Living near foreclosed homes may raise risk of being overweight

first_img Read Full Story People who live near foreclosed homes may be at greater risk of being overweight than those who don’t have such homes in their immediate neighborhoods, according to a new study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers.The study was published online July 18, 2013 in the American Journal of Public Health and will appear in the September 2013 print edition.“Millions of homes went into foreclosure during the Great Recession, and housing markets in many areas of the country are still struggling to recover. People living next door to foreclosed properties have been hit hard by the housing crisis; their homes may have lost value, and blighted houses on the block make many people feel less safe,” said lead author Mariana Arcaya, SD ’13, research scientist in the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. “While our study wasn’t designed to pinpoint the mechanisms by which foreclosures put neighbors at risk of weight gain, previous research tells us that eating and drinking more are common reactions to stress, and that dangerous blocks may discourage physical activity.”Arcaya and her colleagues analyzed housing and medical data from 2,078 study participants in Massachusetts from 1987-2008. They looked at foreclosure records as well as participants’ proximity to foreclosed homes and their body mass index (BMI) levels. They found that living within 100 meters of a foreclosed home significantly increased the likelihood of having a higher BMI. Living near foreclosed homes was also associated with higher odds of being overweight.last_img read more

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On-the-job excellence

first_imgExcellence. Impact. Ingenuity. Grit.Those were among the watchwords at the annual Harvard Heroes celebration, held Monday at Sanders Theatre. Hundreds of staff members packed the benches and the balcony to applaud 63 colleagues who were honored for their strong commitment to a job well done, and to listen to remarks from President Drew Faust and Executive Vice President Katie Lapp.“You work to make Harvard better tomorrow than it is today,” Faust told the group, in which every School and department at the University was represented. She spoke about each of the honorees, who ranged from IT professionals and research administrators to Eudeen Green, the longtime custodial crew chief of William James Hall, and Dan Twomey, a sergeant with the Harvard University Police Department.The group filed in to Sanders to raucous cheers and Fatboy Slim’s “Praise You.” Lapp and Faust passed the mic back and forth in saluting this year’s Heroes, who have spearheaded special projects, advised students, and pulled off complicated events with good grace.Three staff members were spotlighted as “Green Heroes” for their efforts linked to sustainability: Meredith Abrams, senior guest services manager for executive education at Harvard Business School; Jane Finn-Foley, student services coordinator at Harvard Kennedy School; and Michael Macrae, senior environmental and greenhouse gas officer in Campus Services.The ceremony ended with videos showcasing the Heroes’ favorite memories working at Harvard, tales of their strangest days on the job, and, on a humorous note, a list of the most overused acronyms and phrases at the University.“Your best work is often taken for granted,” Faust said when recognizing Valerie Nelson, associate director for environmental public health in campus services. It was a remark suited for the whole group, at a ceremony from which they departed a little less unsung.last_img read more

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Meat Meet.

first_imgMicrobiology of sanitation.Costs of spoilage.Danger of food-borne hazards and emerging pathogens.Roles of engineering, plant layout, construction materials, refrigeration and ventilation. Food safety is on shoppers’ minds more than ever. So the American Meat Science Association has scheduled a training for meat and poultry processors Nov. 29-30 in Athens, Ga.”Improving Your Sanitation Program” will begin at 7:45 a.m. Nov. 29 at the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. It will offer two full days of timely classes in a comprehensive course developed with help from University of Georgia and Virginia Tech food scientists. To process food products of the highest quality possible, the course will address the:center_img A $395 fee covers materials, luncheons, a reception and refreshment breaks. To learn more, contact your UGA Extension Service county office. Or call Estes Reynolds at (706) 542-2574 or Norman Marriott at (540) 231-7640.last_img read more

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Best Rivers in the Southeast Poll

first_imgClass V[poll id=”40″] Class IV[poll id=”39″] Class II[poll id=”37″] Class III[poll id=”38″] The Southeast and mid-Atlantic is teeming with navigable waterways. Everywhere you turn there is another blue line snaking through the landscape, providing the region with some of the best whitewater and flat water paddling in the country, if not the world. We truly live in a paddling paradise.In our June paddling issue we picked our favorite rivers in the Southeast and broke them down by difficulty in our Head of the Class: 50 of the Best Rivers in the Southeast feature. We are proud of our selections but would love to know what you think.Is your home water the best place to paddle? Does one river hold a special place in your heart?Vote for your favorite river below. If your river didn’t make the list, leave a comment and let us know why you think it should be the top dog.Best Rivers in the SoutheastClass I[poll id=”36″]last_img read more

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Brazil Prepares for Cyber War

first_imgBy Dialogo December 14, 2011 “Brazil has an advantage in terms of law enforcement because our constitution prohibits anonymity. Therefore the identification of the owner of any domain is mandatory,” Scartezini said. The ideal would be to have international security legislation regulating all contracts with Internet providers and the sellers of domain names, “in order for the basis of the Internet to become more secure,” she said. Scartezini said three components are essential to any cyber security policy. First, there should be international umbrella agreements that form the basis for establishment of country-specific legislation. Secondly, the policy needs an agreement that links registries, registrars, Internet service providers (ISPs) and domain name sellers. This would be based on a single code of conduct with penalties applicable by all countries for violations. Lastly, broader educational campaigns should be implemented to protect young people from possible online dangers. Scartezini is not along on the demand for a more global focus. “I strongly believe that as cyber is a global problem, it will require a global approach,” said William Beer, director of OneSecurity at PricewaterhouseCoopers. “Individual nations must not limit their focus to their own borders.” Securing the nation’s data SERPRO President Marcos Mazoni stressed the importance of information security for Brazil. “People, businesses, all need to feel secure. The data that travels on our network and that of our clients is protected. We have created the conditions to provide and guarantee that security,” he said, recalling the attacks on SERPRO’s network a few months ago. “They said they got information from our network, but we proved it was not true. It was all public information, such as my email, for instance.” The only thing that no security system can fully avoid is the mischief of professionals with access to information, he said. SERPRO has a partnership with the National Airport Authority to help with large events, starting with the Rio+20 Earth Summit next June. This will be a key test of the agency’s security. “We will have several heads of state circulating through Rio de Janeiro. Our mission is to guarantee the cyber security of this event,” Mazoni said. “It is important that everybody know that security is not just a government matter, but a matter that should be debated by society as a whole.” Cyber security now a defense issue Since cyber-attacks have reached the level of national security threats, countries increasingly treat the protection of cyber space as a defense matter. The Brazilian Armed Forces are indeed playing a leading role. “The need for preparation and technological knowledge imposes itself, but the military is not part of law enforcement,” said ICANN’s Scartezini. “Their readiness in cyber security is a function of a broader defense need, the defense of the state.” Law enforcement agents have to be technologically well-equipped and trained and should act in concert with all other agencies in seeking a global policy of security for the net, Scartezini said. Others, like PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Beer, said that the traditional approach to cyber security is simply not working and cannot keep up with the quantity, pace of change and complexities of cyber-attacks. “A military mindset and approach can offer a more robust and focused manner to address the problem,” said Beer. “However, private-sector clients and the military are not used to working together and there is skepticism about collaborating from both groups.” The Brazilian government’s invitation to the military and private sector to sit down to discuss the risks and potential solutions to cyber security is a step towards erasing some of that skepticism, which Beer says “is due to their different mentality and drivers, such as command and control vs. profit.” Dos Santos, head of command at CDCiber, said multiple collaborations already exist between private industry and the government, and specifically the military on information technology, for instance, data and trend analysis. “I think that, as the lines between our personal lives and professional lives become blurred due to consumerization and social media, a military approach will only work in large enterprises and behind the scenes in the data centers,” Beer said. “It is not suited for dealing with how you and I use the Internet for personal reasons.” The limits of censorship While it may be tempting, censorship is not the way to secure the Internet and reduce the virtual attacks, said Scartezini, who’s also a professor at the University of São Paulo. It would also stifle innovation by users, which has been the reason for the Internet’s success, she said, noting that “any action that restricts the Internet constitutes a direct attack on the capacity for innovation that it brings to the world.” Scartezini puts stock in the importance of public awareness, in particular for youth. For her, meetings such as the Cyber Security International Forum promote a needed debate about Internet security and collaboration. Since 2009, Brazilian law enforcement agencies have lobbied hard for international monitoring and capture of those who commit crimes via the Internet, particularly child pornography and human trafficking. But to be successful, she said, there must be an agreement to share information about domain names and ISPs. All this data needs to be preserved for investigation for a set period of time, with access to the data bank as well as continuous information exchange about sites associated with crimes such as pedophilia. That would prevent the selling of new domain names to individuals wanted by any law enforcement agency for Internet crimes, she said. “The best approach is to negotiate individual agreements and incorporate them in a structure that maintains an internal logic, so that in time we will have a complete, international legislation on the topic,” Scartezini said. The Brazilian government wants to revolutionize cyber security by readying the country’s military, law enforcement agencies and private sector for collaborative, preventive work. In late November, security specialists gathered in Rio de Janeiro for a two-day Cyber Security International Forum that attracted top military officials, federal and state police, data processing entities, the Committee for Information Security, the Cyber Defense Center and the Presidential Institutional Security Cabinet (GSI), as well as private consultants and IT firms. Maj. Brig. Álvaro Knupp, a director in the Defense Ministry, emphasized that cyber security and cyber defense are indeed a matter for society as a whole. “At the end of the day, in a war many more civilians die than soldiers,” he said. The forum — organized by the Federal Service of Data Processing (SERPRO) — took place at Rio’s Windsor Atlântica Hotel and focused on the development of a national cyber security policy, known in Brazilian IT circles as the White Book. An initial step toward such a consolidated strategy was the Army’s recent launch of the Cyber Defense Center (CDCiber) to protect its communications networks. “The Center is a step in the development of doctrines for the coordination of cyber security among all the branches of the Armed Forces and with other sectors of society,” said Army Lt. Gen. José Carlos dos Santos, commander of CDCiber. Brazil constitution prohibits anonymity In 2010, the GSI published its so-called Green Book of Brazil’s Cyber Security, intended as a conversation-starter to define the parameters of a collaborative national policy. “National policies for any country are not the solution to the problems of Internet security that we all face,” said Vanda Scartezini, chair of the nominating committee of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), and one of the forum’s speakers. The Green Book calls “to develop, cultivate and broaden a culture of cyber security in Brazil is a long-term and far-reaching challenge that merits prioritization and a joint effort in the building of consensus and premises and directives for the White Book.” Specifically, a national cyber security policy includes symmetric cryptography, asymmetric techniques, security protocols, techniques for secure implementation, high-performance data processing, computation and quantum cryptography, project management and collaborative infrastructure, and human resources development. last_img read more

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Radioactive Material Detectors Tested on Brazilian Borders

first_imgBy Dialogo October 26, 2012 During the last two weeks, the Brazilian Armed Forces carried out an operation on the borders with Peru and Bolivia to test new radioactive material detectors, in addition to the brand new unmanned air vehicles, the Ministry of Defense reported on October 24. Early this week, Operation Ágata 6 came to an end after seizing 3.7 tons of drugs, as well as 67 vehicles and 201 ships, said the Ministry in a statement. The Chemical, Biological, and Nuclear Defense Platoon participated in the operation that patrolled the rivers of Pantanal, a huge biodiversity rich marshland in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul (center-west), Brazil. “The goal was to test new radioactive material detection equipment in vessels operating in the region,” informed the Ministry. “The control of this kind of crime is essential to public safety and nature. In case of contamination, biodiversity can cause damage and infect people,” stated Lieutenant Mauricio Ribeiro de Paiva Júnior. The Military personnel informed that a harmful substance was detected. During the operation, the brand new unmanned air vehicles were also used for the first time, the Ministry told AFP. Both unmanned air vehicles, manufactured in Israel, will be used for surveillance activities on Brazilian borders. Operation Ágata is part of the strategic plan launched by Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff in June 2011. It aims at the periodic mobilization of border Military contingents supported by armored vehicles, planes and boats, in order to bust traffickers. About 17,000 Military members participated in Operation Ágata 5 on the border area of Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina and Uruguay, an area that encompasses 10,107 kilometers. The operation came to an end in August. In 15 days, the troops detained 31 people and seized six tons of drugs, according to the Ministry of Defense. Brazil shares a border of about 25,750 kilometers, of which about 14,500 kilometers are basin territories with Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Surinam, Uruguay, Venezuela, and French Guiana.last_img read more

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4 benefits of employee recognition

first_img 136SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details Sure, recognizing employees will make them feel good, but is that the only reason to praise your staff? If you need more reasons to recognize your employees, here are 4 more benefits to consider.Recognition increases performance: An employee is more likely to work hard and be more invested in their work when they feel that their performance is appreciated. They’re also more likely to enjoy their jobs, and we all know a happy employee is a productive employee.Recognition strengthens teams: By recognizing your employees, you’re providing a positive environment where your employees can gain confidence in themselves. When an employee has confidence, they become more engaged, and an engaged staff will be an innovative team that enjoys coming to work every day.Recognition creates retention: You have a great team, you’ll want them to stick around. Employees want to be in a place where they feel valued. By showing your team their value, and recognizing their hard work, you’ll see turnover rates plummet and you’ll save lots of money on having to hire and train new staff.Recognition improves reputation: Happy employees will have better relationships with your clients. Good relationships will lead to good reputations, and those good reputations will bring about more customers and give you an edge when it comes to competing for new talent.last_img read more

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BOCES Summer Youth Employment Program helps non-profits

first_img“It’s for kids who are in a certain economic bracket to get jobs to work over the summer,” said BOCES Center for Career and Technical Excellence Principal Matt Sheehan. Three additional beds are being built for sensory gardens, filled with materials like sand and stones. At the center, teens are building six garden beds for students and staff to grow produce in the fall. “A lot of the kids who end up in this school are not coming from a rural setup; they’re coming more from an urban. So them seeing that is important and then being able to do it, it’s attainable,” said Sheehan. “The most important part of this is not so much giving them jobs, but teaching them how to get jobs. That concept of what a job is, learning work skills and readiness skills, and how to apply,” said Sheehan. APALACHIN (WBNG) — Teens in the Broome-Tioga BOCES Summer Youth Employment Program are finishing up work Thursday. “We’ve been making picnic tables, and we were working on power tools and making the garden beds. And we were working on birdhouses,” said Union-Endicott student Dominic Rose, who is involved in the program. The program hires teens between the two counties, placing them at different non-profits around the area to help complete projects. On average, 250 kids join the Summer Youth Employment Program, but due to the pandemic, this year 140 teens are participating. One of the sites this summer is the BOCES West Learning Center in Apalachin. The program is a partnership between Broome-Tioga BOCES and DSS.last_img read more

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Allied lands last piece of £300m Manchester scheme

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Kadin Jakarta donates basic medical supplies for battle against COVID-19

first_imgThe capital reported 83 new infections on Friday, raising the number of COVID-19 cases to 598 in total. Fifty-one people have died from the disease in the city so far.Amid the outbreak of the fast-spreading virus, health workers need more and more healthcare supplies, especially protective gear. Donations, therefore, were badly needed, especially for health workers staying at city-owned hotels, said the president director of city-owned hotel manager PT Jakarta Tourisindo’s (Jaktour), Novita Dewi.Read also: Ministry plans to use hotels to house medical workersJakarta Governor Anies Baswedan issued a policy on Thursday to provide a place for doctors and nurses to live while handling COVID-19 cases in hospitals.The administration provided 220 rooms with 414 beds at the Grand Cempaka Business hotel – one of the properties managed by Jaktour – in Central Jakarta’s Cempaka Putih district. More than 300 medical workers are currently put up at the hotel.Novita said the company, which manages several hotels across the capital, had also provided accommodation for 157 medical workers at D’Arcici Alhijra Hotel in the same district.Novita said Jaktour was preparing another hotel, D’Arcici Plumpang in Koja district of North Jakarta, to host health workers from the Tarakan Regional General Hospital in Gambir district, Central Jakarta and Duren Sawit Hospital in Duren Sawit district, East Jakarta.”We definitely need these donations to serve the medical workers staying at our hotels,” Dewi said as she thanked Kadin Jakarta’s for the donation. (dfr)Topics : Read also: Santini Group, Pakarti Yoga Group donate Rp 10b to PMI in battle against COVID-19″We were touched by the governor’s concern about health workers,” Kadin Jakarta chairwoman Diana Dewi said at City Hall on Friday. “Today, we are participating to ease the Jakarta administration’s heavy burden. We hope this can be good charity from all of us.”Jakarta, being the country’s epicenter of the outbreak, has continued to see more medical workers contract the contagious respiratory disease amid reports of a lack of adequate protective gear and supplies.As of Thursday, 50 workers from 24 hospitals across the city had tested positive for the disease and two had died, said the Jakarta administration’s assistant for public welfare, Catur Laswanto. The Jakarta branch of the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Kadin) has donated thousands of items to meet the basic needs of medical workers standing on the front line in the battle against the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19).The donation includes thousands of liters of liquid hand sanitizer, 750 pairs of rubber gloves, 2.5 tons of rice, 500 packs of tinned cake, wheat flour and cooking oil as well as 12 disinfection chambers.Kadin Jakarta handed the assistance over to the Jakarta administration, which will distribute the goods to health workers currently staying at city-owned hotels.last_img read more

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