Norway wealth fund develops software program to analyze climate investment risk

first_imgNorway wealth fund develops software program to analyze climate investment risk FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:Norway’s $975 billion wealth fund, the world’s largest, wants to know how much of a company’s carbon dioxide emission costs can be passed on to customers. The fund holds 1.4 percent of all globally listed shares, representing 9,000 companies, so a lot is at stake for the fund as it considers how to allocate investments amid rising climate-related costs.Norges Bank Investment Management is turning to data analytics, building a software tool that can help guide the process. Called Angle, the software can now take non-financial data, such as carbon dioxide emissions, combine it with trading data and earnings data of a given company, and see how it will affect its earnings in the years ahead. The next step, which has not been disclosed before, is to develop the platform to see how much of the carbon cost can be passed on to customers and how much companies must pay themselves.“For us, it is reasonably obvious that the focus on climate change risk will not go away and that is there as a risk for the companies (we invest in), whether directly or indirectly,” fund CEO Yngve Slyngstad said in an interview. “Therefore, there is an issue about the pricing of different companies,” he told Reuters, adding that the latest development of the software was not yet completed. “There is more work to be done on it,” he said.The work began when the fund was mandated by the Norwegian Parliament to divest from companies that derive 30 percent of more of its business or activities from thermal coal in 2015.Other institutional investors are also pushing companies to disclose the data they need to assess the climate-change risk to their investments. “The Norwegian sovereign wealth fund is one of the leading institutional investors when it comes to the analysis of climate risk,” Stephanie Pfeifer, chief executive of the institutional investors group on climate change, a group of 163 pension funds and asset managers representing over 21 trillion euros ($23.8 trillion) in assets.More: Norway wealth fund builds tool to analyse climate risk to portfoliolast_img read more

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Planned petrochemical project in Ohio may be on the ropes with departure of South Korean partner

first_imgPlanned petrochemical project in Ohio may be on the ropes with departure of South Korean partner FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Associated Press:The prospects for construction of a multibillion-dollar petrochemical plant in Ohio appear to have dimmed after a U.S. subsidiary of a South Korean company announced it was withdrawing as a partner in the project.A joint statement issued early Tuesday by Daelim Chemical USA and the U.S. subsidiary of Thailand’s PTT Global Chemical cited the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and oil price volatility for yet another delay in deciding whether the plant along the Ohio River would be built.PTT Global Chemical America President and CEO Toasaporn Boonyapipat in a separate statement said the project remains a “top priority” as the company searches for a new equity partner and works toward “a final investment decision.”The plant would convert — crack — molecules of ethane, a byproduct of natural gas drilling, into raw materials used to manufacture plastic and other products.PTTGCA announced its partnership with Daelim in March 2018. A PTTGCA spokesman said Tuesday that the company has thus far spent around $200 million on engineering and planning.JobsOhio, the state’s private nonprofit economic development arm, has contributed just over $70 million, including a $20 million grant in February to be paid directly to Bechtel Corp. to complete site engineering and site preparation at the site in Belmont County.[Mark Gillispie]More: South Korean firm quits petrochemical plant effort in Ohiolast_img read more

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Best Rivers in the Southeast Poll

first_imgClass V[poll id=”40″] Class IV[poll id=”39″] Class II[poll id=”37″] Class III[poll id=”38″] The Southeast and mid-Atlantic is teeming with navigable waterways. Everywhere you turn there is another blue line snaking through the landscape, providing the region with some of the best whitewater and flat water paddling in the country, if not the world. We truly live in a paddling paradise.In our June paddling issue we picked our favorite rivers in the Southeast and broke them down by difficulty in our Head of the Class: 50 of the Best Rivers in the Southeast feature. We are proud of our selections but would love to know what you think.Is your home water the best place to paddle? Does one river hold a special place in your heart?Vote for your favorite river below. If your river didn’t make the list, leave a comment and let us know why you think it should be the top dog.Best Rivers in the SoutheastClass I[poll id=”36″]last_img read more

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Clips of the Week: Brookies, SM100, Yeager Bomber, Brilliant Moment

first_imgOur favorite web videos from the week that was:1. Mountain BrookiesHere is a video of good BRO friend and fishing guide Matt Miles getting into some brook trout high in the Virginia Mountains. Make no mistake, that first fish is a slab of a Virginia brookie.Fly Fishing Virginia’s Mountain Streams from Matt Miles Fly Fishing on Vimeo.2. Shenandoah Mountain 100This is a very cool video recap of the Shenandoah Mountain 100 mile mountain bike race. These guys (and gals) are pretty nuts.2013 Shenandoah Mountain 100 from Adventure Seen on Vimeo.BONUS BIKE FOOTAGE from Stage 1 of the 2013 Pisgah Mountain Bike Stage Race3. Yeager BomberThe team at Snowshoe Mountain Resort is entering this weekend’s Red Bull Flugtag competition with their entry – and ode to WV native son, pioneering test pilot, and all around badass Chuck Yeager – the Yeager Bomber. Check out the video to see how the Bomber came together.4. The Brilliant MomentThis is a video put together by outdoor gear company Mountain Hardwear, and is in a similar vein as Backcountry.com’s viral “This is Backcountry” video. Get stoked for this weekend, this winter, this life.The Brilliant Moment from Mountain Hardwear on Vimeo.5. Thrashing PipelineWe are a little VA heavy in this week’s Clips, but I have got to add this vid anyway. Check out Cooper Sallade (in glasses no less) and Isaac Hull (12? 15?) thrashing Pipeline in the Richmond region of the James River.State of the James: ‘Pipeline’ from Hunter on Vimeo.Got a clip you want featured? Leave a comment or shoot and email to [email protected]!last_img read more

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Fridays on the Fly: Fly Tying 101

first_imgBodkinThe bodkin is basically a needle with a small metal handle attached. It will come in handy a the end of your tie when you need to free the eye of your hook from residual glue or head cement.imageHackle Pliers Good for grasping material too small to get ahold of with your fingers, hackle pliers will be needed more often than not.screen-shot-2017-01-06-at-12-38-11-pmTweezersThe need for tweezers is pretty self-explanatory. When you’re dealing with tiny parts that require extreme precision for proper assembly, a good pair of tweezers is a must.screen-shot-2017-01-06-at-12-41-09-pmHead CementHead cement is used throughout the fly tying process to secure your material to your hook. You’ll want to have a bottle before you give it a go. Trout can be hard to come by when winter weather sets in and the water temperatures dip at your favorite local fishery. In the face of this dilemma, many anglers turn to the art of fly tying to keep their passion alive and their knowledge sharply honed. From an outsider’s perspective, fly tying can look like an archaic and complicated endeavor, but these simple tips will help guide you through the nuance and have you filling up your boxes with homespun creations in no time.1.Get a ViseA vise is an obvious essential for the fly tying novice, and the market is flooded with them. When just starting out, buy one on the cheaper end of the spectrum. There will be plenty of time to upgrade if you really get into it. This starter vise from Cabella’s is great for beginners.screen-shot-2017-01-06-at-2-21-43-pm2. Make sure you have one of each of these tying tools.All of these tools are essential to make your dream of bypassing the fly shop, and the price tags associated with it, a reality. Make a list and head to the shop for these items before you dive in.BobbinA bobbin holds your fly-tying thread in place as you’re creating the fly. This model from Loon is top of the line.loon-ergonomic-bobbin-3Sharp ScissorsDon’t start tying flies without a dedicated pair of small but sharp tying scissors.yhst-17105658520519_2272_1093224539Whip FinishThis is the tool you’ll need to put the finishing touches on your fly. It allows you to tie a strong knot capable of holding the finished product in place. Reference tip number three to learn the ins and outs of using a whip finish.tmc513006-midge-finisher loon_water_based_head_cement_632223. Utilize Fly Tying Tutorials on Youtube.The internet is full of great fly tying resources. While most of them tend to be a little dry (beer helps with that), watching the right videos at the right time can put you on the path to becoming a proficient fly tier in no time. The videos embedded below make great starting points.This entire series is great for those just getting started, but start with lesson one if you’re getting in at the ground level. 4. Pick a bug that you use frequently and master it.For me it was a girlde bug or stone fly nymph. For you it may be a zebra midge, a san juan worm or a wooly bugger. Pick your favorite pattern and use that as a way to break into the fly tying game.5. Take some time to understand these three basic techniques.Use this video to understand three essential techniques used in the fly tying process: the jam knot, the pinch knot, and the whip finish. You’ll need to be able to execute each before you start producing your own fishable flies.6. Read up.You can probably find everything you need to know about basic fly tying on the internet, but valuable nuggets of hard-earned knowledge are always hiding between the covers of fly tying books. Start with this age-old standard.61pozw0izl-_sx376_bo1204203200_last_img read more

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Blue Ridge Parkway Announces Additional Modifications to Operations

first_img*ALL listed closures are to vehicular traffic only.* (NC/VA) – National Park Service officials announced today additional modifications to operations on the Blue Ridge Parkway in a continuing effort to support federal, state, and local efforts to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). Effective immediately, and in addition to all existing restrooms, visitor center, campground, and picnic area closures, the Blue Ridge Parkway is implementing closures at the following locations until further notice. BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY ROAD and AREA CLOSURES effective 4.15.2020Information is organized from North to South using Parkway Mileposts and nearby locations Photo of Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina from Getty Images Milepost &Nearby Landmarks or Common Place Names MP 294.5 – 296.4Road closed, including Price Park Picnic Area The NPS encourages people to take advantage of the many digital tools available to explore the National Park Service and learn more about the Blue Ridge Parkway during this time, including:Learn about the lives of the people who played key roles in the creation of this scenic roadway.Explore stories of how the Parkway was designed and constructed.Discover the diversity of plants and animals that make their home along the Parkway.Ask a park ranger a question about the park by submitting an email to blri_info @nps.gov or on the park’s social media platforms under the handle @blueridenps on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.Find Your “Virtual” Park information and activities for park sites across the country. MP 334 – 342Road closed, including Crabtree Falls Area, near Little Switzerland, NC Public notifications will be made when operations resume; updates will also be posted on the Parkway’s website, nps.gov/blri, and social media channels. MP 393 – 469Road closed from French Broad River Overlook to Southern Terminus of Parkway MP 316.4Linville Falls Spur Road closed, including parking at Linville Falls trailheads MP 85.9Peaks of Otter Visitor Center and Sharp Top Parking Areas closed MP 305 – 308Road closed NORTH CAROLINA MP 384.7Roadside parking closed at MST Trailheads at US 74A Parkway access ramps www.nps.gov/blri MP 292 – 294.5Road closed near Blowing Rock, including Moses Cone Parking Area and Hwy 221 Bass Lake Parking Lot. MP 377.4Parking areas closed at Craven Gap (Town Mountain Rd) for MST Trail access VIRGINIAMP 0 – 13Road closed, including Humpback Rocks (previously announced) MP 298.6 – 305Road closed through Grandfather Mountain area, including Rough Ridge and Linn Cove Viaduct MP 92.5Sharp Top Parking Widening closed at Appalachian Trail crossing The health and safety of park visitors, employees, volunteers, and partners remains the Parkway’s number one priority. Some sections of the Blue Ridge Parkway motor road and outdoor spaces, including trails, remain accessible to the public in accordance with the latest federal, state, and local health guidance. If contemplating a visit to a national park during this pandemic, the NPS asks visitors to adhere to guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local public health authorities to protect visitors and employees. As services are limited, the NPS urges visitors to continue to practice Leave No Trace principles, including pack-in and pack-out, to keep outdoor spaces safer and healthier. MP 355 – 375.6Road closed from Mt. Mitchell to Ox Creek, including Craggy Gardenslast_img read more

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From Coca Growers To Rural Tourism Promoters In Colombia

first_imgBy Dialogo October 26, 2009 After years spent growing coca leaf, the raw material of cocaine, a hundred families have become promoters of rural tourism along the Colombian Caribbean. Celso Lopez, 53, is one of those benefiting from this new source of income, but he shows no shame in admitting that in the past he was deeply into illicit coca growing. He, like dozens of families, is part of a promising project to substitute livelihoods from illegal crops on the edge of the Tayrona Natural Park on the Caribbean by instead taking advantage of the great touristic potential of its spectacular scenery. A few years ago, after a government eradication campaign against illicit crops, these families welcomed a plan to change their way of life. They began to promote rural tourism by joining a government program called Forest Ranger Families for Social Action. This Colombian organization offers assistance to millions of displaced persons and to those hurt by the armed conflict that has devastated the country for more than four decades, as well as to those left homeless by natural disasters. With a sincere smile, businessman Lopez told Efe how after years of economic ups and downs, in a period of crisis he “interspersed” among his coffee plantations 2 hectares (nearly 5 acres) of coca. “Today I can say that I contribute more to peace in Colombia and to the tranquillity of my family” by managing country cabins for tourists in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta mountains, Lopez said. The 118 Forest Ranger Families began eradicating their own coca plantations, and since then have cared for the environment while saving half of the funds the government pays them in order to buy a piece of land. In that way the former coca growers acquired the San Rafael farm covering 354 hectares (874 acres), on which they built ecotouristic inns. These are cabins in the jungle near plantations of coffee, plantain, cacao and fruit trees. They have also installed ponds for fish farming. “We’re in the buffer zone for the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta to protect the water and oxygen for future generations,” Lopez said, adding that his new job lets him live “happier and more peacefully,” even though he only earns enough to survive. The Forest Ranger Families project has helped create a “new social fabric” and a “changed life” for hundreds of people, said Lopez, who alternates his main activity with that of a tourist guide. The Colombian’s five cabins are nestled amid lush natural scenery, with a crystal-clear river running along stone paths and routes that lead to dream-like prospects, to tropical rain forests, to birdwatching, all just a short distance from the Caribbean Sea. Others among these one-time coca families, also hurt in the past by the conflict and forced displacement, are now dedicated beekeepers. One of them is Oscar Naranjo, owner of 20 beehives on a family farm near the town of Bonda, close to Santa Marta and the Sierra Nevada. Naranjo sometimes prays that it doesn’t rain too much, but also that the summer doesn’t last too long. “Any extreme leaves the trees without flowers, and without flowers there’s no honey,” the beekeeper, who supports his family to a great extent on what the bees produce, told Efe. He, like Lopez, talks of the “happiness and tranquillity” that his work on the farm gives him, now that all his activities are legal.last_img read more

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Demand Dwindles for U.S. Forces in Haiti, Official Says

first_imgBy Dialogo February 22, 2010 The need for U.S military forces in Haiti is dwindling as Haitian authorities and nongovernmental organizations begin to accept a greater share of relief efforts in the ravaged country, an American military official said. About 13,000 U.S. troops are involved in the earthquake-relief effort — with 7,000 forces on the ground — down from a peak overall level of about 20,000 at the start of this month, Army Lt. Gen. P.K. “Ken” Keen, the top U.S. commander in Haiti, told Pentagon reporters today. “As we see this transition occurring, we see our civilian partners increase their capabilities — both the government here in Haiti as well as the nongovernment organizations — and we see the need for our military assistance dwindling,” Keen said via video teleconference from the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince. The update on Haiti’s recovery comes about a month after a magnitude 7 earthquake struck the Caribbean nation, creating what an official called one of the greatest humanitarian emergencies in the history of the Americas. U.S. aid began pouring into affected areas in the immediate aftermath, but a greater share of relief efforts has been transferred to partners as conditions progress. The American commander declined to describe a timeline or expected scope of the U.S. military presence in Haiti, saying conditions in the country would determine the response. “As we look at our military requirements in supporting [the U.S. Agency for International Development] and the government of Haiti,” Keen said, “we’re dialing it back where unnecessary as we right-size the force as requirements are needed on the ground, and we’re dialing it up where it’s necessary, based upon the needs on the ground.” Keen estimated military operations to date have totaled about $250 million.last_img read more

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Panama Commits To Fight Against Drug Trafficking

first_img Panamanian authorities have declared war on drug trafficking and organized crime. Officials carried out the largest narcotics seizure of the year earlier this month when the National Naval Air Service of Panama (SENAN) captured a speed boat that crashed into a seafront house in the city of Colón, on the Caribbean Sea. SENAN officials found more than 2,400 kilos (5,280 pounds) of cocaine on the vessel. A Colombian national was arrested, but the other three crew members on the boat managed to escape. “It doesn’t seem coincidental to me that north of Veraguas [155 miles west of Panama City] there are 15 people in custody for having links to drug trafficking,” Minister of Public Safety José Raúl Mulino told reporters, according to EFE. “This shipment [contained] ski masks, knives and military ammunition apparently for these people.” Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli said the region needs a strategic counter-narcotics policy, during a summit of the Central American Integration System (SICA) earlier this month in El Salvador. “Many people die unnecessarily due to drugs, the same drugs that prompt corruption and discourage investment,” said Ricardo Martinelli, as reported by the Panamanian daily La Prensa. In 2009, Panamanian law enforcement agencies confiscated 52.1 tons of cocaine and 1.7 tons of marijuana, according to the Public Ministry. Officials also said US$11 million in cash was seized, US$3.2 million more than the previous year. Javier Caraballo, the country’s drug prosecutor, said authorities have identified Mexican criminal organizations in Panama that are working with Mexico-based drug cartels. But he added the seizures by Panamanian officials have decreased the illegal activities of national and international criminal organizations. “We have seen cases in which almost all the people apprehended, linked to these shipments, are Mexicans that don’t have a permanent residence in the country,” said Caraballo, as reported by EFE. “However, they arrived [in the country] to organize drug trafficking.” An undercover agent from the Judicial Investigations Directorate (DIJ) of the National Police told Infosurhoy.com that criminals from Latin American countries are also in Panama to supervise their illegal businesses. But local law enforcement agencies are trying to prevent them from establishing a presence. “Guatemalans, Hondurans and Colombians are coming [here] to control and oversee their operations on Panamanian territory,” said the narcotics agent, who only spoke on condition of anonymity because her life could be in jeopardy if her identity were revealed. “Now it has become more difficult for them [drug traffickers] to infiltrate ‘agents,’ but they continue to look for new strategies.” The source said that drug seizures in 2009 reflect increased efforts by counter-narcotic agencies and the naval air bases monitoring the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. “The new strategies and operational exercises and coordination with international organizations make drug traffickers find new ways and routes to traffic narcotics,” she said. By Dialogo July 29, 2010last_img read more

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