We just know this. If you can’t live with that, you maybe shouldn’t work here.”Deb Weber, the secretary at Christ Church, Delavan, is a case in point. As a former police officer who works part time at the Episcopal church, part time at Delavan United Methodist Church and runs the emergency shelter, Watson said she doesn’t feel very scared really, “but there are times I do feel uncomfortable.”“If we let fear drive our ministry, we aren’t being very good about persevering against evil,” Karstetter said as Weber murmured agreement. “That fear is the evil that if we let get a foothold, we wouldn’t do any ministry.”The church, Weber said, has a mission among people who might be frightful. “So many of the people we come in contact with, this is the only love they’ve ever seen,” she said.That knowledge, and a good dose of empathy, help both Weber and Karstetter. “They work up the courage to come and ask for help, and then you treat them like they’re horrible, scary people? You can’t do that with everybody,” Karstetter said. “Even the people that sometimes you’re afraid of, we still need to respect their dignity even though they have substance-abuse problems and everything else. We still try to love them as Christ loved us.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (2) Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rachel Quinn says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ June 1, 2012 at 10:46 am Good article……………as a police officer it’s hard to balance loving all like Christ and being “sceptical”of some,even in church , we do the best we can………………and pray were doing the right thing…….again, good article……………….God bless our pastors and those working in the church………….. Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img May 23, 2012 at 6:35 pm Dale D. Regan, the head of Episcopal School in Jacksonville, Florida, was shot and killed March 6 by an ex-employee. That’s three workers shot and killed in less than two months. I wish the Standing Committee on Justice would draft some kind of resolution regarding gun violence at General Convention, or even go as far as supporting gun control. Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 18, 2012 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. Violence at churches is rare, but ministers remain vigilant Church workers know they are ‘on the front lines’ Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC michael Neal says: Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

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New Social Enterprise Growth Fund for Scotland

first_imgNew Social Enterprise Growth Fund for Scotland The Enterprise Growth Fund will provide grants of between £25,000 and £200,000 to support the long-term development of third sector social enterprises in Scotland. Grants can be spent on improving service delivery, responding to new opportunities, and on organisational capacity building. Grants will be given to enterprises with the greatest potential for growth and future sustainability. The future sustainability should be in the form of trading or other forms of income generation, with an enhanced ability to win contracts.As well as having robust business and development plans, successful applicants will need to be working with disadvantaged groups, providing services to disadvantaged communities or be providing environmental benefits.After the grant investment and support from the Just Enterprise scheme, grantees should also show improved efficiencies and greater social impact.Further information and how to apply.Applications to the Enterprise Growth Fund will not be accepted until late August 2011. By that time more detailed application ./guidance, eligibility criteria and other information will be available.The application process and decisions about grants will be complete by the end of January 2012 so that the money is available this financial year.If you have any questions about the Fund you should contact the Wise Group on 0141 303 3131 or e-mail [email protected] can be spent on improving service delivery, responding to new opportunities, and on organisational capacity building. As well as having robust business and development plans, successful applicants will need to be working with disadvantaged groups, providing services to disadvantaged communities or be providing environmental benefits.Applications to the Enterprise Growth Fund will not be accepted until late August 2011. If you have any questions about the Fund you should contact the Wise Group on 0141 303 3131 or e-mail [email protected] Tagged with: Funding Scotland social enterprise AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Howard Lake | 27 July 2011 | News  41 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1center_img Advertisement This piece is an abbreviated version of one of many funding opportunities first published this week at www.fundinginformation.org, the resource for up to date information about new grant making trusts, and new sources of grants, loans and donations for voluntary organisations, charities, social enterprises and the public sector throughout the UK. The Scottish Government is making £4 million available to support a new Enterprise Growth Fund. Grants of between £25,000 and £200,000 will be available to social enterprises and other third sector organisations throughout Scotland that have a great potential for growth and sustainability yet require support now to develop their services and infrastructure. The Fund is being managed by the Wise Group.The Fund is half of a new programme funded by the Scottish Government to help social enterprises grow and operate more effectively and efficiently. In 2011-12, £4 million will be available across Scotland to help enterprising third sector organisations carry through on ambitious and sustainable business plans. A further £3 million is being put into a Just Enterprise programme for the period 2011-14, which will support social entrepreneurs and third sector organisations across Scotland, part of which will be spent on an online information hub. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Cyber-dissident gets five-year prison sentence

first_img April 7, 2021 Find out more August 27, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Cyber-dissident gets five-year prison sentence Reporters Without Borders protested at a five-year jail sentence imposed on Vietnamese cyberdissident Pham Hong Son, who has already been in prison for more than a year and half. Dr Pham was first sentenced in June to 13 years in prison, allegedly for “spying.” Organisation News April 27, 2021 Find out more to go further VietnamAsia – Pacific RSF laureates support jailed Vietnamese journalist Pham Doan Trang RSF_en Receive email alerts News News Vietnam sentences journalist Tran Thi Tuyet Dieu to eight years in prison Follow the news on Vietnam News April 22, 2021 Find out more VietnamAsia – Pacific Three more independent reporters arrested in Vietnam Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières) protested today at a five-year jail sentence imposed on Vietnamese cyberdissident Pham Hong Son, who has already been in prison for more than a year and half.”Five years in jail for translating an article about democracy and posting it on the Internet is very heavy punishment,” it said, calling on the international community, especially the European Union (EU), to continue pressing for his release. Dr Pham, who works for a foreign pharmaceutical company, was sentenced in June to 13 years in prison and three years of house arrest, allegedly for “spying.” In an unusual move, the prison sentence was cut by eight years today by the Hanoi supreme people’s court on appeal, after the charges against him were reportedly changed to allow it.Reporters Without Borders said the reduction was a political decision and a sop to international criticism. Before the appeal, the organisation had called on the secretary-general of the Intergovernmental Agency of French-Speaking Countries, the French foreign minister and the European commission’s external relations commissioner to intervene and to ensure diplomats could attend the trial.The 26 August appeal, which lasted several hours, took place amid tight security. Journalists and a group of diplomats were not allowed in. Only the prisoner’s wife, Vu Thuy Ha, was permitted to attend.She said Pham left the dock in protest again the hearing being held in secret and that the judges had paid more attention to his lawyer’s argument, but added that her husband should have been declared innocent. he said she had been able to whisper to him in the courtroom that “we’re not alone. Many people are helping us.”Dr Pham has been held since March last year in a prison near the capital and his conditions of detention are not known. He was arrested on 25 March for translating and posting online an article from the local US embassy website called “What is democracy?” He has also written some articles himself which have appeared on Vietnamese online forums. He was held in secret for four months, during which neither his family nor his lawyer were allowed to see him.Five Vietnamese cyber-dissidents are in prison for their online activities. Two were sentenced last November and December to terms of four and 12 years in prison. A fifth is under house arrest. last_img read more

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Thursday’s QPR quiz

first_imgTest your knowledge by seeing how many of these five QPR-related questions you can answer correctly.[wp-simple-survey-74]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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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St. Bernards prepares for first season in Big 5

first_imgSt. Bernards is in its second week of preseason practice and head coach Matt Tomlin is busy at work molding his young team into regular season form. St. Bernards varsity football will open its 2018 season in unfamiliar territory as the newcomer to the Big 5 Conference. St. Bernards will contend with Eureka, Del Norte and Fortuna for the Big 5 crown come this fall.“Going up against bigger schools gives these guys all the motivation they need,” Tomlin said. “They are excited, and we’re going to …last_img read more

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SA property sector worth R4.9-trillion

first_img20 September 2012 The South African property sector is worth R4.9-trillion, according to research released by the Property Sector Charter Company in Johannesburg on Tuesday. It is the first study of its kind about the size and shape of the country’s property industry. “The research creates a hub of knowledge about the property sector, consolidating information and developing a common and consistent understanding,” chief executive officer of the Property Sector Charter Company, Portia Tau-Sekati, said in a statement. “By determining the size of the South African property sector, we are moving towards a proper baseline measure to assess market size and its components, the scale of different services and activities within the sector.” The sector contributes significantly to the country’s economy and in 2009 comprised 8.3% of gross domestic product (GDP), according to a South African Property Owners Association research report entitled “the economic impact of the property sector in South Africa”. According to the Charter Council’s study, only 1% of the country’s land is urban and residential, about 73% is natural pasture, approximately 12% is agricultural and the remaining land is comprised of conservations and reserves. It also indicates that about two-thirds of the property owned in South Africa is residential and worth R3-trillion, while commercial property is worth R780-billion. Undeveloped land that is zoned for development is valued at R520-billion and publicly owned property, including national, provincial and local government and state-owned enterprises, is worth R570-billion. “Retail property has the highest value of the commercial property sectors in South Africa at R340-billion, followed by office properties at R228-billion and industrial properties at R187-billion,” the Charter Council reported. “Representing a small comparative value of R25-billion is hospitality, leisure and ‘other’ property.” The study will be an annual one and the Charter Council aims for it to become the benchmark against which progress in the industry is measured. “The study is a useful tool for understanding the South African property market and its dynamics,” Tau- Sekati said. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Brand South Africa lauds women’s contribution to democracy

first_imgJohannesburg, Thursday 17 October 2013 – Brand South Africa celebrates the contribution women have made to South Africa’s democracy, and welcomes the formation of the ‘1000 Voices’ movement on Friday 18 October at Emperor’s Place in Ekurhuleni in Gauteng.The movement aims to open the channels of engagement between government, academics, private and public sectors, faith-based organisations and citizens from all walks of life to profile and eradicate gender based violence. It also intends to create a conversation around the meaning and impact of ‘freedom’ for South African women, 20 years into democracy.Brand South Africa’s Director of Strategic Marketing and Communication, Wendy Tlou, reflecting upon the role of women in driving a nation’s development said, “It is inspiring that more than 1000 participants – male and female – from all spheres of society will participate in this launch.  We hope that this launch will kick-start a movement, geared towards empowering women to play their part to implement the National Development Plan.    It is imperative that we recognise the value of gender, along with race and geographical location, when proposing a range of measures to advance women’s equality.”Brand South Africa’s Brand Manager Sithembile Ntombela will deliver an address under the theme: “Women 20 years into democracy” and will also participate in the event as a panellist.  Leo Makgamathe, Programme Manager: Civil Society will also represent Brand South Africa at the event.Panel discussions will take place under the following themes:Celebrating women empowerment and the role of Open Government Partnership;Playing Your Part in fighting abuse and stopping rape;The role of young people in stopping abuse‘1000 Voices’ is an initiative by the South African envoy to the Open Government Partnership, Public Service and Administration Deputy Minister Ayanda Dlodlo. At the event, Ms Dlodlo will also launch the Open Government Partnership SA plan.Other panellists on the day include: National Police Commissioner Riah Phiyega, Public Protector Thuli Madonsela, Political Economist Lebohang Pheko, activist and radio host Leila Benelli and Controlesa Chief Patekile Holomisa, amongst others.Note to EditorsAbout the Open Government PartnershipThe Open Government Partnership (OGP) is an international, voluntary effort to improve government performance, encourage civic participation and enhance government responsiveness to people by promoting more transparent, effective and accountable governments—with institutions that empower citizens and are responsive to their aspirations. Openness is the most powerful lever for achieving this. OGP aims to secure concrete commitments from governments to promote transparency, empower citizens, fight corruption, and harness new technologies to strengthen governance. To achieve these objectives, OGP brings together governments and civil society organisations.  Currently South Africa is a member of the OGP Steering Committee and also the OGP Learning and Peer Support sub-committee, which seeks to promote knowledge sharing on open governance matters. 57 countries are currently members of the OGP partnership.About Brand South AfricaBrand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness abroad. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship.Further resources from Brand South AfricaMedia are invited to visit http://www.southafrica.info/ for further resources which can be reproduced without any copyright infringement.  Kindly attribute to Brand South Africa.For more information or to set up interviews, please contact:Nadia Samie-JacobsPublic Relations DomesticTel: +27 11 712 5007Mobile: +27 (0)72 777 9399Email: [email protected]last_img read more

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AGCO introduces White Planters 9800VE Series Planters

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest AGCO Corporation, a worldwide manufacturer and distributor of agricultural equipment, recently unveiled the new White Planters 9800VE Series planter.The 9800VE Series planters are the result of AGCO’s latest investment in planting technology available from Precision Planting. The planters feature a new seed meter, electronic drive, automated downforce plus monitoring and data management technologies which take industry-leading White Planters to an unprecedented level of seed placement performance.“Researchers continue to learn and quantify the yield benefits of accurate seed placement. With that understanding, our customers are demanding technology that will allow them to capture the full yield potential of every seed planted,” says Conor Bergin, tactical marketing manager, Application, Seeding and Tillage. “The 9800VE Series planters are equipped to do just that, in addition to providing the long-lasting durability and simple maintenance and operation White Planters has provided for more than 40 years.”The 9800VE Series row-crop planters are available with a full range of options and attachments and may be configured to fit any production system. The Series offers three models with 30-inch row spacing in 12-row, 16-row and 24-row configurations: the 9812VE-30, the 9816VE-30 and 9824VE-30. The planters are built upon three-section frames that flex 21 degrees up or down at each wing for consistent planting depth across irregular terrain and that fold for convenient movement from field to field.vSet meterThe new planters are equipped with the proven and reliable vSet meter, which offers the industry’s most consistent seed singulation plus outstanding reliability for minimal downtime. This meter features a flat disk with a single vac setting and a floating, 5-lobed singulator that makes sure no two seeds of any kind can occupy the same hole. It handles virtually any seed size or shape with a minimal amount of tweaks to vac pressure, disk or singulator settings and delivers nearly 100 percent accuracy.DeltaForce hydraulic downforceDeltaForce hydraulic downforce control matches field conditions on-the-go to provide consistent seed depth placement for each individual row. The downforce of each row unit is adjusted automatically to minimize soil compaction or prevent shallow placement, for a seed environment that delivers uniform emergence leading to maximum yield. It compensates for soil variation caused by wheel tracks, changes in soil type, soil moisture and varying amounts of crop residue across the field.vDrive electronic driveThe vDrive electronic drive system on 9800VE Series planters allows row-by-row control of the vSet seed meters so they adjust independently around headland curves. This precise control ensures the desired population is planted, saving seed and ensuring equidistant plant spacing for optimum yields. In addition, the vDrive allows prescription planting that matches plant population to the soil’s yield potential as well as row shut off to prevent over planting of point rows and end rows. The vDrive is self-contained and virtually maintenance free compared to traditional mechanical systems with sprockets, drive chains and bearings.20/20 SeedSense monitorWhite Planter’s 9800 are equipped with the fully integrated SeedSense monitor which tracks population, speed, skips, doubles, row unit ride, down force and ground contact on the go. The information is immediately displayed on a color screen, allowing the operator to make adjustments needed to seed precisely, maintain depth, avoid compaction and troubleshoot mechanical problems.Optional FieldView data collection and mappingFieldView data collection and mapping is an iPad-based solution to real-time, high definition mapping and data collection. It integrates seamlessly with SeedSense and is available as a factory-installed option. With data captured through SeedSense, producers can see exactly what the planter is doing in real time and save the data to use for future decision making.Options and attachments fit individual needsAs with other planters in the Series, the White Planters 9800VE series planters may be equipped to fit the needs of nearly any production system. For full details about the new White Planters 9800VE Series, visit your nearest AGCO dealer or visit www.agcocorp.comlast_img read more

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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Episode 35 | Livestock robotics, Christmas trees, and veal

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ty Higgins, Bart Johnson, Joel Penhorwood, and Matt Reese come together to talk agriculture and the Ohio State win in episode 35 of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, brought to you by AgriGold.A number of topics in this weeks meeting, including Ty Higgins with Jeff Sizelove of Zoetis talking developments in agriculture, partly the further involvement of robotics down the road.Matt Reese hears from Al Divencenzo, president of the Ohio Christmas Tree Association.Joel Penhorwood talks upcoming veal housing requirements ready to go into effect January 1, 2018. He hears from Dr. Marissa Hake of the American Veal Association.All that and much more in this week’s edition of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast.last_img read more

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