The Drunken Hearts’ Andrew McConathy Talks YarmonyGrass & Upcoming Show With Victor Wooten Trio

first_imgColorado has a lot of truly hard working bands these days, as it has become a mecca for many musicians from various genres to live and be inspired to create. The Drunken Hearts are certainly one of those bands. With an increasingly heavy tour schedule, and the ongoing preparations to release new music, the band has a whole lot going on.We had the chance to catch up with lead singer and guitarist Andrew McConathy, who also is the force behind CO’s YarmonyGrass Festival, to discuss new music and direction for the Hearts in 2017, the band’s upcoming tour schedule, including a show with Victor Wooten and members of Leftover Salmon at Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom on March 24th (more info), and the 12th annual edition of YarmonyGrass.Live For Live Music: YarmonyGrass just announced its initial lineup, with headliners yet to be announced. Can you tell us what we can expect this year?Andrew McConathy: 2017 marks twelve years of YarmonyGrass and we have all sorts of surprises planned as far as the lineup goes. Announced already is Todd Snider backed by Great American Taxi, Head for the Hills, The Drunken Hearts, The Grant Farm featuring Andy Thorn from Leftover Salmon, Kitchen Dwellers, Coral Creek, Bonfire Dub, Jay Roemer Band featuring Dave Carroll from Trampled by Turtles, and many more. We have another act being announced on June 22 followed by our Headliners Announcement on Friday, July 14. While I can’t say who they are at this point, I can say they are all Yarmony favorites and our fans will not be disappointed.L4LM: The Drunken Hearts are heading to New York City this week with Brothers Roy (tonight – 3/16 at American Beauty). How often do you make it out to the east coast? Any interesting NYC experiences that you have had in the past?AM: This is our 3rd time playing in New York City since May. We are currently in the midst of a 5 week tour that started in Bellingham, WA and took us to Oregon, California, Nevada, an amazing WinterWonderGrass Festival in Steamboat, CO, Key West, Washington DC, and Pennsylvania. We played in Albany, NY last night and hit NYC, VT, and Connecticut next week before heading home for the big blowout show at Cervantes on March 24 with a stellar lineup of acts.A lot of interesting things have happened to us in NYC but one experience that comes to mind is our drummer, Alex Johnson, riding a carousel horse outside a bar after playing the Brooklyn Bowl. But like most things The Drunken Hearts find amusing, you probably had to be there.L4LM: You came out with Love & Thirst this past year, tell us a little about the album. Any new music coming out in 2017?AM: Love & Thirst took almost 3 years to record so we’re very happy that one is out and we’re all very proud of the sounds on that record. It was produced by Grammy winner Rob Eaton from Dark Star Orchestra who recorded Jimmy Buffett, Madonna, Pat Metheny, etc. so we were really lucky to get to work with him in the studio.We do have a new EP that we are putting the final touches on at Silo Sound in Denver with the talented Todd Divel. It’s called The Prize. All of the songs have a really unique feel to them and it’s a nice change of pace from Love & Thirst. While Love & Thirst was more of a step towards Southern Rock ‘n Roll, the songs on The Prize fall closer to an Americana vein, in that they all have their own identity and emotion. As a result, we are really trying to make those differences shine and stand out – even if it means not having full band instrumentation represented on each track, which I find very cool. We released the first single, “Tear My Heart Out” a few weeks ago and the rest will be out in a few months or so.L4LM: Soooo….The Drunken Hearted Medicine Show w/ Victor Wooten Trio, Drew & Andy Duo, Band of Heathens, Brad Parsons Band, Coral Creek at Cervantes on Friday, March 24th. That’s a killer lineup!AM: To say we were excited to help curate such a cool event is a huge understatement. I definitely have to hand it to Scott Morrill of Cervantes for connecting all the dots and having the faith in The Drunken Hearts to host such legends like Victor Wooten and Dennis Chambers, plus The Band of Heathens and our friends Drew Emmitt & Andy Thorn from Leftover Salmon. It’s going to be a heater, that’s for sure.Victor Wooten Discusses Music As An Art Of ExpressionL4LM: What are your thoughts about the rest of 2017 for the band?AM: The Drunken Hearts are really hitting our stride, evidenced by our crazy touring schedule. Like most good things in this life it doesn’t come easy – it’s taken a very long time and a lot of patience with each other as well as dedication to the art. We love what we’re doing and we’re doing what we love. That feels pretty good to say.Chris K from The Colorado Sound radio station recently dubbed us “the hardest working band in Colorado.” I’m not sure if that’s true or not because I know a lot of really hardworking and amazing bands from Colorado that deserve that title. But hell, we’ll take it.L4LM: Thanks for the time Andrew! Good luck with everything coming up in the near future.The Drunken Hearted Medicine Show with The Drunken Hearts, Victor Wooten Trio, Drew Emmitt & Andy Thorn Duo, Band of Heathens, and more is at Denver’s Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom on Friday, March 24th (purchase tickets here). YarmonyGrass will take place from August 10th-13th at Rancho Del Rio, CO with headliners still to be announced. For more information on that, check out the festival website.The Drunken Hearts Tour Dates:Mar 16 / American Beauty / New York, NYMar 17 / Nectar’s / Burlington, VTMar 18 / Bryac / Bridgeport, CTMar 19 / Bryac / Bridgeport, CTMar 24 / Cervantes’ Ballroom / Denver, CO *w/ Victor Wooten, BoHMar 25 / Hodi’s Half Note / Ft. Collins, CO *w/ Band of HeathensApr 13 / Founder’s Brewing / Grand Rapids, MIApr 14 / Tonic Room / Chicago, ILApr 15 / Scarlet & Grey / Columbus, OHApr 18 / ACME / Nashville, TNApr 21 / Last Concert Cafe / Houston, TXApr 22 / Lambert’s / Austin, TXApr 28 / Boulder Theater / Boulder, CO *w/ Bros. ComatoseMay 26 / Gold Room / Colorado Springs, COMay 27 / Paddlefest / Buena Vista, COMay 28 / Wind Rider Festival / Alto, NMMay 29 / Taos Mesa Brewing Co. / Taos, NMJul 20-23 / Floyd Fest / Floyd, VAAug 11-12 / YarmonyGrass / Rancho del Rio, COSept 1 / Four Corners Folk Festival / Pagosa Springs, COlast_img read more

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Neil Patrick Harris is Man of Year

first_imgHasty Pudding Theatricals, the oldest theatrical organization in the United States, has named Emmy Award-winning actor Neil Patrick Harris its 2014 Man of the Year. Harris joins Dame Helen Mirren, who was named Woman of the Year last week.The awards are presented annually to performers who have made lasting and impressive contributions to the world of entertainment. Established in 1951, the Woman of the Year Award has been given to many talented entertainers, including Katharine Hepburn, Jodie Foster, Elizabeth Taylor, and Meryl Streep. Past winners of the Man of the Year Award include Tom Cruise, Anthony Hopkins, Steven Spielberg, and Justin Timberlake.The Man of the Year festivities will take place Feb. 7. Hasty Pudding Theatricals will host a celebratory roast for Harris and present him with his Pudding Pot at Farkas Hall, Hasty Pudding’s home since 1888. Following the roast, Hasty will present the opening-night performance of its 166th production, “Victorian Secrets.”“I assume this is for that pudding-wrestling competition I won last April … right?” said Harris. “It was dark and seemed quite seedy at the time — I’m stoked that it’s connected with Harvard. Fancy! Can’t wait!”“We are pleased to present Mr. Harris with our Man of the Year Award honoring his distinguished contributions to the arts and entertainment industry,” said Tony Oblen ’14, president of Hasty Pudding Theatricals. “With his enviable reputation as a host and showman, we look forward to hosting Mr. Harris for an entertaining and unforgettable evening to recognize his achievements.”Equally successful on stage and screen, Harris currently stars as Barney Stinson in the CBS television series “How I Met Your Mother,” a role that has garnered him multiple Emmy and Golden Globe award nominations. He is a four-time Emmy Award winner for his guest-starring role on “Glee” and as host of the 63rd, 65th, and 66th Tony Awards. In addition to his numerous film and television credits, Harris has enjoyed success in the theater. He will make his return to Broadway in this spring in a production of John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask’s 1998 musical, “Hedwig and the Angry Inch.”Adapted from a Hasty Pudding Theatricals press release.last_img read more

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Alumna kicks off Love Your Body Week at SMC

first_imgTo mark the beginning of Love Your Body Week (LYBW) at Saint Mary’s, Whitney Werner, creator of the BeYOUtiful self-esteem program, talked about body image Monday in Vander Vennet Theatre in the Student Center. “If a person has one other person in their life to trust and be there for them, that can save them,” Werner said. “It is in small groups and small moments that big things can happen. The moments that you have with individual people can impact a person’s life.” Werner, a 2010 alumna of the College, developed BeYOUtiful three years ago to promote confidence in middle-school girls in South Bend. The program allows the girls to interact in a discussion format in which leaders guide the conversations. Sophomore Samantha Moorhead, co-chair of LYBW, said she thought Werner had a great story to tell Saint Mary’s. “Seeing the impact the program can have on those girls is so important for such a vulnerable age group,” Moorhead said. “Learning about how I can help and sharing with Saint Mary’s girls how they can help is important, [Werner] has such a powerful story that translates over to why she is so passionate about it.” Werner recounted her own experiences with bullying and self-harm. “Many of our physical issues we hate about our bodies make us look to fix our internal problems by trying to ‘fix’ external features,” Werner said. “Healing starts with us. … We can only take people as far as we have been willing to go with ourselves. By being willing to take care of ourselves, we become more empowered to help others.” Werner said one of the first steps to appreciating one’s body is to love who he or she is on the inside. “When people know they matter, it’s amazing how you can impact their life,” she said. Werner said low self-esteem affects how people treat others. “You have to have pride in things that you do,” she said. Werner suggested writing compliments on the bathroom mirror. “Write the truths you need to hear about yourself and tell yourself that every day,” she said. “Give yourself compliments. It does not have to be seen as an arrogant thing.” Women tend to compare their features to those thought to be ideal, Werner said. This makes women feel like they have failed. “A big part of it is realizing comparing isn’t healthy. I’m me and that’s okay,” Werner said. Junior Katherine Kautz said students at an all-women’s college like Saint Mary’s have a greater chance of comparing themselves to other women. “It stresses the fact that you need to start with respecting and loving yourself first,” Kautz said. Werner said women should focus on growing from the inside, out. “If you work on yourself, it develops beauty from a whole new way and spills onto other people,” she said.last_img read more

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Distracted Driving Prevention Summit

first_imgTwo Bleckley County 4-H members hope to educate their friends and community members about the dangers of distracted driving. Trevor Barker, a high school senior, and high school sophomore Jade Allen will travel to the 2014 Teen Distracted Driving Prevention Summit, hosted by the National Organization for Youth Safety, in Washington, D.C., Oct. 18 to Oct. 20. The two 4-H’ers were chosen from hundreds of national applicants to attend the event.“They were so ecstatic,” said Brandi McGonagill, Bleckley County Extension 4-H agent. “They posted it all over social media.”The Bleckley County 4-H students will be working alongside more than 20 students from across the country to learn how to engage their community and warn fellow teens about the dangers of distracted driving.Any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving is classified as “distracted driving.” Ten percent of all drivers under the age of 20 involved in fatal crashes were distracted at the time of the crash, and this age group has the largest proportion of distracted drivers.“These deaths are preventable,” said National Organizations for Youth Safety CEO Anita Boles in a press release. “Teens are especially prone to distractions. However, peer-to-peer education — led by youth — can save lives.”The upcoming distracted driving summit will feature presentations, educational activities and interactive training. The three-day summit will also feature four different panels: a distracted driving data/research panel, impact panel, parent influence panel and youth voice panel.The panels will focus on answering questions about teen brain development and distractions, how victims impact families and communities, and how affected individuals can inspire change.“It’s a great opportunity for them to go to D.C., learn more about distracted driving and bring it back to our community,” McGonagill said. Barker and Allen will bring back the information and resources they receive from the summit and host a local distracted driving prevention program, replicating the summit and its programming.Barker is also on the student council at Bleckley County High School with plans to study medicine after graduation. Allen also stays busy with FFA, dance and showing horses.While in the nation’s capital, the two will meet with legislators and tour historic sites and memorials in addition to attending the summit.(Jordan Hill is an intern with the UGA Tifton Campus.)last_img read more

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Vermont court upholds confidentiality of criminal investigation and inquest records

first_imgJudge Geoffrey W Crawford of the Vermont Superior Court, Civil Division, Washington Unit, recently issued two decisions upholding the confidentiality of criminal investigation and inquest records. In two separate cases, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Rutland Herald made public records requests to the Attorney General’s Office. The Herald’s request was also directed to the Department of Public Safety. The Court found that these requests were properly denied because the records are confidential under the Public Records Act.The ACLU filed suit over its request for copies of documents filed in court by the Attorney General’s Office to obtain cell phone tracking data. The Attorney General’s Office argued that any such documents could not be disclosed because they were part of an inquest proceeding that is confidential by law. The action filed by the Rutland Herald arose out of its request for records relating to a Vermont State Police criminal investigation into possible criminal conduct at the Vermont Police Academy. The Herald argued that the records should be disclosed because the investigation had been completed and no criminal charges were filed. In both cases, the Court concluded that the Legislature intended the requested materials to be kept confidential. The Court also concluded that the Legislature intended the confidentiality of criminal investigation records to continue beyond the conclusion of a criminal investigation.Attorney General William Sorrell reacted to the decisions: ‘There are good public policy reasons for protecting criminal investigative files from public disclosure, including protecting the privacy of victims of crime as well as that of individuals investigated but never criminally charged.’Source: Vermont AOG. 11.9.2010last_img read more

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Vermont Tech presidential search yields two finalists

first_imgThe Vermont State Colleges this week announced the selection of two finalists for the position of president of Vermont Technical College. The names of the candidates were sent to the Board of Trustees by its presidential search committee following interviews with four candidates during the week of November 15. The two finalists sent to the Board of Trustees are Dr Kathleen Nelson, former president and President Emeritus of Lake Superior College in Duluth, Minnesota; and Dr Philip Conroy, Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing at Mount Ida College in Newton, Massachusetts.The trustees will interview the finalists and consider a selection at their regular meeting on December 9th.Forty-seven applicants from around the country applied for the position following a national search that was begun last June when former president Ty Handy took on the presidency of Northwest Florida State College in Niceville, FL. Members of a board-appointed search committee that included faculty, staff, students, trustees, and VSC Chancellor Tim Donovan narrowed that list first to eleven, then to four semi-finalists by early November. All four semi-finalists were then invited to campus for interviews, which concluded last week.Dr. Nelson served for 13 years as president of Lake Superior College, a comprehensive community and technical college serving approximately 4,500 students in both urban and rural communities. During her tenure at Lake Superior she was twice recognized as President of the Year by the Minnesota State College Student Association.Dr. Nelson was also the recipient of the Lake Superior College Student Senate Lifetime Achievement Award and the City of Duluth’s coveted Sam Solon Legislative Leadership Award. From 1995-1997 Dr. Nelson served as the Vice President and Chief Academic Officer of the Laurentian Community and Technical College District, and she was Interim Vice President at the Arrowhead Community College Region from 1994-1995.Lake Superior is part of the Minnesota State College system, which is comprised of 32 colleges spread over 54 campuses.Dr. Conroy is currently Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing at Mount Ida College, responsible for admissions, financial aid, marketing, publications, the web site, public relations, and retention related activities. He has served in this capacity since 2003. Prior to taking on his current role, Conroy served for six years as Vice President for Institutional Advancement.Before joining Mount Ida in 1997, Conroy served as the Director of Development for the College of Food and Natural Resources at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and as Director of Development and founding Executive Director of the Bridgewater State College Foundation, where he also served as a faculty member, financial aid officer, and alumni relations director.Mount Ida is similar in size to Vermont Tech with approximately 1500 full- and part-time students, 60 percent of whom live on campus. The college is comprised of five separate schools specializing in animal science, business, design, and the arts and sciences. It also offers a Master of Science (MSM) degree program in management.‘The search committee was very pleased with the quality of applications for the position,’ commented Search Committee chair and trustee Martha O’Connor. ‘In particular, we are pleased to send these two excellent candidates for consideration by the Board of Trustees.’last_img read more

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Oakdale Man Accidentally Electrocuted to Death

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 75-year-old man died after mistakenly electrocuting himself while working on his Oakdale home on Tuesday evening.Suffolk County police said a family member found Erhard Mueller dead in the basement of his Connetquot Drive home with power tools nearby his body at 6:45 p.m.Mueller was pronounced dead at the scene.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img

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Disruptive banking: The good, the bad … and the opportunity

first_imgDevelop a plan – Implementing the technologies to keep your credit union competitive won’t happen overnight. It takes time and resources, so set priorities that will best meet customer demands and your development budget. The term “disruption innovation” is as recent as the 1990s, but the action behind it traces back to the first human technology – the innovation of farming some 12,000 years B.C. Fast forward to the 21st century and high-tech innovations are causing market disruptions in virtually every industry so fast it isn’t hard to keep up with all of them – it’s impossible!So, why do some in the financial industry think we are immune to disruptive banking?Good news, bad newsEconomic journalist John Authers, whose Financial Times career spans 20 years, says banks are too heavily regulated to be threatened by startups, though he admits they must adapt to new technology. JP Nichols, writer/adviser to financial and fintech firms disagrees. He says banking will always exist, but probably not current bank infrastructure – a subtle distinction missed by some of the more complacent in the industry. And Chris Skinner, independent commentator on the financial markets, is in the middle, believing banks and credit unions “are not being disrupted, just re-architected … with new business models, new ways of doing business, new opportunities to do things different and new technological concepts.” Sounds a lot like market disruption!The good news is most industry watchers don’t believe financial institutions are hovering on the edge of extinction … yet. But they do predict the need for change – and fast. Embracing the technologies that meet consumers’ demand for banking any way they want is no longer a “nice to have, it’s a necessity.” Even better news is that disruptive forces are causing a good number of banks to rethink their digital strategies, delivery processes and customer interactions, while forging a savvy course to strengthen their position in tomorrow’s marketplace.The bad news is lack of imagination coupled with the many external factors stressing banks today, such as non-financial market entrants, influence of mobile and commoditized products. Some institutions have yielded to pressures on resources and bottom lines by opting to merge or be acquired. Others say too many banks and credit unions are committed to preserving their legacy systems and processes, discounting the digital changes around them.Opportunity callingIn a disruptive banking environment, adaption is the entry, with customer and member relationships holding the key. Consumers today – especially the large and highly influential millennial generation – are fast embracing new technologies. Consider how quickly people of all ages have adapted to smart phones. More than 60 percent of American adults now carry them, according to the Pew Research Center. Many use them daily to access online services, including mobile banking.But the ease of using smart phones has also raised the bar on expectations about convenience. Thanks to online access by phone, quick-start tablets and wearable smart devices, people’s patience with yesterday’s manner of banking is waning – particularly among young adults. A 2013 Viacom Media Network study found most Millennials believe the way we access money and make payments will dramatically change in the next five years – with 33 percent saying they won’t need a traditional “bank” at all.Still, banking, especially payment systems, will always play a critical role in society – and our industry enjoys long-standing control of this system. For outsiders, the entry barriers of heavy regulation continue to prevail in an space already crowded with internal competition. Plus, most consumers don’t like the hassle of changing their PFI – probably why 40 percent of U.S. consumers have kept the same financial institution for 10+ years.We can counter emerging threats, but time is growing short. You can start now by reinforcing customer relationships, and determining where to update your tools, technology and capabilities. Here are some pointers:Transform your thinking – The influence of disruptive innovation on banking is here and gaining strength. But while it may shift many institutions into unfamiliar territory, it also presents opportunities. Pay attention to disruptions in other industries and envision how they might be applied to your credit union.Assess your marketing and data-collection tools – To reach customers today, you need a robust customer database, variable-field capabilities and data-mining programs to create messages directed to their needs and interests. Partner with a firm that has the tools and know-how to not just send personalized messages to customers, but also to help them easily respond to those promotions online. Omni-channel strategies – Integrate your consumer touch points – in-branch, website, call center, email, mobile, social. Make it simple to move from one channel to another, while keeping the look, feel and messaging consistent.Disruptive innovation has reached our industry, ready or not. Consumers want the convenience of banking anywhere at any time, but they also welcome personalized advice and resources to help manage their money and budget their spending. In fact, a 2014 study by Accenture shows that 25 percent say they would be willing to pay for it right now. Your customers are adapting to technology innovations; they’re waiting for you to do the same.center_img 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jesse Boyer Web: https://www.nihfcu.org Detailslast_img read more

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Pandemic propels old-school bond traders towards an electronic future

first_imgHis experience illustrates how the volatility caused by the crisis, along with a new remote mindset of working from home, has pushed more traders to go digital in a market that has historically lagged stocks and forex in electronification.That trend is reflected in the business on electronic bond-trading platforms.For example MarketAxess, one of the biggest players, enjoyed record trading volumes in March. At rival Tradeweb, average daily turnover hit a record aggregate $1 trillion in that month, a more than 41 percent year-on-year increase.Meanwhile MTS, part of the London Stock Exchange Group, said it won several large asset managers in Europe as clients during the crisis.Read also: Investors turn to government bonds amid market uncertaintyYet traders stress that dealers and clients speaking to one another will long remain a key component of the industry, especially at times of heightened volatility.Even as Rasmussen went electronic to push through his trade, for example, he was also talking to buyers to agree “switches” – swapping one type of US bond for another to share risk.The jump in electronic trading activity coincided with both a rush into government bonds as the coronavirus sparked demand for safe-haven assets, and then a sharp selloff as investors sold their most liquid assets to make up for losses elsewhere.Liquidity and transparencyElectronic trading – where transactions are carried out using software on online platforms, rather than via dealer-client “voice” trades – can carry major benefits for the $100 trillion-plus world of government and corporate debt.Regulations such as MiFID II in Europe to improve transparency have also boosted electronic trading.For one, traders executing deals can quickly gauge market depth on their screens, freeing time for more complex trades. For another, it offers lower costs for investors; two dealers estimated it to be 10 percent-30 percent cheaper than traditional voice trades.Electronic bond trading activity surges in March. Data source: MarketAxess. (Reuters Graphics/Ritvik Carvalho)Nonetheless, while most bond industry players acknowledge that much of the future is digital, many have been reluctant to go fully electronic.Around 45 percent of the European fixed-income market is electronically traded, versus 38 percent a year ago, consultancy Greenwich Associates estimates. In the $6.6 trillion-a-day currency market, 90 percent of spot trading is conducted digitally.However the COVID-19 crisis is accelerating the electronification of the bond market, according to industry players.Many such as Tony Rodriguez, US-based head of fixed income strategy at Nuveen Asset Management, said a need for greater liquidity had boosted electronic trading activity.“A lot of trades were pushed electronically because of greater liquidity and transparency – so the crisis pushed what was already in place,” he said.Andrew Falco, global head of FX and fixed income trading at Fidelity International in London credits electronic trading with allowing connectivity in a market suddenly dispersed by remote working.This kind of technology enabled the transition from working in an office to working from kitchen tables, he told Reuters.Read also: Bond financing to swell further as Finance Ministry plans to issue samurai bondsHe said some lessons had been learned about this last year when Fidelity’s Hong Kong team struggled to work in the office because of the unrest roiling the city.“So for us in 2020, we finessed the e-trading home set-up and ensured it worked well, whether it was in HK, Shanghai, Dublin or the UK,” he added.‘Imagine this 25 years ago’For the banks who provide dealer and execution services, though, the electronic shift may be eating into fixed-income revenues; during the March quarter, earnings from bond trading at the world’s biggest 12 banks remained below levels seen in 2014, research firm Coalition calculates.But they too are accelerating the push to digital services, particularly for the automation that helps them when volatility spikes.JP Morgan, for instance, uses an algorithm to help generate price quotes on its forward FX platform, which includes bonds, fielding “hundreds of thousands of enquiries” and transacting “thousands of trades a day” during the crisis, said Tom Prickett, co-head of EMEA rates at the bank.Another big player, Goldman Sachs, said clients ramped up calls for the electronification and automation of companies’ bond sales, until now a slow process conducted manually.“The crisis revealed some of those shortcomings in bright lights,” said David Wilkins, Goldman’s head of FICC execution services in EMEA.Investors and traders acknowledged that digital technology had been a saviour during the pandemic, a view expressed across a host of industries.Read also: Investing in bonds safe bet amid market volatility: Experts“Imagine something like this happening 25 years ago, when emails didn’t exist, electronic communication was not really there,” said Zoeb Sachee, head of euro linear rates trading at Citibank who oversees government bond trading in European markets.The old and the newBut, for the foreseeable future at least, the bond market is likely to encompass the old and the new: technology as well as traditional trading models based on dealer-client relationships.Traders of European investment-grade corporate bonds during the crisis often negotiated deals by phone before using a platform to settle, according to an International Capital Market Association (ICMA) report.“Bond markets are very much relationship-driven and I don’t see how that goes away,” said report author Andy Hill.This was echoed by Falco at Fidelity.“The view that we felt as a team was that we would use technology where we had confidence in the price that we could see on the screen, and when we didn’t have the confidence in the price, we would execute manually.”Topics : The mammoth bond market has long been the old-school bastion of the financial world, but the COVID-19 pandemic has cast a light on its future – and it looks electronic. Well, mainly.At the height of the market panic in March, Seattle-based Brandon Rasmussen, a senior fixed-income trader at US$300 billion asset manager Russell Investments, had a client order to sell $2.5 billion worth of United States Treasuries.He found, though, that such a transaction was near-impossible in a highly volatile market that made no exceptions for even one of the world’s most sought-after assets. Dealers refused to quote prices by phone, adding to the stress of executing a large order without distorting the market.Read also: Retail govt bond coupon of 6.4% attractive for investors: AnalystsThe solution Rasmussen eventually settled on was to break the order up into smaller chunks and process them electronically – something he may not have considered a few weeks earlier.“The feedback that we got from dealers was that they were not quoting on the phone. They couldn’t do that, they couldn’t keep up with that,” he said. “I think what this crisis has shown is that really if you weren’t trading electronically, you should be trading electronically.”last_img read more

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Max Allegri has two big concerns about replacing Freddie Ljungberg at Arsenal

first_imgArsenal’s misfortunes have continued under interim boss Ljungberg (Picture: Getty)Allegri, who guided Juve to five successive Serie A titles, is one of the names in the frame, but according to The Evening Standard he is sceptical about taking over the reins in north London.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTFirstly, the Italian needs to be convinced of the club’s ambition, with the side having fallen 10 points adrift of the Champions League places, while several key players are running down their contracts.Secondly, he needs to be shown that Arsenal genuinely want him to take over, having been left disappointed with how he was overlooked when the club were looking for a replacement for Arsene Wenger.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalAllegri was interviewed for the Arsenal job in the summer of 2018 but was beaten to the role by Emery, while Manchester City coach Mikel Arteta was also believed to have been ahead of the Italian in the Arsenal board’s thinking.If Arsenal do now want Allegri as their manager they will have to wait until the summer with the 52-year-old confirming that he will not take over a club midway through the season. Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 7 Dec 2019 2:00 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Advertisement Allegri is enjoying his year out of management and will not return until June (Picture: Getty)Speaking to ESPN, he explained: ‘I don’t know if you can call it a sabbatical or not. As soon as the relationship with Juventus came to an end, the decision was to take a year out.‘Next year will be an important year. Important for the choice I end up making and the need to be prepared for it. After a year out and five years at Juventus, I don’t want to go back into the game and do badly.’MORE: Max Allegri distances himself from Arsenal job and says he will not return to management until JuneMORE: Arsenal fans turn on Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang for ‘abusing’ Joe Willock after misplaced pass in Brighton defeatMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City Commentcenter_img The Italian coach will take some persuading to move to the Emirates (Picture: Getty)Former Juventus manager Massimiliano Allegri has reservations about taking over at Arsenal and will need convincing to join after being overlooked for the role previously in favour of Unai Emery.The Gunners are currently on their longest run without a league win since 1977, with interim manager Freddie Ljungberg suffering defeat in his home bow at the Emirates against Brighton on Thursday night.While Arsenal’s hierarchy are happy to remain patient in their hunt for a permanent successor to Emery, and will give Ljungberg time to prove his credentials, they are drawing up a list of candidates. Max Allegri has two big concerns about replacing Freddie Ljungberg at Arsenal Advertisementlast_img read more

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