Strength and Conditioning of Young Players: Part I – Technique

first_imgBRISTOL, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 03: Andy Short of England stretches during the England Under 20 Training session at Clifton College on February 3, 2011 in Bristol, England. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS When working with young rugby players it should be the aim of the coach to develop all round movement literacy. Young players will benefit from a strength and conditioning program that is not one dimensional with trends towards putting size on but instead improves all aspects of fitness including mobility, running mechanics, speed and agility, and proficient technique of barbell training exercises. These should be the foundations of the strength and conditioning program.The desired outcome should be the development of players with long term durability and trainability, and this will arm them with a strong basis from which they can continually progress and improve. In the weights room do not become obsessed with lifting numbers and size of the players – this should be discouraged, instead be obsessed with good technique as this will prove much more successful for the young player in the longer term. In rugby many of the body positions regarded as ‘strong’ and most effective are similar to the correct postures required in the weights room in the big exercises such as squats and deadlifts, so the emphasis on technique in the gym will have a positive effect on body positions on the paddock.Key exercises to develop techniques in:Back Squats and Front SquatsDeadliftsOlympic / Weightlifting exercises e.g. Power CleansThese exercises will provide a great foundation for the young rugby player. Once proficient in technique these exercises will pay dividends long term and prove invaluable in strength and power development that will have a positive transfer in rugby performance. Key technique considerations: Scapula – shoulder blade retractionBig chestNatural curvature of the spine at all times – ensure the lower back is not flexedPower and strength in the movements comes from the legsMark WilliamsMark Williams is Head of Rugby and Strength and Conditioning at Seevic College, Essex. Mark has his CSCS accreditation as well as being a UKSCA accredited strength and conditioning coach. Mark is currently studying for his MSc in strength and conditioning at St. Mary’s College, West London. Mark is also current captain for National League 2 South, Southend RFC where he plays loose head prop.last_img read more

Read more

RIP: The Rev. Keith Johnson, rector of St. Philip’s, Harlem

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing March 18, 2015 at 12:05 am THANKS FOR YOUR SERVICE, REVEREND ! March 18, 2015 at 7:18 pm We dedicated our March 8 10:00 service to Fr. Keith here at St. Andrew’s, Ben Lomond, where I am his successor. There were many here, from our congregation and the wider community, who had stories to tell about Fr. Keith’s impact on their lives. I was grateful for his taking the initiative to phone me and talk about the congregation here, and to give me a chance to get to know him a little bit, after I was installed. Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events March 17, 2015 at 8:33 pm I give thanks for his life of dedication to ministry and family and pray that he is walking in the wondrous glory of God’s love. Amen In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Mark P. Fisher says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Rev. Keith Johnson[St. Philips Church] The Rev. Keith Johnson, 53, passed away Tuesday, February 24, 2015 due to complications from cancer.Born in New Orleans in 1961, Keith grew up schooled in the particular values of his parents, Minnie and Robert Johnson.These virtues, including southern warmth, kindheartedness and a gracious respect of others, would shine in his ministry as a priest. He loved the novel To Kill a Mockingbird and would often listen to the soundtrack of the film when praying or writing. Atticus Finch’s innate goodness reminded Keith of his own father, as well as inspiring Keith to become his own man.Keith attended the University of Illinois, Champaign Urbana. He graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science. Following graduation, Keith went to help others by taking a position with the U.S. Social Security Administration in Detroit and then Key West, Florida.In 1998, Keith married Ginny Hare, and took on an instant family which included Ginny’s two children, Edward and Sarah. The family moved to Alexandria, Virginia, where Keith studied at The Virginia Theological Seminary. One of Keith’s joys was coaching Edward and his various teams in football. He coached Pop Warner football during his time in seminary, and continued coaching freshman and junior varsity ball.In 2001, he was ordained a deacon in the Episcopal Church by Bishop Leopold Frade. Later that year, he accepted a priesthood in the Diocese of Southeast Florida. Keith simultaneously served the church as rector of St. Matthew’s and assistant at St Paul’s in Delray Beach. Keith’s personal mission here was to bridge the racial gap between these two diverse parishes.From 2003 to 2008, Keith served as rector of St. Andrew’s in Ben Lomond, California. While here Keith served on the board of Valley Churches United Missions, a non-profit that provided food and assistance to over 7000 county residents. Keith next went on to minister as an assistant priest at Holy Trinity in Clearwater, Florida, for a few years. He then spent eighteen months at St. Luke’s in New Orleans before being called to Harlem’s historic St. Philip’s Church in 2012.During his time at St. Philip’s, Keith quickly emerged as a significant leader among the clergy and brought leadership to the revitalization of the Episcopal presence in Harlem. He embraced this calling at once, providing a reasonable, loving and gracious presence in that community.On Thursday mornings, Keith provided a ministry of presence to parolees at the Harlem Community Justice Center. As clergy for St Philip’s important inter-faith initiative, Keith supported these men and women with training in public speaking skills so they could tell their stories. Keith also established “Warriors of a Dream,” a neighborhood anti-violence youth initiative, as well as a local chapter of Integrity LGBT at St Philip’s. Keith lent his smile and presence as he rode on the Episcopal float in the annual Greenwich Village Gay Pride Parade. During Keith’s tenure, St Philip’s became a member of Ecclesia, a ministry providing Eucharist and meals to the homeless in Marcus Garvey Park on Sundays.Keith was one of six fellows in the Faith and Justice Fellowship program under the Federation of Protestant Welfare and Agencies and New York Theological Seminary. This program trains faith leaders to develop their abilities to become prophetic witnesses for fair social policies and equal justice.He is survived by his wife, Ginny, his step-children, Edward and Sarah, his parents and sister. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Fr. Blaine R. Hammond says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Rev. Harriet B. Linville says: Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA March 19, 2015 at 9:59 am With gratefulness for Keith’s life and ministry, we say good-bye for a while. It was a pleasure to serve with Keith in El Camino Real. Blessings to his family and parish. Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Posted Mar 17, 2015 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group RIP: The Rev. Keith Johnson, rector of St. Philip’s, Harlem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME John Barton says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (4) Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest People Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more

Read more

Broward Deputy Responding to I-95 Crash Hits Off-Duty Deputy, Driver

first_imgA crash on I-95 in Deerfield Beach Friday night appears to have caused another accident, ultimately involving two deputies.According to a report, a Broward Sheriff’s deputy responding to a crash involving a Toyota Corolla on the highway hit an off-duty Sheriff’s Office deputy who had stopped to help the Toyota’s driver.Veda Coleman-Wright, public information officer for the Sheriff’s Office, says the Toyota’s driver and the off-duty deputy were standing on the shoulder next to the guardrail. That is when the responding deputy lost control, side-swiped another Sheriff’s Office vehicle, and then hit the pair standing on the side of the highway.Coleman-Wright adds that the roadway was wet at the time of the crash.The names of the deputies and the driver involved in the incident have not been disclosed.The deputy has been treated and released. However, Coleman-Wright is unsure whether the driver of the Toyota has also been released from the hospital, but says the injuries are not life-threatening.The Florida Highway Patrol is investigating the crash, while the Broward Sheriff’s Office investigates the part involving the deputy.last_img read more

Read more

Half-time: Swansea 0 Chelsea 0

first_imgFernando Torres went close to giving Chelsea a half-time lead at the Liberty Stadium.The Spaniard had a header cleared off the line by Leon Britton and also headed straight into the arms of keeper Gerhard Tremmel following Victor Moses’ cross.Referee Kevin Friend then waved away the visitors’ appeals for a penalty after Eden Hazard was bundled over in the area by Swansea defender Ashley Williams.Chelsea are without the injured Juan Mata and David Luiz, but Ashley Cole recovered from an ankle problem in time to play and Branislav Ivanovic is back from suspension.The Blues are attempting to regain top spot in the Premier League, which Manchester United took by beating Arsenal earlier this afternoon.Chelsea: Cech, Azpilicueta, Cahill, Ivanovic, Cole, Romeu, Mikel, Moses, Oscar, Hazard, Torres. Subs: Turnbull, Ramires, Ferreira, Marin, Sturridge, Bertrand, Piazon.Click here for the Swansea v Chelsea 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Read more

Local Roundup: Jeffrey Kersten dazzles as Humboldt Crabs record 2-1 win over California Expos

first_imgArcata >> Starting pitcher Jeffrey Kersten put in the strongest start of the young 2017 season, striking out 10 in eight impressive innings as the Humboldt Crabs recorded a 2-1 comeback win over the California Expos at the Arcata Ball Park on Saturday night.Humboldt (5-1 overall) scored a pair of runs in the bottom of the seventh to complete the comeback.Crabs first baseman Ryan Myers tied the game with an RBI double to score center fielder Jeremiah Burks. Moments later, Myers scored on a …last_img read more

Read more

Richard Sherman says he’ll apologize to Baker Mayfield for handshake drama

first_imgSANTA CLARA — Upon further review, it turns out Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield didn’t refuse to shake hands with Richard Sherman and other 49ers before Monday night’s game.Sherman, who accused Mayfield of disrespecting the 49ers by not properly greeting them on the field for the coin toss, admitted he was wrong and intends to apologize to Mayfield.Shortly after Sherman’s postgame claim about the missing handshake from Mayfield, there was video evidence to contradict the 49ers …last_img read more

Read more

Raiders mailbag: Time for D-coordinator Paul Guenther to go?

first_imgALAMEDA — Got a little behind on the mailbag with the unfortunate Willie Brown news. So let’s get to your questions.Q: What do you think of (Paul) Guenther? What grade would you give him? — @urbanteaaaSince the Raiders are 3-3, a straight ‘C.’ He’s got better players this season — I was on record as saying he deserved a mulligan in 2018 considering the personnel. The personnel is better, but still not up to par. He’s going to have to live with Clelin Ferrell’s growing pains since he’s a No. …last_img read more

Read more

SA debut for LSE’s TradElect

first_img30 March 2007The London Stock Exchange’s new TradElect trading system, the final phase of a four-year technology overhaul, is set go live for the first time in South Africa after the exchange extended its IT contract with the JSE Limited for a further five years.The extended contract will see the LSE’s next-generation trading system going live on the Johannesburg and Namibia markets on 2 April ahead of its introduction on the London market in the second quarter of the year.The LSE and JSE have also agreed to develop their technology and business cooperation further “to encourage growth in listings, trading and data sales,” the LSE said in a statement last week.“Over the last five years, the JSE has developed a strong relationship with the London Stock Exchange, and we are excited to be the first exchange to use their new technology,” JSE chief operating officer Leanne Parsons said at a formal contract signing ceremony in London.“As part of the JSE’s broader effort to strengthen its role as a competitive force in the global financial marketplace, the JSE is pleased to be able to implement the LSE’s new superior trading platform.”LSE chief executive Clara Furse said the exchange looked forward “to extending the scope of our partnership to the benefit of both of our markets and companies.“As the leading exchange in Africa, the JSE will, through the adoption of TradElect, be operating on world-leading technology, combining very low levels of latency with high levels of scalability and systems reliability.”Since May 2002, the LSE has supplied the JSE with its trading system, JSE SETS, on an application service provider basis. JSE market participants access the trading system via a dedicated communications link between Johannesburg and London.Since the migration of the JSE’s trading to SETS, the average daily number of trades on the JSE has increased by over 140%, from 15 000 in May 2002 to 37 000 in February 2007, operating with 100% availability.According to the LSE, TradElect’s introduction is the final and most significant phase of the exchange’s four-year transition to next-generation trading technology, representing “the biggest development to the LSE’s trading infrastructure since the implementation of the Sequence Programme and SETS between 1994 and 1997.”SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Read more

Is Africa misbranded?

first_img21 August 2007Nation brands are difficult to get right. When it comes to Africa, the branding of the continent is particularly one-sided. It is easy to mistake one of the world’s most disparate and compelling continents as an impoverished, war-riddled charity case that is best to avoid.Despite the fact that some African countries are excelling in growth and stability – Botswana, for example, was one of the world’s fastest growing economies over the last decade – the continent’s reputation continues to overpower the identities of its nations.Perhaps this is because the noisiest branding of Africa still comes from outside the continent.The failure of ‘charity branding’Africa’s dominant image has been created by the charity brands: the 1985 Live Aid to provide food for Ethiopia, 2005’s Live 8, “Make Poverty History,” G8 politics, Sir Bono and Sir Bob, celebrity adoptions, and Vanity Fair covers. This article was first published by brandchannel.com. Republished here with kind permission from the author.Such campaigns can play a positive role – a strong public voice can put ground swells of pressure on politicians and instigate change. But, en masse, these campaigns have a tendency to create a perception of Africa as a continent that is beyond hope: too much poverty, too much death, and an overwhelming sense of too many problems with too few coherent solutions.For all the good intentions of the campaigners, the tragic reality is that even the charity branding is not working.Despite the awareness and the pleas – and the impression that much is being done for “Africa” – overall international aid to Africa has consistently fallen during the last decade; most of the G8 promises to help Africa have not been met; unfair international trade rules remain a key issue; and external funding for manageable diseases like HIV/Aids and malaria is simply not enough. The newspaper columns, the concerts, and the international declarations remain in the realms of rhetoric.All in the same ‘basket case’While it is impossible to deny that within Africa lies critical, complex, and extraordinarily challenging issues, it must also be acknowledged that she is a continent of 54 countries and one of vast contrasts.Zimbabwe still attracts tourists to the stable enclave of Victoria Falls while the rest of the country collapses; its neighbour, South Africa, is experiencing high levels of economic growth, tourism, and foreign investment, while shouldering a reputation for violent crime; Mozambique has become a hot-spot for backpackers and other tourists after decades of civil war; Morocco in the north has successfully become a “European” travel destination, almost distinct from the rest of Africa.Yet any “good” stories of growth, strong leadership, and achievements are too often overshadowed by persistent news of the bad.“Africa is suffering from the ‘continent branding effect’ where every country shoulders the reputation of the others,” says government advisor Simon Anholt.“One of the greatest obstacles to Africa’s economic development is the well-meaning attempt from people in the West branding Africa as a ‘basket case.’ But a charity brand is fundamentally different from a growth brand. So Africa is simultaneously trying to present two incompatible ideas: a desirable destination and a charity case.”A re-brand for African countries?The tables, however, are beginning to turn. Attempts are being made by individual African countries to create identities that stand out from the dominant Africa continent brand.Much of these branding exercises are aimed at the business and tourism sectors. Ethiopia “re-branded” to lose its previous famine-ridden image in favour of foreign investment and tourism. Namibia clearly recognized that celebrity endorsement can boost a country brand by allowing “Brad and Angelina” (plus baby) to their shores. Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo are actively courting international business to attract investment in their post-conflict states.Countries like Kenya, Zambia, Tanzania, and Botswana have successfully positioned their wares to appeal to the high-end traveller. Even Nigeria has attempted a repositioning by launching its “Heart of Africa” campaign to a London audience “to promote Nigeria’s national brand assets.” Its message seeks to convince the UK’s business minds that there is more to Nigeria than oil and conflict.But there is the danger of branding for branding’s sake or mistaking a tourism campaign, website, or advertising as a country “re-brand”.“The first principle of brand development is to do it for a good measurable reason,” says Douglass de Villiers, CEO at Interbrand Sampson Africa. “It’s amazing the amount of money and effort that is wasted on country branding ‘because everyone’s doing it’.“The second principle of brand development is that branding is not advertising. Our TVs and press are inundated with ‘country adverts’ – the ads are becoming generic and seem unsupported by other brand development activities.“In essence,” argues De Villiers, “when embarking on the development of a country brand, the reasoning and activities should be based on a solid country business plan – growing GDP and sustaining GDP is usually a perfect place to start.”South Africa’s experienceSouth Africa has long invested in its own brand, both inside the country and internationally. Much can be learned from South Africa’s experiences of shifting perceptions (and realities) in the transition from an apartheid state, which was eventually boycotted by the international community, to a democratic country in 1994. In hindsight, significant progress has been made over the last decade.“The success of creating and consolidating the South African brand has been its comprehensive and people-centric approach to country branding,” says John Battersby, UK country manager for South Africa’s International Marketing Council. “It rolls together both the tangibles and intangibles and highlights the touch-and-feel components of branding.“The diversity, warmth, and generosity of the people – the ‘ubuntu’ – is what visitors really take away from South Africa,” says Battersby. “And that is why the music, the sounds, and the rhythm of the nation are as important as the wildlife, mountains, and beautiful beaches. So the brand that emerges is as tangible as Coca-Cola or Nike and it is the sum of all its parts – tourism, economic potential, and human diversity and togetherness.”South Africa may be on the right track – and is well aware that there are more issues to iron out before the country hosts soccer’s World Cup in 2010 – but many other nations still lag behind.“The good news is that African governments are thinking about this a lot,” says Anholt. “But they are reaching the wrong conclusions. Expensive advertising and PR campaigns, logos, and slogans are a wicked waste of taxpayers’ and donors’ money. A reputation cannot be constructed; it has to be earned.”The African RenaissanceWhile Africa’s nations search for their voice with “brand Africa,” the regional context must not be overlooked. It is important that an African national brand is clear on its position as part of the African continent, while offering something distinct from her neighbours – the nation is the sub-brand within the larger continent brand.South Africa’s approach has included this factor. “There needs to be a balance between South Africa as part of Africa and South Africa itself; the South Africa brand does not exist in a vacuum,” says Battersby. “Our approach capitalizes on the specific strengths of South Africa: it is both a gateway and a catalyst to speed the revival of Africa.”Indeed, South Africa has often positioned herself, and been perceived, as a lead player in Africa.President Thabo Mbeki famously proposed an “African Renaissance” in a speech in 1998 – it was a rallying cry for African countries to unite and throw off any remaining colonial hangovers: “[O]ut of Africa reborn must come modern products of human economic activity, significant contribution to the world of knowledge, in the arts, science and technology, new images of an Africa of peace and prosperity.” It could also be interpreted as a call for a regional repositioning of Africa on the international stage.Perhaps the most important aspect of “brand Africa,” and one that seems to be absent from the international charity-focused brand, is the involvement of African people.As de Villiers says: “The countries’ branding activities will need to focus on a multitude of audiences, all with different interests and drivers. But importantly – very importantly – the country also needs to focus on its people as their backbone to the brand’s development. If the country’s own people don’t buy the brand, then the intended audience won’t – at least not for long!”The future Africa?An effort to “brand” Africa, and her countries, does not mean glossing over the troubling issues to promote only the good. But it is a tactic of balancing perceptions. As an African trade representative commented: “creating a brand for a country is about striking a balance – you need to intensify the positive image that people know about you, and balance this with addressing the challenges that you experience as a country.”Africa could benefit from a shift in her current identity: by a brand that is managed from within, with a vision that is not overshadowed by charity and donor messages, or by a one-sided media image.Emerging country brands must also be realistic and authentic. A website or tourism campaign may be a component of a brand campaign, but it will have little impact without a broader brand development structure and vision.“We currently rely on the stereotype of the celebrity driven, paternalistic helping hand that belies the true power of the African people and their cultural landscape,” says Iain Ellwood, head of strategy at Interbrand UK. “We are still waiting for the authentic branding of African nations.”Perhaps only then will the dominant image of a “no hope” Africa be a brand of the past.Melissa Davis runs Truebranding, an agency in London that specialises in brand and responsibility. She is also the author of “More than a Name: An introduction to branding” (AVA Books, 2005). This article was first published by brandchannel.com. Republished here with kind permission from the author.last_img read more

Read more

When I joined as the block development and panchay

first_imgWhen I joined as the block development and panchayat officer in Haryana in 1989, my first assignment was to visit villages in Kaithal. During my trip, I wanted to use the washroom and asked for one at the sarpanch’s house. His wife replied that they go out in the fields. The shock coerced me to get involved in the sanitation campaign. As the district magistrate of Kurukshetra in 2008, I campaigned for behavioural change among people and told them why they need to stop defecating in the open. We incentivised constructing and using toilets and finally were successful in making 300 villages in the district open defecation free (ODF). Also Read – Hijacking Bapu’s legacyWhen I returned to Kurukshetra in 2013 after one round of posting, except for 67 ODF villages, all had slipped. People had stopped using the toilets. We realised that this is not a one-time exercise. Changing a habit requires time, effort and constant motivation. People need to know that the authorities, be it the sarpanch or the district administration, are with them, backing them and watching them. The programme has to be demand-driven. Till people do not ask for toilets, better sanitation and hygiene, it cannot be a success. People have to become responsible by forming self-help groups or small teams, which continuously motivate people to use toilets. This is the only way to sustain our open defecation free status. Also Read – The future is here!Rural areas are performing well in this, but there are problems in urban areas. In some places, 20 people live in a small house and use one community toilet. Mobile or community toilets for a large population are a failure. A toilet can be maintained well when few people use it. If not for every household, toilets must be built for every two to three houses. Keys should be provided to people so that the toilets are not treated as community toilets. In rural areas, the environment is just right to boycott anyone who defecates in the open. ODF can become sustainable if everybody becomes sensitive to the problem. The fight is much bigger than ODF. We have moved to ODF Plus. Our task is cut out. The fight is long. To sustain the achievement, we need constant efforts, not interference. (The author is the district collector of Panipat. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

Read more