Senior Director of Maintenance and Operations

first_imgThorough knowledge as required to lead and oversee a largefacilities maintenance organization, including but not limited to:interior and exterior building systems, interior and exteriorutility systems and infrastructure including power generation,facility automation, access control, and energy management systems,exterior hardscape and landscape infrastructure, custodialmaintenance, fleet operation and management, and refuse andrecycling.Strong knowledge of engineering requirements and programsrelated to facilities operation, utility design and constructionincluding an ability to troubleshoot and creatively resolveunanticipated challenges which may arise.Strong knowledge of maintenance and repair project planning andmanagement principles including skills which result in successfulproject performance related to scope identification, budget andschedule performance, and quality control.Demonstrated record of successful financial planning,budgeting, and fiscal management including the ability to managemulti-functional and diverse programs of significant budgetaryimpact.Demonstrated experience developing and implementing a strongcustomer service approach to work efforts while motivating staff ina challenging environment.Extensive knowledge of personnel management includinginteracting effectively with many levels of personnel, providingsound analysis and guidance to supervisory staff concerningdisciplinary actions and employee/labor relations issues,performance management, dispute resolution, and teamdevelopment.Demonstrated knowledge and understanding of public contractingrequirement and skills required to develop and analyze proposalsand negotiate favorable business terms.Ability to effectively interpret, organize and presentinformation, ideas and concepts in written or presentation formatand use consultative, collaborative and facilitation skills toobtain decisions required to move forward towardimplementation. CompensationClassification: Administrator IIIHiring Range: Commensurate with experienceSan José State University offers employees a comprehensive benefitspackage typically worth 30-35% of your base salary. For moreinformation on programs available, please see the Employee Benefits Summary .Application ProcedureClick Apply Now to complete the SJSU Online Employment Applicationand attach the following documents: Knowledge, Skills & Abilities Job SummaryThe Senior Director of Maintenance & Operations is responsiblefor the leadership, administration, management, and supervisoryoversight of all services and functions of the Maintenance &Operations unit within Facilities Development & Operations. Theunit provides for the operation and maintenance of campus buildingsand utility systems as well as supportive operational functionsincluding fleet management, grounds, custodial, and movingservices.As part of this role, the Senior Director oversees and administersan assigned budget as well as the campus maintenance management andfacilities condition assessment systems while playing a pivotalrole in the development and execution of priorities as related toensuring ongoing continuity of operations. This includesestablishing strong relationships with campus clientele and drivingforward a University first and customer focused approach to allwork efforts. Additionally, the Senior Director leads effortsrelated to planning and overseeing deferred and major maintenanceprojects while advancing carbon neutrality goals and ensuring aresilient campus infrastructure. The Senior Director has directresponsibility to implement agreements with campus entities asrelated to the provision of maintenance and operation services. TheSenior Director also participates with other senior managers todevelop, establish, and implement Department strategic andoperational plans and initiatives.The Maintenance & Operations unit of Facilities Development& Operations provides services to a University campus spreadacross five sites comprised of +170 acres, 52 buildings, and morethan six million gross square feet. Maintenance & Operationsemployees approximately 250 full time permanent staff and up to anadditional nine part time, seasonal, or contract staff.This is a position in the CSU – Management Personnel Plan (MPP),and serves at the pleasure of the President. This position willrequire adherence to University compliance training such as:Conflict of Interest and Ethics, AB 1825 Sexual HarassmentPrevention, Information Security, and Injury and Illness PreventionProgram. The person hired for this position may be required tocomplete an outside employment disclosure statement in accordancewith Title V of the California Code of Regulations.Key Responsibilities Preferred Qualifications Required Qualifications All applicants must apply within the specified application period:December 8, 2020 through December 22, 2020 . This positionis open until filled; however, applications received afterscreening has begun will be considered at the discretion of theuniversity.Contact InformationUniversity [email protected] InformationSatisfactory completion of a background check (including a criminalrecords check) is required for employment. SJSU will issue acontingent offer of employment to the selected candidate, which maybe rescinded if the background check reveals disqualifyinginformation, and/or it is discovered that the candidate knowinglywithheld or falsified information. Failure to satisfactorilycomplete the background check may affect the continued employmentof a current CSU employee who was offered the position on acontingent basis.The standard background check includes: criminal check, employmentand education verification. Depending on the position, a motorvehicle and/or credit check may be required. All background checksare conducted through the university’s third party vendor, AccurateBackground. Some positions may also require fingerprinting. SJSUwill pay all costs associated with this procedure. Evidence ofrequired degree(s) or certification(s) will be required at time ofhire.SJSU IS NOT A SPONSORING AGENCY FOR STAFF OR MANAGEMENT POSITIONS.(e.g. H1-B VISAS)All San José State University employees are considered mandatedreporters under the California Child Abuse and Neglect ReportingAct and are required to comply with the requirements set forth inCSU Executive Order 1083 as a condition of employment.Equal Employment StatementSan José State University (SJSU) is an EqualOpportunity/Affirmative Action employer committed tonondiscrimination on the basis of age, ancestry, citizenshipstatus, color, creed, disability, ethnicity, gender, geneticinformation, marital status, medical condition, national origin,race, religion or lack thereof, sex, sexual orientation,transgender, or protected veteran status consistent with applicablefederal and state laws. This policy applies to all SJSU students,faculty and staff programs and activities. Title IX of theEducation Amendments of 1972, and certain other federal and statelaws, prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex in all educationprograms and activities operated by the university (both on and offcampus).center_img Prefer registration as a Professional Engineer in Civil,Mechanical, or Electrical disciplines.Prefer CEFP certification through the Association of PhysicalPlant Administrators and/or CFM certification through theInternational Facilities Management AssociationSupervisory experience within a collective bargaining andrepresented staff environment.Experience planning and implementing deferred maintenance andutility infrastructure projects.Experience in maintenance and operational management of a Statefacility, College or University, or other multi-facilitycomplex. Bachelor’s degree in engineering, facilities management,construction management, business or a related field OR which maybe obtained through equivalent experience such as might be attainedthrough ten years of supervisory experience, of which a minimum offive years is associated with progressively responsible seniorlevel experience.Ten years of supervisory experience and five years of seniorleadership experience within a multi-faceted facilities maintenanceorganization.Demonstrated management experience leading and overseeingtechnical operations and services common to a multi-facetedfacilities maintenance organization including resourceplanning. ResumeLetter of InterestOther Provides management and oversight for all maintenance andoperational services including the following functions: carpentry,plumbing, lock, painting, electrical, and HVAC/building controlsystem services, central plant and utility services, automotiveservices, grounds services, custodial services, refuse andrecycling services, and moving services.Leads and oversees implementation of a maintenance managementsystem to assign, track, prioritize, plan, schedule, and managedeployment of resources required to implement service plans,properly steward physical assets, and maintain responsiveness tocampus needs. This includes development and management of apreventative maintenance program designed to ensure lifecycleachievement for all physical assets.Leads, oversees, and ensures development of work processes tosupport a fully coordinated completion of routine and emergencymaintenance needs, and customer service calls and work requestsbased on a prioritized deployment model including standards forcustomer engagement.Integrate and direct the efforts and results of Managers,Supervisors, staff and contractors engaged in the generalmaintenance and repair of University buildings, utilitiesdistribution and monitoring systems, and related infrastructure aswell as those services related to grounds, automotive, custodial,refuse/recycling, and moving.Directly responsible for development of capital renewal,deferred maintenance, and major maintenance multi-year plans usingan evidence-driven planning processes, strategies to maximizeresources, and an approach ensuring timely and cost-effectiveimplementation.Oversees development and implementation of comprehensivepolicies, procedures and performance standards associated withoperational units and functional responsibilities.Directly responsible for the astute management of assignedbudgets and resources including monitoring, tracking, analysis, andforecasting efforts necessary for successful performance.Oversees personnel management and administration for over 250employees including hiring, retention, performance, correctiveand/or disciplinary action, and resolution of issues while workingclosely with the Business & Administrative Services unit andUniversity Personnel. Advertised: December 08, 2020 (9:00 AM) Pacific StandardTimeApplications close:last_img read more

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Spring Block Party Draws More Than 50,000 to OC

first_img“Had so much fun I think we’ll come back in the Fall,” one of the vendors said.Ocean City firefighter Ryan Stamm and son John sell OCFD t-shirts at the block party as Lou Prange of Bear, Delaware checks out the wares. Hank Eckbold (far right) looks on as shoppers peruse his fabricated metal creationsAsbury Avenue was transformed into a giant shopping mall, gourmet open air restaurant and town-wide gathering place on Saturday with another successful edition of the Annual Spring Block Party.Beautiful sunny weather –contrary to some earlier forecasts–helped swell attendance, which Chamber of Commerce organizers estimated to more than 50,000 people. From 5th through14th Streets, they enjoyed products, services and food items offered by more than 350 vendors.  But mostly, they enjoyed putting winter behind and being in Ocean City.“We always come to the Block Party,” said Walead Abdrabouh of Galloway Township, who enjoyed the festivities with wife Kelly and daughters Ava, 5, and Emma, 3. “It’s a great event.”“I got a red balloon!” a smiling Emma chimed in.Walead Abdraboug, wife Kelly and daughters Ava, 5 and Emma 3 all of Galloway The vendors, generally doing brisk business, seemed equally impressed.“This is our third year,” said Hank Eckbold , an Ocean City firefighter whose fabricated metal decorative items seemed to be a big hit. “We were praying for good weather and we got it.” His son John showed off one of his personal creations, a whimsical dog fashioned with repurposed hammer head for a head, nuts for eyes, spring for a body and horseshoes for legs. “Sometimes I don’t know what I’m going to end up with,” John said of his artistry.  “People ask me what I’m making and I say come back in a John Eckbold week and it will be something.”John Eckbold shows off his decorative dog fashioned from re-purposed metal componentsMichele Gillian, Executive Director of the Ocean City Chamber of Commerce praised the efforts of Rose Savastano who coordinates the setup and relations with the hundreds of vendors. “Rose and her team do an excellent job of getting everyone set up and ensuring that we have a good mix of different types of vendors. Rose knows all of the vendors personally, and their family members. It all starts at 5:30 a.m. and it is extremely well-organized.”She also had kind words for the City of Ocean City, particularly the Public Works department, which ensured the streets were clean and aided in setup.Everything was ready to go in advance of the announced 9 a.m. starting time, when hundreds of savvy earlybirds were already shopping in force.The Chamber, which also runs the hugely popular Fall Block Party, was represented by dozens of local member organizations maintaining a presence along the route, handing out pens, beach balls, tote bags, candy and other goodies.“The Block Parties have become extremely popular, awesomely big events. Between the Spring and Fall events, they are a fulltime job to run,” Gillian said.In addition to the vendors in tents and tables on the street, many of the Asbury Avenue merchants had their own tables set up on the sidewalks in front of their businesses.And then there was the food! Burgers, freshly grilled seafood, pizza, soup, popcorn and just about any other snack or meal could be found along the event route.  Many visitors juggled shopping bags and full plates of food as they walked along the avenue.  Others dined outdoors at tables set up outside of Jon and Patty’s, Arlene, Yianni’s and other eateries.As morning gave way to the afternoon, the crowd at its peak and parking spots near the event were at a premium. One man in a pickup truck, “Just call me Fred” squeezed into a spot near Fifth and Central. “Got lucky this year!” he said.Crowds slowly began to thin in the mid-afternoon but were still healthy right up until the 4 p.m. closing time.last_img read more

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The Drunken Hearts’ Andrew McConathy Talks YarmonyGrass & Upcoming Show With Victor Wooten Trio

first_imgColorado has a lot of truly hard working bands these days, as it has become a mecca for many musicians from various genres to live and be inspired to create. The Drunken Hearts are certainly one of those bands. With an increasingly heavy tour schedule, and the ongoing preparations to release new music, the band has a whole lot going on.We had the chance to catch up with lead singer and guitarist Andrew McConathy, who also is the force behind CO’s YarmonyGrass Festival, to discuss new music and direction for the Hearts in 2017, the band’s upcoming tour schedule, including a show with Victor Wooten and members of Leftover Salmon at Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom on March 24th (more info), and the 12th annual edition of YarmonyGrass.Live For Live Music: YarmonyGrass just announced its initial lineup, with headliners yet to be announced. Can you tell us what we can expect this year?Andrew McConathy: 2017 marks twelve years of YarmonyGrass and we have all sorts of surprises planned as far as the lineup goes. Announced already is Todd Snider backed by Great American Taxi, Head for the Hills, The Drunken Hearts, The Grant Farm featuring Andy Thorn from Leftover Salmon, Kitchen Dwellers, Coral Creek, Bonfire Dub, Jay Roemer Band featuring Dave Carroll from Trampled by Turtles, and many more. We have another act being announced on June 22 followed by our Headliners Announcement on Friday, July 14. While I can’t say who they are at this point, I can say they are all Yarmony favorites and our fans will not be disappointed.L4LM: The Drunken Hearts are heading to New York City this week with Brothers Roy (tonight – 3/16 at American Beauty). How often do you make it out to the east coast? Any interesting NYC experiences that you have had in the past?AM: This is our 3rd time playing in New York City since May. We are currently in the midst of a 5 week tour that started in Bellingham, WA and took us to Oregon, California, Nevada, an amazing WinterWonderGrass Festival in Steamboat, CO, Key West, Washington DC, and Pennsylvania. We played in Albany, NY last night and hit NYC, VT, and Connecticut next week before heading home for the big blowout show at Cervantes on March 24 with a stellar lineup of acts.A lot of interesting things have happened to us in NYC but one experience that comes to mind is our drummer, Alex Johnson, riding a carousel horse outside a bar after playing the Brooklyn Bowl. But like most things The Drunken Hearts find amusing, you probably had to be there.L4LM: You came out with Love & Thirst this past year, tell us a little about the album. Any new music coming out in 2017?AM: Love & Thirst took almost 3 years to record so we’re very happy that one is out and we’re all very proud of the sounds on that record. It was produced by Grammy winner Rob Eaton from Dark Star Orchestra who recorded Jimmy Buffett, Madonna, Pat Metheny, etc. so we were really lucky to get to work with him in the studio.We do have a new EP that we are putting the final touches on at Silo Sound in Denver with the talented Todd Divel. It’s called The Prize. All of the songs have a really unique feel to them and it’s a nice change of pace from Love & Thirst. While Love & Thirst was more of a step towards Southern Rock ‘n Roll, the songs on The Prize fall closer to an Americana vein, in that they all have their own identity and emotion. As a result, we are really trying to make those differences shine and stand out – even if it means not having full band instrumentation represented on each track, which I find very cool. We released the first single, “Tear My Heart Out” a few weeks ago and the rest will be out in a few months or so.L4LM: Soooo….The Drunken Hearted Medicine Show w/ Victor Wooten Trio, Drew & Andy Duo, Band of Heathens, Brad Parsons Band, Coral Creek at Cervantes on Friday, March 24th. That’s a killer lineup!AM: To say we were excited to help curate such a cool event is a huge understatement. I definitely have to hand it to Scott Morrill of Cervantes for connecting all the dots and having the faith in The Drunken Hearts to host such legends like Victor Wooten and Dennis Chambers, plus The Band of Heathens and our friends Drew Emmitt & Andy Thorn from Leftover Salmon. It’s going to be a heater, that’s for sure.Victor Wooten Discusses Music As An Art Of ExpressionL4LM: What are your thoughts about the rest of 2017 for the band?AM: The Drunken Hearts are really hitting our stride, evidenced by our crazy touring schedule. Like most good things in this life it doesn’t come easy – it’s taken a very long time and a lot of patience with each other as well as dedication to the art. We love what we’re doing and we’re doing what we love. That feels pretty good to say.Chris K from The Colorado Sound radio station recently dubbed us “the hardest working band in Colorado.” I’m not sure if that’s true or not because I know a lot of really hardworking and amazing bands from Colorado that deserve that title. But hell, we’ll take it.L4LM: Thanks for the time Andrew! Good luck with everything coming up in the near future.The Drunken Hearted Medicine Show with The Drunken Hearts, Victor Wooten Trio, Drew Emmitt & Andy Thorn Duo, Band of Heathens, and more is at Denver’s Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom on Friday, March 24th (purchase tickets here). YarmonyGrass will take place from August 10th-13th at Rancho Del Rio, CO with headliners still to be announced. For more information on that, check out the festival website.The Drunken Hearts Tour Dates:Mar 16 / American Beauty / New York, NYMar 17 / Nectar’s / Burlington, VTMar 18 / Bryac / Bridgeport, CTMar 19 / Bryac / Bridgeport, CTMar 24 / Cervantes’ Ballroom / Denver, CO *w/ Victor Wooten, BoHMar 25 / Hodi’s Half Note / Ft. Collins, CO *w/ Band of HeathensApr 13 / Founder’s Brewing / Grand Rapids, MIApr 14 / Tonic Room / Chicago, ILApr 15 / Scarlet & Grey / Columbus, OHApr 18 / ACME / Nashville, TNApr 21 / Last Concert Cafe / Houston, TXApr 22 / Lambert’s / Austin, TXApr 28 / Boulder Theater / Boulder, CO *w/ Bros. ComatoseMay 26 / Gold Room / Colorado Springs, COMay 27 / Paddlefest / Buena Vista, COMay 28 / Wind Rider Festival / Alto, NMMay 29 / Taos Mesa Brewing Co. / Taos, NMJul 20-23 / Floyd Fest / Floyd, VAAug 11-12 / YarmonyGrass / Rancho del Rio, COSept 1 / Four Corners Folk Festival / Pagosa Springs, COlast_img read more

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Neil Patrick Harris is Man of Year

first_imgHasty Pudding Theatricals, the oldest theatrical organization in the United States, has named Emmy Award-winning actor Neil Patrick Harris its 2014 Man of the Year. Harris joins Dame Helen Mirren, who was named Woman of the Year last week.The awards are presented annually to performers who have made lasting and impressive contributions to the world of entertainment. Established in 1951, the Woman of the Year Award has been given to many talented entertainers, including Katharine Hepburn, Jodie Foster, Elizabeth Taylor, and Meryl Streep. Past winners of the Man of the Year Award include Tom Cruise, Anthony Hopkins, Steven Spielberg, and Justin Timberlake.The Man of the Year festivities will take place Feb. 7. Hasty Pudding Theatricals will host a celebratory roast for Harris and present him with his Pudding Pot at Farkas Hall, Hasty Pudding’s home since 1888. Following the roast, Hasty will present the opening-night performance of its 166th production, “Victorian Secrets.”“I assume this is for that pudding-wrestling competition I won last April … right?” said Harris. “It was dark and seemed quite seedy at the time — I’m stoked that it’s connected with Harvard. Fancy! Can’t wait!”“We are pleased to present Mr. Harris with our Man of the Year Award honoring his distinguished contributions to the arts and entertainment industry,” said Tony Oblen ’14, president of Hasty Pudding Theatricals. “With his enviable reputation as a host and showman, we look forward to hosting Mr. Harris for an entertaining and unforgettable evening to recognize his achievements.”Equally successful on stage and screen, Harris currently stars as Barney Stinson in the CBS television series “How I Met Your Mother,” a role that has garnered him multiple Emmy and Golden Globe award nominations. He is a four-time Emmy Award winner for his guest-starring role on “Glee” and as host of the 63rd, 65th, and 66th Tony Awards. In addition to his numerous film and television credits, Harris has enjoyed success in the theater. He will make his return to Broadway in this spring in a production of John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask’s 1998 musical, “Hedwig and the Angry Inch.”Adapted from a Hasty Pudding Theatricals press release.last_img read more

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Alumna kicks off Love Your Body Week at SMC

first_imgTo mark the beginning of Love Your Body Week (LYBW) at Saint Mary’s, Whitney Werner, creator of the BeYOUtiful self-esteem program, talked about body image Monday in Vander Vennet Theatre in the Student Center. “If a person has one other person in their life to trust and be there for them, that can save them,” Werner said. “It is in small groups and small moments that big things can happen. The moments that you have with individual people can impact a person’s life.” Werner, a 2010 alumna of the College, developed BeYOUtiful three years ago to promote confidence in middle-school girls in South Bend. The program allows the girls to interact in a discussion format in which leaders guide the conversations. Sophomore Samantha Moorhead, co-chair of LYBW, said she thought Werner had a great story to tell Saint Mary’s. “Seeing the impact the program can have on those girls is so important for such a vulnerable age group,” Moorhead said. “Learning about how I can help and sharing with Saint Mary’s girls how they can help is important, [Werner] has such a powerful story that translates over to why she is so passionate about it.” Werner recounted her own experiences with bullying and self-harm. “Many of our physical issues we hate about our bodies make us look to fix our internal problems by trying to ‘fix’ external features,” Werner said. “Healing starts with us. … We can only take people as far as we have been willing to go with ourselves. By being willing to take care of ourselves, we become more empowered to help others.” Werner said one of the first steps to appreciating one’s body is to love who he or she is on the inside. “When people know they matter, it’s amazing how you can impact their life,” she said. Werner said low self-esteem affects how people treat others. “You have to have pride in things that you do,” she said. Werner suggested writing compliments on the bathroom mirror. “Write the truths you need to hear about yourself and tell yourself that every day,” she said. “Give yourself compliments. It does not have to be seen as an arrogant thing.” Women tend to compare their features to those thought to be ideal, Werner said. This makes women feel like they have failed. “A big part of it is realizing comparing isn’t healthy. I’m me and that’s okay,” Werner said. Junior Katherine Kautz said students at an all-women’s college like Saint Mary’s have a greater chance of comparing themselves to other women. “It stresses the fact that you need to start with respecting and loving yourself first,” Kautz said. Werner said women should focus on growing from the inside, out. “If you work on yourself, it develops beauty from a whole new way and spills onto other people,” she said.last_img read more

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Distracted Driving Prevention Summit

first_imgTwo Bleckley County 4-H members hope to educate their friends and community members about the dangers of distracted driving. Trevor Barker, a high school senior, and high school sophomore Jade Allen will travel to the 2014 Teen Distracted Driving Prevention Summit, hosted by the National Organization for Youth Safety, in Washington, D.C., Oct. 18 to Oct. 20. The two 4-H’ers were chosen from hundreds of national applicants to attend the event.“They were so ecstatic,” said Brandi McGonagill, Bleckley County Extension 4-H agent. “They posted it all over social media.”The Bleckley County 4-H students will be working alongside more than 20 students from across the country to learn how to engage their community and warn fellow teens about the dangers of distracted driving.Any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving is classified as “distracted driving.” Ten percent of all drivers under the age of 20 involved in fatal crashes were distracted at the time of the crash, and this age group has the largest proportion of distracted drivers.“These deaths are preventable,” said National Organizations for Youth Safety CEO Anita Boles in a press release. “Teens are especially prone to distractions. However, peer-to-peer education — led by youth — can save lives.”The upcoming distracted driving summit will feature presentations, educational activities and interactive training. The three-day summit will also feature four different panels: a distracted driving data/research panel, impact panel, parent influence panel and youth voice panel.The panels will focus on answering questions about teen brain development and distractions, how victims impact families and communities, and how affected individuals can inspire change.“It’s a great opportunity for them to go to D.C., learn more about distracted driving and bring it back to our community,” McGonagill said. Barker and Allen will bring back the information and resources they receive from the summit and host a local distracted driving prevention program, replicating the summit and its programming.Barker is also on the student council at Bleckley County High School with plans to study medicine after graduation. Allen also stays busy with FFA, dance and showing horses.While in the nation’s capital, the two will meet with legislators and tour historic sites and memorials in addition to attending the summit.(Jordan Hill is an intern with the UGA Tifton Campus.)last_img read more

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Vermont court upholds confidentiality of criminal investigation and inquest records

first_imgJudge Geoffrey W Crawford of the Vermont Superior Court, Civil Division, Washington Unit, recently issued two decisions upholding the confidentiality of criminal investigation and inquest records. In two separate cases, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Rutland Herald made public records requests to the Attorney General’s Office. The Herald’s request was also directed to the Department of Public Safety. The Court found that these requests were properly denied because the records are confidential under the Public Records Act.The ACLU filed suit over its request for copies of documents filed in court by the Attorney General’s Office to obtain cell phone tracking data. The Attorney General’s Office argued that any such documents could not be disclosed because they were part of an inquest proceeding that is confidential by law. The action filed by the Rutland Herald arose out of its request for records relating to a Vermont State Police criminal investigation into possible criminal conduct at the Vermont Police Academy. The Herald argued that the records should be disclosed because the investigation had been completed and no criminal charges were filed. In both cases, the Court concluded that the Legislature intended the requested materials to be kept confidential. The Court also concluded that the Legislature intended the confidentiality of criminal investigation records to continue beyond the conclusion of a criminal investigation.Attorney General William Sorrell reacted to the decisions: ‘There are good public policy reasons for protecting criminal investigative files from public disclosure, including protecting the privacy of victims of crime as well as that of individuals investigated but never criminally charged.’Source: Vermont AOG. 11.9.2010last_img read more

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Vermont Tech presidential search yields two finalists

first_imgThe Vermont State Colleges this week announced the selection of two finalists for the position of president of Vermont Technical College. The names of the candidates were sent to the Board of Trustees by its presidential search committee following interviews with four candidates during the week of November 15. The two finalists sent to the Board of Trustees are Dr Kathleen Nelson, former president and President Emeritus of Lake Superior College in Duluth, Minnesota; and Dr Philip Conroy, Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing at Mount Ida College in Newton, Massachusetts.The trustees will interview the finalists and consider a selection at their regular meeting on December 9th.Forty-seven applicants from around the country applied for the position following a national search that was begun last June when former president Ty Handy took on the presidency of Northwest Florida State College in Niceville, FL. Members of a board-appointed search committee that included faculty, staff, students, trustees, and VSC Chancellor Tim Donovan narrowed that list first to eleven, then to four semi-finalists by early November. All four semi-finalists were then invited to campus for interviews, which concluded last week.Dr. Nelson served for 13 years as president of Lake Superior College, a comprehensive community and technical college serving approximately 4,500 students in both urban and rural communities. During her tenure at Lake Superior she was twice recognized as President of the Year by the Minnesota State College Student Association.Dr. Nelson was also the recipient of the Lake Superior College Student Senate Lifetime Achievement Award and the City of Duluth’s coveted Sam Solon Legislative Leadership Award. From 1995-1997 Dr. Nelson served as the Vice President and Chief Academic Officer of the Laurentian Community and Technical College District, and she was Interim Vice President at the Arrowhead Community College Region from 1994-1995.Lake Superior is part of the Minnesota State College system, which is comprised of 32 colleges spread over 54 campuses.Dr. Conroy is currently Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing at Mount Ida College, responsible for admissions, financial aid, marketing, publications, the web site, public relations, and retention related activities. He has served in this capacity since 2003. Prior to taking on his current role, Conroy served for six years as Vice President for Institutional Advancement.Before joining Mount Ida in 1997, Conroy served as the Director of Development for the College of Food and Natural Resources at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and as Director of Development and founding Executive Director of the Bridgewater State College Foundation, where he also served as a faculty member, financial aid officer, and alumni relations director.Mount Ida is similar in size to Vermont Tech with approximately 1500 full- and part-time students, 60 percent of whom live on campus. The college is comprised of five separate schools specializing in animal science, business, design, and the arts and sciences. It also offers a Master of Science (MSM) degree program in management.‘The search committee was very pleased with the quality of applications for the position,’ commented Search Committee chair and trustee Martha O’Connor. ‘In particular, we are pleased to send these two excellent candidates for consideration by the Board of Trustees.’last_img read more

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Oakdale Man Accidentally Electrocuted to Death

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 75-year-old man died after mistakenly electrocuting himself while working on his Oakdale home on Tuesday evening.Suffolk County police said a family member found Erhard Mueller dead in the basement of his Connetquot Drive home with power tools nearby his body at 6:45 p.m.Mueller was pronounced dead at the scene.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img

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Disruptive banking: The good, the bad … and the opportunity

first_imgDevelop a plan – Implementing the technologies to keep your credit union competitive won’t happen overnight. It takes time and resources, so set priorities that will best meet customer demands and your development budget. The term “disruption innovation” is as recent as the 1990s, but the action behind it traces back to the first human technology – the innovation of farming some 12,000 years B.C. Fast forward to the 21st century and high-tech innovations are causing market disruptions in virtually every industry so fast it isn’t hard to keep up with all of them – it’s impossible!So, why do some in the financial industry think we are immune to disruptive banking?Good news, bad newsEconomic journalist John Authers, whose Financial Times career spans 20 years, says banks are too heavily regulated to be threatened by startups, though he admits they must adapt to new technology. JP Nichols, writer/adviser to financial and fintech firms disagrees. He says banking will always exist, but probably not current bank infrastructure – a subtle distinction missed by some of the more complacent in the industry. And Chris Skinner, independent commentator on the financial markets, is in the middle, believing banks and credit unions “are not being disrupted, just re-architected … with new business models, new ways of doing business, new opportunities to do things different and new technological concepts.” Sounds a lot like market disruption!The good news is most industry watchers don’t believe financial institutions are hovering on the edge of extinction … yet. But they do predict the need for change – and fast. Embracing the technologies that meet consumers’ demand for banking any way they want is no longer a “nice to have, it’s a necessity.” Even better news is that disruptive forces are causing a good number of banks to rethink their digital strategies, delivery processes and customer interactions, while forging a savvy course to strengthen their position in tomorrow’s marketplace.The bad news is lack of imagination coupled with the many external factors stressing banks today, such as non-financial market entrants, influence of mobile and commoditized products. Some institutions have yielded to pressures on resources and bottom lines by opting to merge or be acquired. Others say too many banks and credit unions are committed to preserving their legacy systems and processes, discounting the digital changes around them.Opportunity callingIn a disruptive banking environment, adaption is the entry, with customer and member relationships holding the key. Consumers today – especially the large and highly influential millennial generation – are fast embracing new technologies. Consider how quickly people of all ages have adapted to smart phones. More than 60 percent of American adults now carry them, according to the Pew Research Center. Many use them daily to access online services, including mobile banking.But the ease of using smart phones has also raised the bar on expectations about convenience. Thanks to online access by phone, quick-start tablets and wearable smart devices, people’s patience with yesterday’s manner of banking is waning – particularly among young adults. A 2013 Viacom Media Network study found most Millennials believe the way we access money and make payments will dramatically change in the next five years – with 33 percent saying they won’t need a traditional “bank” at all.Still, banking, especially payment systems, will always play a critical role in society – and our industry enjoys long-standing control of this system. For outsiders, the entry barriers of heavy regulation continue to prevail in an space already crowded with internal competition. Plus, most consumers don’t like the hassle of changing their PFI – probably why 40 percent of U.S. consumers have kept the same financial institution for 10+ years.We can counter emerging threats, but time is growing short. You can start now by reinforcing customer relationships, and determining where to update your tools, technology and capabilities. Here are some pointers:Transform your thinking – The influence of disruptive innovation on banking is here and gaining strength. But while it may shift many institutions into unfamiliar territory, it also presents opportunities. Pay attention to disruptions in other industries and envision how they might be applied to your credit union.Assess your marketing and data-collection tools – To reach customers today, you need a robust customer database, variable-field capabilities and data-mining programs to create messages directed to their needs and interests. Partner with a firm that has the tools and know-how to not just send personalized messages to customers, but also to help them easily respond to those promotions online. Omni-channel strategies – Integrate your consumer touch points – in-branch, website, call center, email, mobile, social. Make it simple to move from one channel to another, while keeping the look, feel and messaging consistent.Disruptive innovation has reached our industry, ready or not. Consumers want the convenience of banking anywhere at any time, but they also welcome personalized advice and resources to help manage their money and budget their spending. In fact, a 2014 study by Accenture shows that 25 percent say they would be willing to pay for it right now. Your customers are adapting to technology innovations; they’re waiting for you to do the same.center_img 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jesse Boyer Web: https://www.nihfcu.org Detailslast_img read more

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