Benefiting society, scholarship

first_imgFor more than two decades, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) has awarded its Centennial Medal to a select group of graduates who have made significant contributions to society and scholarship. This year’s recipients: one of the world’s foremost scholars of Shakespeare and Renaissance drama; the founder, publisher, and principal editor of a scholarly journal; an economist and a 2007 Nobel laureate; and one of the most eminent of American philosophers.Receiving the medal today (May 27) are David Bevington, Stephen Fischer-Galati, Eric Maskin, and Martha Nussbaum.David Bevington ’52, Ph.D. ’59, English David Bevington is the Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the Humanities at the University of Chicago, where he has taught since 1967. One of the world’s foremost scholars of Shakespeare and Renaissance drama, Bevington has written or edited more than 30 volumes on Shakespeare and his contemporaries. His authored books include “From ‘Mankind’ to Marlowe: Growth of Structure in the Popular Drama of Tudor England” (1962), “Action Is Eloquence: Shakespeare’s Language of Gesture” (1985), and “Shakespeare’s Ideas: More Things in Heaven and Earth” (2008). His new book, forthcoming from Oxford University Press, is “Murder Most Foul: The History of Hamlet.” Bevington has edited the Bantam Shakespeare, in 29 volumes (1988, now being re-edited), and Longman’s “Complete Works of Shakespeare,” sixth edition (2009). He is the former president of the Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society (1981-86), the Shakespeare Association of America (1976-77 and 1995-96), and the Renaissance English Text Society (1977-80). He is senior editor of the Revels Plays (Manchester University Press), which publishes critical editions of plays of Shakespeare’s contemporaries, and the Revels Student Editions. He was senior editor of the “Norton Anthology of Renaissance Drama” (2002) and is one of three senior editors of a forthcoming Cambridge edition of “The Works of Ben Jonson.”Stephen Fischer-Galati ’46, Ph.D. ’49, history Stephen Fischer-Galati is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Colorado. He is the founder, publisher, and principal editor of the scholarly journal East European Quarterly and the scholarly series East European Monographs, which has put out more than 700 scholarly books on East-Central Europe in collaboration with Columbia University Press. Fischer-Galati is one of the world’s foremost specialists on East European history and civilization, exploring the evolution of East-West relations and the intersection of Western and Eastern political and cultural developments. He has also published extensively on Balkan issues and guerilla warfare in the region. Born in Romania, Fischer-Galati escaped the country as a teenager during the early stages of World War II, finishing his high school studies in Massachusetts before going on to Harvard. His books include “Romania: A Historic Perspective,” “Eastern Europe and the Cold War: Perceptions and Perspectives,” and “Man, State, and Society in East European History,” and he has authored more than 250 articles. He holds several honorary degrees and major grants and fellowships from American and international scholarly foundations. He is also the president of the International Commission of East European and Slavic Studies of the International Congress of Historical Studies.Eric Maskin ’72, Ph.D. ’76, applied mathematics Eric Stark Maskin is an economist and a 2007 Nobel laureate recognized (along with Leonid Hurwicz and Roger B. Myerson) “for having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory.” Among other critical applications, that theory has helped economists identify efficient trading mechanisms, regulation schemes, and voting procedures. Maskin is the Albert O. Hirschman Professor of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study and a visiting lecturer with the rank of professor at Princeton University. After earning his doctorate at Harvard, Maskin went to the University of Cambridge in 1976, where he was a research fellow at Jesus College, and then taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1977-84) and at Harvard (1985-2000), where he was the Louis Berkman Professor of Economics. His work in economic theory, including game theory, the economics of incentives, and contract theory, has deeply influenced diverse areas of economics, politics, and law. He is particularly well-known for his papers on mechanism design/implementation theory and dynamic games. His current research projects include comparing different electoral rules, examining the causes of inequality, and studying coalition formation. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and the European Economic Association, and he is a corresponding fellow of the British Academy. He was president of the Econometric Society in 2003.Martha Nussbaum, Ph.D. ’75, classical philology Martha Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago, with appointments in the Law School, the Philosophy Department, and the Divinity School. Among the most eminent of American philosophers, her wide-ranging interests include ancient notions of ethics, feminism, religious equality, gender and sexuality law, global justice, and notions of disgust, shame, and other emotions and their various effects on the law. She has taught at Harvard, Brown, and Oxford universities. Among her many books the most recent are “The Clash Within: Democracy, Religious Violence, and India’s Future” (2007), “Liberty of Conscience: In Defense of America’s Tradition of Religious Equality” (2008), and “From Disgust to Humanity: Sexual Orientation and Constitutional Law” (2010). From 1986 to 1993, Nussbaum was a research adviser at the World Institute for Development Economics Research, Helsinki, a part of the United Nations University. She is former president of the Central Division of the American Philosophical Association, and she has chaired the Association’s Committee on International Cooperation, its Committee on the Status of Women, and its Committee on Public Philosophy. Nussbaum is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, which in 2009 awarded her its Henry M. Phillips Prize in Jurisprudence.last_img read more

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EPA funds turf projects

first_imgAlumnus support led to grantLandry said the Georgia-North Carolina EPA grant was madepossible by the efforts of the Georgia Turfgrass Association, theNorth Carolina Turfgrass Council and a UGA alumnus.”The main individual who made this grant possible is Sam Lang, aUGA CAES graduate,” Landry said. A native of Swainsboro Ga., Lang now owns a professional lawn carecompany in Raleigh, N.C. “Since he graduated, Sam has kept inclose contact with our college,” Landry said. “He relied on ourExtension specialists for recommendations when he worked in theAtlanta area. He has also helped recruit students for our collegeand served as a guest lecturer in turfgrass classes.”The urban agriculture industry in Georgia, which includesturfgrass, provides more than 79,000 jobs and annuallygenerates more than $8.1 billion to the state’seconomy. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaUniversity of Georgia and North Carolina State Universityresearchers have received more than $650,000 in grant funds fromthe Environmental Protection Agency for turfgrass research intheir home states.In Georgia, the grant will be used over the next two years tofund eight turfgrass research projects in the UGA College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences. Less inputs, impact on environment”All of these projects relate to turfgrass’ overall environmentalimpact on our state,” Landry said. “Our main objective is to lookat improving sustainability of turfgrass management in ourenvironment. We know that turfgrasses can significantly improve the environment in many ways. We are constantly examining ways to produce healthy turfgrass using the least amount of inputs.”Turfgrasses reduce soil erosion, and improve water quality in the process, Landry said. Turfgrasses also absorb carbon dioxide and other harmful gases while releasing oxygen and cooling the environment.Industry leaders, like Georgia Turfgrass Association Past-President Ken Morrow, look forward to reaping the benefits of theresults of the new research projects.”The main benefit I see is the project will identifysustainable turfgrass systems for climates in this region,”Morrow, president of Sod Atlanta, said. “I also see the benefitsof identifying the potential enhancements to the environment thatturfgrass provides, such as errosion control and generalenvironmental enhancement.”center_img Industry, consumers will benefit”These funds are allowing us to do projects that we would not beable to do otherwise,” said Gil Landry, coordinator of theGeorgia Center for Urban Agriculture on the UGA campus inGriffin, Ga. “Each research project we complete directly impactsturfgrass professionals and most will also impact individual homeowners in the state.”The grant will fund UGA Seashore Paspalum turfgrass breedingefforts. Seashore paspalum can be irrigated using a wide qualityrange of water, including seawater, brackish water and recycledwater. The grass needs only minimal pesticides and judiciousapplications of fertilizers.UGA scientists also plan to use the grant funds to investigatealternative methods of turfgrass insect control, theenvironmental fate of pesticides used on turfgrass, turfgrassdisease control, environmental management of turfgrass and usingturfgrass for erosion control.UGA agricultural economists will study economic value of the industry and individual lawns to property owners.last_img read more

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Routines for Kids

first_imgOnce the school year starts, developing and keeping a consistent schedule is vital to children’s health and well-being, says Diane Bales, a child development specialist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.As summer winds down and preparations for the upcoming school year begin, Bales recommends that parents establish a routine. A routine provides security for children and helps reduce the stress of the new school year.“The younger the children are, the more they rely on that security to know what to expect in their day and in their life,” said Bales, an associate professor in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Science. “Setting up that routine and practicing the steps reduces anxiety on the first day of school and helps make the transition from summer to school much smoother.”The most challenging change in schedule from summer to the school year comes at bedtime. During the summer, parents may be more relaxed about their children’s bedtime, knowing that the children don’t have to get up early the next day. Bales suggests that parents start establishing an earlier bedtime at least a week before school starts; changing that bedtime overnight is unlikely to produce positive results.“If your children have been going to bed at 9 and they need to go to bed at 7 or 7:30 to get enough sleep for school, they won’t easily fall asleep when you put them to bed at 7:30 right away. Moving bedtime back 15 minutes every night for a week is going to be more effective,” Bales said. “It gets you closer to actually having them on the schedule that you want them to have.”Bales also points to the importance of getting children to wind down before they go to bed. Activities that stimulate the mind — like watching TV or using an electronic device — may prevent them from sleeping when they’re supposed to, says Bales.“Maybe take a bath, brush your teeth or read a book. Just have some quiet, settled-down time,” Bales said. “It doesn’t mean that they’re never going to resist and never going to be unhappy when it’s time to go to bed, but be consistent. Over time, it really does give them that security.”Parents are also encouraged to prepare the night before the start of school in order to make the first morning of school easier. Lay out clothes ahead of time. Make lunch the night before. Put essentials like books or bookbags in designated places. This allows for a more peaceful morning for the children and for parents to get ready in a timely manner.last_img read more

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Brazil Says No Decision For Now on Fighter Contract

first_img Brazilian Defense Minister Nelson Jobim on 25 January ruled out for now a decision on a multi-billion dollar fighter aircraft contract vied for by France, Sweden and the United States. Jobim said he hopes the competition will be resolved this year but at the moment the government is too tied up dealing with the aftermath of floods and mudslides that left 830 people dead and 25,000 homeless near Rio. “This is not the moment to decide,” he said. “We are in an emergency situation, with rains and disasters,” the state-run Agencia Brasil quoted him as saying. The contract for 36 fighters has an initial value estimated at $4 billion to $10 billion, with the possibility of many more aircraft in the future. But the competition has dragged on for years, with President Dilma Rousseff inheriting it from her predecessor Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva. Jobim indicated that despite the latest setback, the bidding would not go back to square one, and said Russia’s Sukhoi fighters would not be allowed back into the running. “There is nothing like that,” he said. “The Russians were already disqualified at the start of the process.” He said the only fighters under consideration were the French-made Rafale, the Swedish Gripen NG and the US F-18 Super Hornet. A decision on the bid will be followed by at least 12 months of complex negotiations on technical matters and the terms of the deal, Jobim said. Brazil wants the deal to include not just the aircraft but also technology transfers. Lula had said he favored the Rafale, but in the end he opted to leave the decision to his successor. By Dialogo January 27, 2011last_img read more

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February 1, 2004 Letters

first_imgFebruary 1, 2004 Letters I read the inspiring story about attorney Nancy Lugo’s kidney donation in the January 1 News. While not many people have the courage to donate an organ while alive, many of us who have signed organ donor cards would like to give someone a second chance at life before our demise.Here is how. While you are donating blood, you can ask to join the National Marrow Donor Program Registry. Thousands of children and adults have leukemia and other life-threatening blood diseases, and need marrow or stem cells to survive. Most of them cannot find a match in their own families, or even among other donors. The more adults who donate, the more likely they’ll find a match.You can save someone’s life right now. It just takes a little blood to become part of the registry. Please remember this the next time you donate blood.Laurie Kaufman Amber South MiamiBriefly.. . February 1, 2004 Regular News Rule of Lawcenter_img I have great respect for Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead, but I think he is wrong when he says 88 new judgeships are needed to “ensure the rule of law in Florida is not compromised.”The governor and legislature have already compromised the rule of law in Florida, although we hope not irreparably. Consider Ms. Schiavo, the annual jousting with Roe v. Wade, the movement to give the governor carte blanche in appointment of judges, etc. The question now is whether salvation is possible.We have precedent for our pessimism. The response of the governor and legislature to the underfunding of public education (resulting in crowded schools and ill-prepared students) was to further reduce funding for public schools and divert millions of public dollars into private and “virtual” schools that need not hire qualified staff or be accredited, need not account for the educational progress of their students, and apparently need not even account for their use of public funds.If the governor and legislature do to the judicial system what they did to public schools, I would look for public funds to be drained into a private system in which all proceedings are closed except to the participants, there are no court reporters or appeals, no record of proceedings except perhaps a notation of the result, “courts” make up their own rules as they go along, and convene in storefronts, warehouses, and private homes, or on-line in virtual courtrooms, and “judges” need have no qualifications to serve.We (the Bar) may find ourselves doing for the judicial system what the parents of public school students have to do just to see that public schools have basic facilites and supplies — organize bake sales, sell t-shirts, volunteer one day a week as a J A or deputy clerk, donate legal pads, gavels, and black robes.The chief justice’s request to the governor and legislature for more judges, though quite rational and realistic, may be the most doomed, heartrending plea since Ruby took her love to town.Bill Manikas Boynton BeachThe Gift of Life I was rather amused to read my brother’s letter to the editor in the January 1 News regarding his correction of the citation to Judge Kent’s opinion in the November 15 article “Briefly: How not to write one.” I found it even more amusing, and again ironic, that the editors misspelled the section of the letters to the editor: “Briefy: How not to write one.” Once again, creating an unexpected error to a key part of the article/letter.Could this be a play on words by The Florida Bar News, or is this a joke with the readers that the same editors would make another mistake on the same article? Hopefully, by the next edition another one of our family members will not have to send you a third correction.Once again, you should be disappointed with your editors.Grant A. Kuvin Winter Parklast_img read more

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4 signs your boss is ready for you to hit the road

first_imgIf you feel like your boss no longer wants you around, you could be right. There’s nothing worse than losing your job and not seeing it coming. If you don’t want losing your job to come as a surprise, here are some warning signs that your boss is ready for you to go…They don’t want you to succeed: Did you just do something awesome? Did you finish an amazing project or finalize a big sale? Most bosses would be ecstatic about that. If your boss seems annoyed or irritated, it may be because he doesn’t like that you’re not giving him any reason to let you go.They talk about you behind your back: It’s not professional to complain about someone behind their back. If you find out from your coworkers that your boss is doing this, it’s definitely a bad sign.They start analyzing everything you do: The best bosses don’t micromanage, so if your boss suddenly starts to do that, they might be looking for a reason to let you go. If you’re also receiving constructive feedback, they might just be trying to help you improve. But if not, they’re probably trying to find a reason to justify your dismissal.They start giving you all the worst assignments: By giving you horrible assignments, your boss could be trying to wear you down. Either you’ll get distraught and quit or your work quality will suffer and they’ll have a reason to let you go. Either way, constantly giving you the worst projects might be their way of driving you out. 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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Qatar sends field hospitals to Lebanon

first_imgQatar began flying field hospitals and medical aid to Beirut Wednesday, AFP correspondents saw, to ease pressure on Lebanon’s strained medical system after the previous day’s devastating explosions.Crews at Qatar’s Al-Udeid airbase loaded collapsible beds, generators and burn sheets onto an Emiri Air Force C17 cargo plane, which subsequently took off for Lebanon.It was one of four due to fly from the Gulf to the Mediterranean country Wednesday. Officers estimated at least 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms) of aid would be flown on the inaugural flight, with two hospital units equipped with up to 550 beds due in Beirut by day’s end.Tens of thousands of people were left homeless and thousands more crammed into Beirut’s overwhelmed hospitals for treatment following Tuesday’s catastrophic incident.Qatar’s ruler Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani said on Tuesday that he spoke to Lebanese President Michel Aoun in the wake of the explosions at Beirut’s port and offered the medical aid.Qatar was ready “to provide immediate support following the explosion at the port,” he tweeted. Workers placed personal protective equipment kits on the seats of crew bound for Rafic Hariri airport in Beirut, which was already in the midst of a medical crisis amid a resurgence of coronavirus cases.”If there’s news about humanitarian stuff, there’s a high probability we’ll be on one of the flights,” said one of the pilots on the first of the aid relays to Lebanon from behind the controls of the Globemaster aircraft.Around him crew and loadmasters secured the frames that will form the field hospitals that Lebanese media reported will be erected at strategic points around the capital Beirut.Pilots at Al-Udeid, the largest airstrip in the Middle East and also the United States’ biggest airbase in the region, have been involved in COVID-19 relief flights in recent months.Gas-rich Qatar has sent extensive medical aid to its allies including China and Italy throughout the coronavirus pandemic as it uses its logistical clout and deep pockets to cement diplomatic ties.Commanding officers “started calling last night, giving orders to prepare. It’s not a normal flight, but it’s part of the job,” said a second pilot on the first flight to leave. center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Fruity cider: the new cool?

first_imgSheppy’s Low-Alcohol Classic CiderLaunched: July 2018Premium cider brand Sheppy’s introduced its first low-alcohol SKU last month in response to growing consumer demand for low and no-alcohol options. Created to replicate the flavour of the brand’s traditional cider range with a 0.5% abv, the bottles (rsp: £1.30/500ml) are currently only available online, though the brand has stated it will announce a nationwide listing with a major retailer in September. One thing white cider did have in its favour was that it was cheap. But in Scotland, the introduction of Minimal Unit Pricing (MUP) last May put an end to all that. The 50p per unit policy, designed to discourage binge drinking and alcohol-related illnesses, saw average cider prices jump by 17.8% in the week of its introduction (Brand View, 52 w/e 3 May 2018). A four pack of 330ml cans of K cider, for example, rose from £4.25 to £5.28 at Tesco in the space of a week (Brand View, 25 April 2018 vs 2 May 2018).Now perceptions of white cider as reasonably priced are dropping away across the nation (despite no legislation-led change to price points south of the border). Only 28% of people thought it was cheap in our Harris Interactive survey, and 14% of 18 to 24-year-olds even thought it was expensive. And as Wales gets set to implement MUP in summer 2019 and England faces calls to follow suit, white cider may not be able to rely on price as a selling point for long.Fruity cider, on the other hand, is tapping all the right trends. With brands such as Kopparberg retailing for £2.20 per bottle, it may not be cheap. But it’s Instagrammable (you need only look at the accounts of Kopparberg, Old Mout and Thatcher’s for proof) and two thirds believe it has a good taste and is refreshing. As many as 43% of 18 to 24-year-olds think it’s cool to boot.According to Heineken marketing director Toby Lancaster, these cool credentials have hinged on its diverse range of flavours. “There’s a growing trend of consumers looking to try something different and experiment with flavour profiles,” he says. “We’re seeing a lot of consumers looking to experiment particularly with familiar flavours that have a twist of the unknown.”Indeed, new flavours were a key purchase driver for 22% of fruity cider shoppers in our Harris Interactive research. “These consumers are looking for a refreshing, tasty product in place of blander propositions that have dominated drinking occasions in the past,” explains Kopparberg marketing manager Rob Salvesen. Which shows why consumers are willing to try such unusual flavours as kiwi & lime or passionfruit & apple (see below). The Garden Cider Co BlueberryLaunched: June 2018Made by hand from locally donated fruit, Surrey-based brand The Garden Cider Co launched its new Blueberry flavour across on and off-trade in June. The 500ml bottles (rsp: £3.50) join the brand’s existing seven-strong range of craft ciders, including Elderflower, Dry Hop and Wild Strawberry, each selected for their prevalence in English gardens. Remember when Club 18-30 holidays were cool? For the nineties lad, nothing screamed ‘mad fer it’ more than hitting Faliraki with an overbearing club rep to rack up some painful sunburn (and memories). Today, cool has an altogether different meaning. For the social media generation, it turns out larging it in Magaluf doesn’t scream ‘photo op’. And so Club 18-30 met its official demise this year, pointing to the rise in millennials “wanting to have fancy and cool pictures on Instagram”.What does all this have to do with cider? Well, white cider has many parallels with said Club 18-30. At one point, it was the bevvy of choice for cash-strapped young people looking for a fun night out with their mates. Except it’s not cool anymore (or Instagrammable). And so white cider is in decline, suffering a 2.8% slump in both value and volume over the past year, according to the Westons 2018 Cider Report. Even residing sector champion Frosty Jack’s saw sales slip 3.6% on volumes down 6.3% [Nielsen w/e 21 April 2018].Watch: Young people don’t think white cider is cool  All this is the result of one big image problem. Consumer research from Bestway earlier this year concluded 93% of shoppers had a negative perception of the term ‘white cider’, prompting the wholesaler to rename its White Ace to simply Ace in April. This negative perception was equally evident in the Harris Interactive research. Only a fifth thought it was cool (this figure wasn’t much higher among trend-led 18 to 24-year-olds) and 32% thought it had a great taste. Compare that with the positive perceptions around fruity cider (see below), and you can see why sales are going in that direction. By contrast, its more photogenic rival, fruity cider, is booming. The Westons 2018 Cider Report found it now represents a third of all cider sales. Impressive stuff, considering that figure was as low as 1% in 2008. So what’s getting consumers all excited about fruity cider as opposed to the white stuff? Is there any opportunity for this market to grow further? And can white cider learn any lessons from its fruity friend’s success?Younger people in particular are lapping up fruity cider, according to our exclusive poll of over 600 cider drinkers by Harris Interactive. Nearly half of the total sample (48%) consume it in either bottled or canned form. Among 18 to 24-year-olds, this figure rises to 60%. By contrast, only 16% of this demographic drink bottled white and 31% drink canned white. It’s a discouraging finding among what was white cider’s core market.center_img Kopparberg Cranberry LightLaunched: June 2018Kopparberg’s latest low-calorie option Cranberry Light (rsp: £1.87) rolled out exclusively to Morrisons in June, containing 83 calories per 250ml can. The range, which also includes Raspberry Light (85 calories per 250ml) and Summer Fruits Light (83 calories per 250ml), is set to expand further in 2019.  Kiwi and lime won’t seem experimental for long, though. So to keep up this excitement, brands are continually bringing out new flavours. Stowford Press took aim at younger female drinkers in April with the on-trade launch of a Mixed Berries cider, which is set to hit the retailers later this year. Brand manager Holly Chadwick says the strategy is succeeding in attracting new, younger shoppers. “In the off-trade alone, 25.7 million fruit pints are now being drunk. It’s clear to see that fruit ciders are broadening consumer interest in the wider category,” she says.She believes the momentum of fruity cider isn’t set to slow any time soon. “There’s been substantial interest in fruity cider nationwide, and we expect it to account for just under 50% of all cider sold within the next five years.”White cider clearly can’t compete with all this flavour innovation. But fruity brands are now capitalising on other trends that could serve as lessons for the wider cider category.One trend that caught the eye of Old Mout was the growth in demand for low and no-alcohol products, which have typically targeted the younger generation. “We’ve seen a 20% value increase in ‘no and low’ cider and a rise in consumers who are looking to live better,” says marketing director Toby Lancaster. This prompted the brand to launch its first alcohol-free product – a berries and cherry cider – in April. The NPD aims to provide “a perfect alternative for the health-conscious consumer looking for something alcohol free without compromising on taste, as well as offering a new option for drinkers to enjoy exotic fruit cider during existing cider occasions.” Kopparberg is also targeting health-conscious drinkers, albeit in a different way. The brand expanded its low calories Light range to encompass new Cranberry variant in June, containing 83 calories per 250ml can and joining existing SKUs Summer Fruits Light and Raspberry Light. “As consumers become more health conscious and responsible, cider makers need to ensure that they are prepared by diversifying their portfolios to address these trends and ensure they have appropriate pack formats available to meet these needs,” says Salvesen.Then there has been some savvy marketing activity that targets young people through festivals. Kopparberg brought back its limited edition five-litre KopparKeg for the third time this May with the aim of infiltrating more festival and sharing occasions. Magners has ensured its Original and Dark Fruit cider, launched in December last year following the success of Strongbow Dark Fruits, will be available across 11 festivals this summer through a new partnership with festival operator Global. “We’ve also introduced bespoke Magners Cider Gardens at a number of the festivals,” says group marketing manager Janette Murray. “The Cider Gardens have so far proven to be a focal point of the festival arenas and we’ve even treated attendees to special DJ sets from The Cribs and Mystery Jets.”Speaking of the original dark fruit pioneer, perhaps no cider brand has hit the millennial nail on the head like Strongbow this year. As well as officially sponsoring three music festivals, the brand is currently working on its pilot TV Show ‘Re-Freshers Week, presented by Strongbow’ set to launch on MTV in September, and has paired up with social media entertainment company LadBible for Dark Fruit’s first individual above the line campaign. “We’re lucky enough to have some extremely dedicated fans, who have gone as far as to create Dark Fruit ice cream and even get tattoos based on the brand,” says Lancaster. “With the help of LadBible, we’ll be bringing a campaign inspired by their acts of appreciation to a town near you soon.”White cider brands may have a long way to go before millennials start getting their logos inked on their skin, but they may just be able to learn some lessons from fruity cider. Otherwise the likes of Frosty Jack’s are likely to be left out in the cold.Creative Challengeno nameoriginaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 705width 940orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (originaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 705width 940orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (originaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 705width 940orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (originaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 705width 940orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (originaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 705width 940orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (originaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 705width 940orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC ( White cider isn’t the only alcohol with an image problem. Having long been seen as fattening, beer is often a ‘no-no’ for the health-conscious drinker. Yet in much the same way that a small glass of red wine can provide beneficial antioxidants, studies have linked moderate beer consumption with a decreased risk of heart disease and even stronger bones. We challenged brand design agency PB Creative to come up with a beer for the health-conscious drinker. Here’s what they came up with. “For too long, beer has been associated with football louts and protruding bellies,” says creative director Lloyd Moffat. Enter Hop Heart, the premium lager that’s good for your heart.“Hop Heart is all about changing the perceptions of beer and highlighting its health benefits,” explains Moffat. “Not many people realise that beer is fundamentally made from just four natural ingredients, and contains high levels of vitamin B6, which helps decrease the risk of heart disease.”The three-strong range, supported through a multi-channel campaign including social media, healthy living and lifestyle magazines, is available in Copper, Golden and Green hop ale variants (abv 4%).“We wanted the brand to be simple and effective in its delivery of communication,” says Moffat. “The hop/heart icon was born from the desire to sum up the health benefits of the product within a single icon, and plays on the ‘I heart NY’ strapline. It’s clear to anyone looking at a Hop Heart can that it’s made using the finest natural ingredients, and that it’s good for your heart.”With an rsp of £5.99 per six-pack, the range is aimed “primarily at those seeking a healthier lifestyle who don’t mind spending a little more on products that are naturally good for them,” continues Moffat. As well as reinforcing the message that “everything is good in moderation”, Hop Heart’s 330ml recyclable can format also delivers the “metallic finish required for a premium lager”.The latest cider innovationsHere’s a quick look at the latest cider launches hoping to quench Brit’s thirst for health, craft and premium drinks. Angioletti RiservaLaunched: May 2018The self-proclaimed ‘only real Italian cider in the UK’ hit the shelves of more than 400 Morrisons stores back in May, hoping to entice cider shoppers looking to trade up on their standard tipple. Made using 100% Italian apples, the 6.8% premium craft cider is produced and bottled in Trentino (rsp: £2/500ml), and follows the brand’s Angioletti Secco, which launched in Tesco a month before.last_img read more

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Hamptons style well suited to the Gold Coast

first_img30 Michel Drive, Currumbin Waters.A HUGE crowd flocked to the first inspection of a new Hamptons build on the Gold Coast on the weekend.“We were absolutely inundated with people,” Katrina Walsh of Harcourts Coastal said.“We had over 30 inspections in half an hour with multiple inquiries on realestate.com.au and plenty of phone inquiries.” 30 Michel Drive, Currumbin Waters. 30 Michel Drive, Currumbin Waters.Ms Walsh said the Hamptons style was the drawcard for 30 Michel Drive.“The two builders helped me as the real estate agent by doing an exceptional quality build,” she said.“I had no negative comments on the weekend, everyone was just blown away by the home.”She said the Hamptons look was a style that had been embraced by Australians.“I just think generally people like to decorate in a Hamptons fashion,” she said.“It’s beachy and relaxed and it’s what people want — it really suits the Gold Coast lifestyle.“Whether you’re a teenager or you’re 100, everyone seems to really love that style of home.Ms Walsh said there wasn’t enough of these types of homes on the Gold Coast to meet demand. 30 Michel Drive, Currumbin Waters. 30 Michel Drive, Currumbin Waters.The four-bedroom freestanding villa at 30 Michel Drive, Currumbin Waters features open-plan living and dining areas and a covered outdoor deck overlooking a pool.The home has been styled to channel a modern Hamptons look with high ceilings, wooden floors, plantation shutters and pendant lights.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North6 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agolast_img read more

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Become an instant landlord

first_imgThe complex is located at Palm Beach.The whole complex has been styled with $377,112 worth of furniture and electrical appliances. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:50Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:50 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels1080p1080pHD720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen$5m Gold Coast apartment block00:51FOR the price of a single serve of fish and chips, you could become the instant landlord of an entire Gold Coast unit block, and rake in a potential income of $238,000 a year.And there’s no need for a deposit, you don’t need to organise any conveyancing or even a building and pest inspection and you can move in before Christmas Day with the dining table already set for lunch. It has been styled by Kelly Finnis, interior designer at Noble House Design.RSL Art Union General Manager Tracey Bishop said a ticket in the $5 million Golden Treasure prize was a great Secret Santa gift, although it was also a gift people should buy for themselves.“The Rudland’s Reach apartment complex at Palm Beach, is named in honour of veteran Sergeant Peter Rudland, who served Australia through numerous deployments,” Ms Bishop said.“He sustained multiple injuries in a Black Hawk helicopter crash which claimed the lives of three Australian Commandos and one US soldier.”Tickets are available atrslartunion.com.au or by calling 1300 775 888. How is that for a view!The latest RSL Art Union prize home is a $5 million Gold Coast apartment block, with the winner to be drawn on December 21 — the ultimate early Christmas present.Included in the first prize is six fully furnished units — a four-bedroom, fourth floor penthouse and five luxury apartments, plus all legal fees, the first year’s water and rates costs, a $2000 travel voucher and the registration and on road costs for two Audis — a Q3 Sport and an A3 Cabriolet.center_img RSL Art Union – A $5 million Gold Coast apartment block of six fully furnished units is up for grabs, with the winner drawn on December 21.And it could all be yours for just $10.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours agoInside one of the apartments — and that view!Located just 200m from the beach, facilities include a communal pool and BBQ area, lift access to every floor with ducted airconditioning throughout, a secure garage with 12 car spaces, plus two public visitor spaces. And it could be yours for Christmas.Each ticket sold in the RSL Art Union goes toward providing aid to veterans from recent conflicts, as well as those on the long journey to recovery from past deployments, in the form counselling, financial support, accommodation, rehabilitation and much more.last_img read more

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