Hot August Music Festival Announces 2019 Lineup: Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Turkuaz, Melvin Seals, Billy Strings, More

first_imgHot August Music Festival will return for another year of music and fun at Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville, MD this summer on Saturday, August 17th. On Friday, organizers for the one-day music festival shared the lineup of performers for this year’s event, which is led by Maryland natives Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, in addition to Turkuaz, Billy Strings, and Melvin Seals & Jerry Garcia Band, just to name a few.Related: Turkuaz’s Mikey Carubba To Host March Funk Sessions With Members Of Motet, Thievery Corporation, RAQ, MoreOther artists included in the Hot August 2019 lineup poster shared on Friday morning include Samantha Fish, Cedric Burnside, The Lil Smokies, The Dirty Grass Players, Larry McCray, Travers Brothership, Vanessa Collier, and The Old Part of Town.The late-summer event will open its gates starting at 11 a.m., with performances continuing throughout what will likely be a hot August day (hence the name) before ending at 10 p.m. Families are also encouraged to bring their children to enjoy the day of music and fun in the sun, as kids under the age of 12 are welcome into the event free of charge.Tickets for this year’s Hot August Music Festival go on sale next Friday, March 22nd. Fans can visit the official event website for more details and ticketing information.last_img read more

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Billy Strings & Cris Jacobs Cover Grateful Dead, Tom Petty, More At Aiken Bluegrass Festival [Videos]

first_imgGuitarists Billy Strings and Cris Jacobs welcomed a mix of guest musicians during their performance at this year’s Aiken Bluegrass Festival in South Carolina over the weekend. It was during Strings’ late-night “Psychedelic Circus” set on Saturday where he and Jacobs delivered a mix of notable rock covers alongside special guests including Circles Around The Sun guitarist Neal Casal, singer Lindsay Lou, and bassist Royal Masat.Related: Watch Billy Strings Throw Down At 2018 Aiken Bluegrass FestivalThe band’s first set included performances of Edgar Winter Group‘s “Hangin’ Around”, Grateful Dead‘s “Althea”, and ZZ Top‘s “Cheap Sunglasses” to start things off. From there, they pulled a page out of Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers‘ songbook to perform “Runnin’ Down A Dream” and “Breakdown”, in addition to a pair of Jimi Hendrix tunes in “Red House” and “Fire”. The band closed the first half fo the show with Chuck Berry‘s blues-rock anthem, “Johnny B. Goode”.Following set break, the group returned to start their second-half run of classic rock covers with Black Sabbath‘s “Paranoid” and Jerry Garcia‘s “Deal”. The band continued with Pearl Jam‘s “Corduroy” which went right into “Down By The River” out of the Neil Young songbook. Following performances of “Funk 49”, “Dear Mr. Fantasy”, and “Big River”, the band launched into another two-song segue beginning with Dr. John‘s funky “Right Place Wrong Time” into “That’s What Love Will Make You Do”.The second set continued with Led Zeppelin‘s “Good Times Bad Times”, Junior Parker‘s “Mystery Train”, and returning to Sabbath for “Sweet Leaf” to close. The show’s one-song encore saw the band send fans into the early hours of the morning with a performance of “Iko Iko”. Fans can relive some of the second set covers from Saturday’s performance below.Billy Strings & Cris Jacobs ‘Psychedelic Circus’ – “Paranoid” – 5/11/2019[Video: T Shaw’s Progressive Bluegrass]Billy Strings & Cris Jacobs ‘Psychedelic Circus’ – “Corduroy” > “Down By The River” – 5/11/2019[Video: T Shaw’s Progressive Bluegrass]Billy Strings & Cris Jacobs ‘Psychedelic Circus’ – “Right Place Wrong Time” > “That’s What Love Will Make You Do” – 5/11/2019[Video: T Shaw’s Progressive Bluegrass]Billy Strings & Cris Jacobs ‘Psychedelic Circus’ – “Good Times Bad Times”[Video: T Shaw’s Progressive Bluegrass]Billy Strings’ 2019 spring tour will continue later this week with a show at the Rives Theatre in Martinsville, VA on Thursday (May 16th). For ticketing information and a full list of upcoming Billy Strings tour dates, head to his website here.Cris Jacobs also has a number of upcoming dates on his Color Where You Are 2019 tour. You can check out a full list of shows and ticketing information on his website here.Setlist: Billy Strings and Cris Jacobs Band ‘Psychedelic Circus’ | Aiken Bluegrass Festival | Aiken, SC | 5/11/2019Set One: Hangin’ Around (Edgar Winter Group cover), Farther Up The Road (Bobby “Blue” Bland cover), Althea (Grateful Dead cover), Whiskey In The Jar (Traditional cover), Cheap Tequila (Johnny Winter cover), Cheap Sunglasses (ZZ Top cover), Breakdown (Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers cover), Going Down The Road Feelin’ Bad (Traditional cover) > Runnin’ Down A Dream (Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers cover), Red House (Jimi Hendrix cover), Fire (Jimi Hendrix cover), Johnny B. Goode (Chuck Berry cover)Set Two: Paranoid (Black Sabbath cover), Deal (Jerry Garcia cover), Corduroy (Pearl Jam cover) > Down By The River (Neil Young cover), Funk 49 (James Gang cover), Dear Mr. Fantasy (Traffic cover), Big River (Johnny Cash cover), Right Place Wrong Time (Dr. John cover) > That’s What Love Will Make You Do (Thigpen, Banks and Marion cover), Good Times Bad Times (Led Zeppelin cover), Mystery Train (Junior Parker), Funky Bitch (Son Seals cover), Sweet Leaf (Black Sabbath cover)Encore: Iko Iko (James “Sugar Boy” Crawford cover)[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

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Benefiting society, scholarship

first_imgFor more than two decades, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) has awarded its Centennial Medal to a select group of graduates who have made significant contributions to society and scholarship. This year’s recipients: one of the world’s foremost scholars of Shakespeare and Renaissance drama; the founder, publisher, and principal editor of a scholarly journal; an economist and a 2007 Nobel laureate; and one of the most eminent of American philosophers.Receiving the medal today (May 27) are David Bevington, Stephen Fischer-Galati, Eric Maskin, and Martha Nussbaum.David Bevington ’52, Ph.D. ’59, English David Bevington is the Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the Humanities at the University of Chicago, where he has taught since 1967. One of the world’s foremost scholars of Shakespeare and Renaissance drama, Bevington has written or edited more than 30 volumes on Shakespeare and his contemporaries. His authored books include “From ‘Mankind’ to Marlowe: Growth of Structure in the Popular Drama of Tudor England” (1962), “Action Is Eloquence: Shakespeare’s Language of Gesture” (1985), and “Shakespeare’s Ideas: More Things in Heaven and Earth” (2008). His new book, forthcoming from Oxford University Press, is “Murder Most Foul: The History of Hamlet.” Bevington has edited the Bantam Shakespeare, in 29 volumes (1988, now being re-edited), and Longman’s “Complete Works of Shakespeare,” sixth edition (2009). He is the former president of the Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society (1981-86), the Shakespeare Association of America (1976-77 and 1995-96), and the Renaissance English Text Society (1977-80). He is senior editor of the Revels Plays (Manchester University Press), which publishes critical editions of plays of Shakespeare’s contemporaries, and the Revels Student Editions. He was senior editor of the “Norton Anthology of Renaissance Drama” (2002) and is one of three senior editors of a forthcoming Cambridge edition of “The Works of Ben Jonson.”Stephen Fischer-Galati ’46, Ph.D. ’49, history Stephen Fischer-Galati is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Colorado. He is the founder, publisher, and principal editor of the scholarly journal East European Quarterly and the scholarly series East European Monographs, which has put out more than 700 scholarly books on East-Central Europe in collaboration with Columbia University Press. Fischer-Galati is one of the world’s foremost specialists on East European history and civilization, exploring the evolution of East-West relations and the intersection of Western and Eastern political and cultural developments. He has also published extensively on Balkan issues and guerilla warfare in the region. Born in Romania, Fischer-Galati escaped the country as a teenager during the early stages of World War II, finishing his high school studies in Massachusetts before going on to Harvard. His books include “Romania: A Historic Perspective,” “Eastern Europe and the Cold War: Perceptions and Perspectives,” and “Man, State, and Society in East European History,” and he has authored more than 250 articles. He holds several honorary degrees and major grants and fellowships from American and international scholarly foundations. He is also the president of the International Commission of East European and Slavic Studies of the International Congress of Historical Studies.Eric Maskin ’72, Ph.D. ’76, applied mathematics Eric Stark Maskin is an economist and a 2007 Nobel laureate recognized (along with Leonid Hurwicz and Roger B. Myerson) “for having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory.” Among other critical applications, that theory has helped economists identify efficient trading mechanisms, regulation schemes, and voting procedures. Maskin is the Albert O. Hirschman Professor of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study and a visiting lecturer with the rank of professor at Princeton University. After earning his doctorate at Harvard, Maskin went to the University of Cambridge in 1976, where he was a research fellow at Jesus College, and then taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1977-84) and at Harvard (1985-2000), where he was the Louis Berkman Professor of Economics. His work in economic theory, including game theory, the economics of incentives, and contract theory, has deeply influenced diverse areas of economics, politics, and law. He is particularly well-known for his papers on mechanism design/implementation theory and dynamic games. His current research projects include comparing different electoral rules, examining the causes of inequality, and studying coalition formation. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and the European Economic Association, and he is a corresponding fellow of the British Academy. He was president of the Econometric Society in 2003.Martha Nussbaum, Ph.D. ’75, classical philology Martha Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago, with appointments in the Law School, the Philosophy Department, and the Divinity School. Among the most eminent of American philosophers, her wide-ranging interests include ancient notions of ethics, feminism, religious equality, gender and sexuality law, global justice, and notions of disgust, shame, and other emotions and their various effects on the law. She has taught at Harvard, Brown, and Oxford universities. Among her many books the most recent are “The Clash Within: Democracy, Religious Violence, and India’s Future” (2007), “Liberty of Conscience: In Defense of America’s Tradition of Religious Equality” (2008), and “From Disgust to Humanity: Sexual Orientation and Constitutional Law” (2010). From 1986 to 1993, Nussbaum was a research adviser at the World Institute for Development Economics Research, Helsinki, a part of the United Nations University. She is former president of the Central Division of the American Philosophical Association, and she has chaired the Association’s Committee on International Cooperation, its Committee on the Status of Women, and its Committee on Public Philosophy. Nussbaum is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, which in 2009 awarded her its Henry M. Phillips Prize in Jurisprudence.last_img read more

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Academy of Management awards Noam T. Wasserman

first_imgNoam T. Wasserman, associate professor at Harvard Business School (HBS), has won the Innovation in Entrepreneurship Pedagogy Award from the Academy of Management in recognition of his second-year M.B.A. elective course “Founders’ Dilemmas.”Based on his research during the past decade, the popular course examines the early founding decisions that have important and often unexpected long-term consequences for both founders and their enterprises.He will formally receive the award at the academy’s annual meeting in Montreal in August. Wasserman earned a Ph.D. in organizational behavior from Harvard in 2002 and an M.B.A. (with high distinction as a Baker Scholar) from HBS in 1999.last_img read more

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Like-minded

first_img“You need to create a political constituency around the children’s success,” Bush said. He called for a nationwide political campaign to “put a face” on the price of failures in the U.S. education system.The panelists also discussed the political climate for education reform and how it might change with a newly divided Congress. Podesta, director of the Center for American Progress in Washington, repeatedly called for sustaining the “political momentum” for education reform created by No Child Left Behind. (Even Spellings, one of the chief architects of NCLB, said the law has become “radioactive” politically.)“The middle’s been hollowed out in this Congress,” Podesta said. Despite partisan tension, he said, there might still be majority support for building accountability into the system.Podesta, who led Obama’s White House transition team two years ago, praised Race to the Top, the president’s $10 billion education fund set aside for states that prioritize and demonstrate significant school reforms.“I think this idea that you can use an incentive to create change through competition among the states will catch on,” Podesta said. “You can use relatively scarce dollars to move things along more rapidly.”While competition for the money has appeared to energize some of the worst-performing states, the panelists said, money alone will not fix the education system.Even in tough financial times, Rhee said, school districts can still achieve reform.“Budget cuts could be used as an opportunity … to push some significant changes in these age-old, dinosaurish policies,” said Rhee, cited hiring, salary, and layoff practices that favor teachers with seniority, despite, she said, no demonstrable evidence that more experience in the classroom equates to better teaching.“The answer isn’t always money,” Bush said. “There needs to be a compelling story.”Where should reformers turn to find that compelling narrative? In the night’s first real instance of strange bedfellows, Bush said that Obama could be the person to sell education reform to the public as a national priority. Three of the nation’s leading advocates for standards-based education reform — former Washington, D.C., chancellor of schools Michelle Rhee, former Florida governor Jeb Bush, and former Clinton White House chief of staff John Podesta — called for teacher accountability and scalable school reforms during a discussion at the Harvard Kennedy School Thursday night (Nov. 18).“Strange Bedfellows: The Politics of Education and the Future of Reform” drew a crowd to the Institute of Politics’ (IOP) John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum. The event’s name was somewhat ironic, given the ease and agreement with which the big-name panelists dove into the major education issues of the day.“It’s like we have Mick Jagger, Bruce Springsteen, and Tina Turner together on the same stage,” said moderator Margaret Spellings, secretary of education under George W. Bush. (For the many undergraduates in the audience, Spellings translated her reference to Jay-Z, Justin Bieber, and Lady Gaga, drawing laughter.)The panelists discussed how to use business-style organizational reform to improve America’s worst-performing schools. Among the ideas promoted were merit-based pay and promotions for teachers, giving school principals more control over funds, and scrapping states’ teacher certification processes in order to draw the best midcareer professionals into the classroom.Currently, “we don’t want to differentiate among teachers,” Rhee said. “If you tell a teacher they’re not doing a good job, it’s like you’re attacking the entire profession.”The evening began with an assessment of Rhee and Bush’s rocky but productive tenures working with the D.C. and Florida schools. Rhee in particular was punished by her District constituents, who voted out her boss, Mayor Adrian Fenty, in this year’s Democratic primary. Bush now runs the Foundation for Excellence in Education; Rhee said she is unsure of her next move.The primary lesson from their time in office, they said, was that playing politics is more effective than playing nice if one wants to achieve reform.Bush took pride in his stance toward teachers’ unions and school districts, calling it “Jeb’s Way.” During his tenure as governor from 1999 to 2007, Florida’s high school graduation rate jumped from 60 percent to just shy of 80 percent, he said.“I made education the chief political issue before I made it the chief policy issue,” said Bush, who is finishing a weeklong visiting fellowship at IOP. “If you have a passion for something, you shouldn’t keep it a secret.”After her first two years in office, Rhee said, Washington was leading the nation in gains in both math and reading on the national NAEP exam. But she and Fenty were voted out for failing to “figure out the political dynamic,” she said.The speakers agreed that America’s public schools lack a grass-roots base to demand reform.“The problem is there is no organized interest group in this country that defends and promotes what’s right for kids,” Rhee said.last_img read more

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‘Spider-Man,’ the scavenger hunt

first_imgWhen Sony Pictures contacted the Harvard Museum of Natural History about doing something fun to accompany the release of the new movie “The Amazing Spider-Man,” museum officials had a creative idea.The museum drew thousands of new visitors last year with its Harry Potter Scavenger Hunt. Its new Spider Sense! Scavenger Hunt promises to entertain fans of Spider-Man and natural science alike. “We took a pop culture theme and used it as a segue into natural history and science,” said Janis Sacco, director of exhibitions at the museum. “It’s an interesting way to introduce people to science.”The scavenger hunt helps visitors to understand the relationships between the fictional superhero and the natural world. Visitors can pick up a scavenger hunt sheet at the front desk and explore the spider exhibit and others that relate to Spider-Man’s powers, and see a live tarantula.“We took a pop culture theme and used it as a segue into natural history and science,” said Janis Sacco, director of exhibitions at the museum. “It’s an interesting way to introduce people to science.”The film is a refreshed take on the classic Marvel comic book series, in which Peter Parker, a young photographer, is bitten by a radioactive spider and gains superpowers, such as the ability to make webs of strong silk and to crawl on walls, as well as a “sixth sense” that allows him to sense and locate danger.Although the sixth sense is a fairly common premise for science fiction, the ability for an animal to have such a sense and similar extraordinary powers is not fictional at all.“We humans understand five senses,” said Sacco. “However, other animals do use other senses. It’s not at all impossible for Spider-Man to have the sixth sense because other animals do.” For example, certain fish have the ability to sense danger; they can anticipate encroaching predators and escape quickly. Spider-Man’s ability to shoot super-strong cables from his fingers is not wholly unrealistic either. Pound for pound, spider silk is tougher than Kevlar and stronger than steel, noted Sacco.Mariah O’Brien, 9, a student at the Bates School in Salem, Mass., looks at a preserved sea spider as part of the Spider Sense! Scavenger Hunt.The scavenger hunt will run daily from now until Sept. 3, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  According to museum officials, wall-crawling ability and tolerance to numbing toxins are not required.last_img read more

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A patio space transformed

first_imgEnvisioning a green space as inviting and social as it would be operative and effective, students Ecaterina Dobrescu and Rebecca Bartlett of the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) set out last semester to transform a concrete patio space at Gund Hall into a modular system of vegetation and planters that could absorb and purify stormwater.Funded by an Office for Sustainability student grant, “Stormwater Modules” seeks to test flexible design and the capacity of a small-scale system to reduce the quantity of stormwater runoff from rooftops to help improve water quality.Stormwater management has long been employed across the country to collect rainwater and melted snow that runs off from streets, lawns, and buildings. As the rainwater flows off these surfaces and into rivers and streams, it picks up chemicals and other harmful pollutants. Traditional stormwater management often neglects the natural world’s steps of slow and timely absorption, purification, and replenishment. Increasingly, municipalities and building owners are seeking new and innovative strategies to collect stormwater runoff and purify it before it re-enters rivers and streams.Inspired both by an independent study on the performance of stormwater management systems at Harvard and by an effort to design a green roof for the GSD, Dobrescu and Bartlett chose one of Gund Hall’s south-facing patios as their test site. Removing some of the individual pavers on the patio’s surface, they replaced the concrete slabs with moveable and interchangeable planters filled with various types of succulent plants. By replacing the traditional pavers with these nature-inspired modules, the project aims to reduce the quantity and speed of stormwater running off the building’s roof.In addition to the rooftop planters, the students installed a test site for comparing the water that is collected and released on the unaltered patio with the water collected and released by the planters.  To test and study the absorbability of the plants, the students used hydrogel beads, a modern material designed to absorb water and slowly release it back into the atmosphere. In one Plexiglas box, the students placed only hydrogel beads, and in the other box they placed a layer of beads underneath one of their planters. As the beads expand and fill the boxes, the students will be able to compare rates and amounts of stormwater absorbed.The hope, Dobrescu said, is that these planters provide a small-scale but practical and replicable solution to a substantial environmental challenge. “We hope that students and other green teams will take this modular system further, bringing it to other campus spaces with similar conditions. The system is designed to be moved, changed, and adapted.”Dobrescu and Bartlett also built chairs and stools for the patio that added a social dynamic to the space while also functioning as stormwater modules. The seating was built out of recycled pallet wood from the GSD and can be rearranged easily according to students’ needs. The idea, Dobrescu said, was to create a greater draw for students, staff, and faculty to enjoy the outdoor spaces the GSD offers, raising the social quality of the building. “We’ve heard positive feedback from the students, and we’re excited that they’re embracing this redesigned space,” she said.Dobrescu and Bartlett worked collaboratively with the GSD Green Team, Harvard’s Environmental Health and Services team, and GSD facilities manager Kevin Cahill. “Everyone was extremely helpful and enthusiastic. The success of this project is in large part due to Kevin’s openness to new ideas,” Dobrescu said. “We also greatly appreciated his aid in solving some of the technical difficulties.”For Cahill, the success is seeing the research being done at the GSD turned into action. “It’s terrific to see the facilities be used as a laboratory for research, and it’s nice to see the research conducted in a social space rather than a gallery setting,” he said.Dobrescu and Bartlett also credit the GSD and the student grant program. “In the last year, we’ve been challenged to think about sustainability in a new way,” Dobrescu said. “With new ideas being born at the GSD every day, we were pushed and inspired to come up with an innovative solution to a real-world, environmental problem. The student grant program allowed us to take our ideas a step further, and we’re excited to test and study the results of this project.”last_img read more

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Three cups of milk a day? That may be too many

first_imgFederal dietary guidelines recommending that Americans of all ages consume three cups per day of reduced fat milk or other dairy products may be influenced more by lobbying from the dairy industry than by scientific evidence, according to a new commentary co-authored by Walter Willett, Fredrick John Stare Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. He and co-author David Ludwig of Boston Children’s Hospital argue that a broader range of recommendations for milk consumption may be more appropriate.The commentary was published online July 1 in JAMA Pediatrics.Adults who eat a healthy diet may already be getting sufficient vitamin D and bone-building calcium from other sources such as kale or fortified orange juice, according to the researchers. Children may need the recommended daily glasses of milk if they have poor diets; however whether they should be drinking whole or skim milk is up for debate.While federal guidelines call for fat-free or reduced fat milk to protect against obesity, the researchers counter that it may have the opposite effect. Fats are digested slowly, leaving people fuller for longer. Reducing dietary fat may prompt some to eat more in order to feel satiated, they write. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Living near foreclosed homes may raise risk of being overweight

first_img Read Full Story People who live near foreclosed homes may be at greater risk of being overweight than those who don’t have such homes in their immediate neighborhoods, according to a new study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers.The study was published online July 18, 2013 in the American Journal of Public Health and will appear in the September 2013 print edition.“Millions of homes went into foreclosure during the Great Recession, and housing markets in many areas of the country are still struggling to recover. People living next door to foreclosed properties have been hit hard by the housing crisis; their homes may have lost value, and blighted houses on the block make many people feel less safe,” said lead author Mariana Arcaya, SD ’13, research scientist in the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. “While our study wasn’t designed to pinpoint the mechanisms by which foreclosures put neighbors at risk of weight gain, previous research tells us that eating and drinking more are common reactions to stress, and that dangerous blocks may discourage physical activity.”Arcaya and her colleagues analyzed housing and medical data from 2,078 study participants in Massachusetts from 1987-2008. They looked at foreclosure records as well as participants’ proximity to foreclosed homes and their body mass index (BMI) levels. They found that living within 100 meters of a foreclosed home significantly increased the likelihood of having a higher BMI. Living near foreclosed homes was also associated with higher odds of being overweight.last_img read more

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