Unifine Food & Bake Ingredients

first_imgThe bun spice formula from Unifine Food & Bake Ingredients (Milton Keynes, Bucks) is three times as strong as the average liquid spice, claims the firm. Quality Bun Spice enhances the flavour of fruit in specialities such as hot cross buns, Bath buns, teacakes, fruit loaves and tea breads. It also banishes that bitter aftertaste often associated with spice concentrates, says Unifine.”The price per kilo for the Quality product is unashamedly higher than that of its standard Bun Spice,” says Unifine. “But it works out very competitively in the long run as the higher concentration makes a little go a long way.”Unifine also supplies seasonal Sucrea Deco 2D Shapes to decorate muffins, biscuits and desserts.last_img read more

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Speech: Damian Hinds speech at National Governance Association conference

first_imgI want to begin with a huge thank you – to those of you in this room, and to governors, trustees and clerks, up and down the country.One of our undoubted strengths as a country, a very British quality… is this sense of duty felt by communities towards our public institutions – we see our schools and the education of our children, rightly, as a shared responsibility, a shared enterprise.But there are some people who take their share of responsibility to a much, much higher level.What you do as governors and trustees can’t simply be measured in hours spent. Although, of course, I do also recognise it is also a large volume of hours.But it’s also the weight of responsibility. Making budgets add up, recruiting and retaining staff, helping to set your school’s whole ethos and vision for the future.And of course, knowing all the while that these decisions will affect children’s futures and, ultimately, our nation’s future.And I know that for some of you, the role of governor has also changed considerably in recent years.There are now around 2,800 academy trusts involved in running schools, which means even greater reach and capacity to improve the education of even more children but also more responsibility as well.So, once again – thank you. Whether you represent a primary or secondary school, an academy or local authority maintained school, a faith school, a Further Education College, or one of our incredible schools helping children with special needs or delivering Alternative Provision.Thank you for volunteering and for fitting being a governor around your other jobs, your other commitments, and of course your families.Fundamentally this is a people business. There is nothing more important in education than the people delivering it. Great teachers, great heads – and of course great governors.Good and effective governance is essential for any school – you can’t separate it from educational performance or good management.So today I will talk about how I intend to support you, and support good governance and leadership in schools.And I’ll start with recruitment and retention.Now I know that for many of you teacher recruitment and retention is a top and live issue for many of you – and it’s a top priority for me as well.Yes it is true that there are more teachers in schools than ever before – but also pupil numbers are rising. And with an improving economy, the strong recruitment market the competition for bright graduates is intense.So I am determined to make sure that teaching remains one of the most attractive and fulfilling jobs you can do.By supporting schools to bear down on excessive workload.By strengthening professional development, in the crucial early period and throughout careers.And by promoting more flexible working – indeed we have a workshop here today.I also want to do everything I can to help boost governor recruitment and retention – because simply we need more great people like you.So today I’m issuing a call to arms, appealing to people up and down the country to join you in this vital role.As Emma Knights has said previously, good governance needs a range of voices. And that was powerfully on display in the video we have just seen – and I champion the work NGA are doing, through your Everyone on Board campaign, to encourage more diversity – and for more women in leadership roles.Governing and trust boards should reflect the communities they serve.So, I want to urge people from different backgrounds, different professions, to come forward – to offer up their time, energy, skills, and expertise.Parent governors continue to be crucial and I’d like to see more young people get involved, more people from black and ethnic minority communities, more people from right across society with the ability and experience to lead.First, because so many people want to give something back to their community, this is truly one of the most valuable and far reaching ways you can do that.Of course, it’s not work to be undertaken lightly but there is great fulfilment to be found from it, as you know. Some of you start as a governor at your own children’s school – they grew up, and you’re still involved.Because you care – because you’re dedicated to doing your best for your school and, in a sense, your ‘other’ children – your extended and very diverse family.All of whom you want to have the highest standard of education and the chance to fulfil their potential.And now that we have trusts that cover groups of schools, there are many more lives that volunteers can influence, going beyond their own immediate community.Governors’ own words on this will carry far more weight than mine – and that’s why my department is launching a new recruitment video online for social media and asking you to add your voice to this call for more governors.I’m also making an appeal today to the nation’s employers.Supporting your staff to be governors gives employers the opportunity to invest in their local community. The opportunity to shape the talent pool of the future – and, let’s not forget, it is a great development opportunity for staff.With the strategic thinking involved, the challenge of managing resources, of recruiting and retaining the best people. How can you beat that for personal and management development?It’s not just schools either – governors of Further Education colleges are key to providing the skills and training businesses need, and they will play a pivotal role delivering our new T Level qualifications.So, that’s why I’m writing to the 30,000 members of the Institute of Directors, urging them to encourage employees to take on this role, and give them the time it requires.And I want to say thank you to Inspiring Governance and Academy Ambassadors for the work they do on recruiting and supporting new governors and trustees – if you are not aware of these organisations please do take a moment to look at their website and encourage others interested in volunteering to do so as well.I also want to offer greater support to existing governors and trustees.So I’m announcing today that funding for governor and trustee training will be doubled to £6 million up to 2021.And we will continue to work with organisations, like the NGA, to develop and improve the guidance and other materials available to governors, trustees and clerks.I recently spoke to heads from across the country – and I had a message for the many excellent schools, which was simply this: I trust you to get on with the job.My vision for these schools is simply that they are clear on what’s expected of them – and largely autonomous from government.I have also acknowledged that, vital as accountability is, the current system that we have can lead to stress and anxiety for some teachers, leaders and governors – the fear of inspection, of a single bad results year, the fear of the school being made to convert to an academy.I want becoming an academy, with all the benefits that brings, to be a positive choice for schools – I don’t want it to be seen as a punitive threat.I recently set out key principles for how I see the accountability system working in the future, which we will be consulting on in the Autumn. I urge you and your schools to feed in your views.In the future, an Ofsted Inadequate judgement alone would lead to hard action to convert a Local Authority maintained school to an academy. And schools will no longer face those visits from Regional Schools Commissioners’ advisers that can sometimes feel a lot like an inspection.On those rare occasions when a school is failing – be in no doubt – we will intervene fast and we will take the serious action necessary.But otherwise, as I’ve said, I want to trust governing bodies and school leaders to get on with the job.And that’s why we’ll also build on our offer of support to schools that need it. Here I want to recast accountability not as something to be feared, or a blame game – but rather analysing what’s not working and then fixing it, collaboratively.Let me say a word about multi-academy trusts.The vision behind these trusts is a simple one: it’s about schools together doing more than they can on their own. It’s about great schools widening their influence, getting the best teachers to where they are needed, sharing best practice across their local area and beyond.It’s about finding more effective and more efficient ways of doing things.Ultimately, it’s about sharing knowledge and innovation – which of course is the basis of education and, indeed, all human progress. We pool our ideas, our experiments, our mistakes, and yes our successes – and we learn and improve.And we know the academies programme has had a transformational impact in turning round failing schools. Ofsted data shows that over 480,000 children now study in sponsored primary or secondary academies that are good or outstanding, the vast majority of which are part of a multi-academy trust – and these were, typically, previously underperforming schools.In 2014, around 2,500 state-funded schools were in Multi Academy Trusts. This has grown to around 6,200 this year and I do expect that’s a trend which will continue.This doesn’t mean we won’t still have diversity across the education system – but increasingly I think we’ll see more and more trusts being set up, growing to scale, and adopting the practices that, we know, quite simply, work.We know that good governance, whether exercised at board or local level, is informed by meaningful engagement with parents to understand their views and listen to their feedback.It is vital that boards are connected with the parents and carers and communities they serve. We do not want to see boards become detached or distant from parents.But if trusts have a growing and increasingly important role in our system we need to make sure that our system of oversight and decision-making keeps up with that development.Parents, carers – and indeed schools – want to know: what value are they getting for the money their trust spends?And as a school system, we increasingly need to take decisions about trusts as well. Which trust is best placed to take on and improve a particular failing school? How quickly should we allow a particular trust to grow?And – in rare cases – where the trust itself is failing or providing weak governance, we need to take action.Of course, we can get part of the answer by looking at the educational performance of schools already in a trust. We already do this, through publishing MAT-level performance tables and working with Ofsted on batched inspections.And in addition we publish considerable financial information about trusts – the latest academy trust financial benchmarking data will be published next week.Our Regional Schools Commissioners use clear published criteria when deciding whether to allow a MAT to set up or expand.But I recognise these approaches only take us so far. They don’t give the full picture of the overall contribution made by the trust – including in governance and overall financial management – and what this means for its capacity to take on more schools.So I have concluded that we need to have a transparent way of assessing the strength of individual trusts and the services they offer. The value for public money of their offer to schools.This will make our decision-making more transparent and fairer. It will mean that schools and parents can easily access vital information about what being part of a particular trust will actually offer them.We need to give real careful thought to how this would work. Which body or bodies are best placed to make this assessment of trusts.The assessment will inevitably look different to an Ofsted school inspection – which will involve looking at very different things.I want to take time to get this right, and I will not introduce anything that adds to teachers and school leaders and governors’ workload.So I will work closely with the sector, with Ofsted, the ESFA, my regional teams and others in the coming months.In particular, I want to invite and listen carefully to proposals from MAT and school leaders across the country – before setting out a way forward later this year.I want to make sure that every pound of public money for our schools is used in the best possible way for the good of our children and for our society. That means taking a tough approach in the rare cases where those involved in running schools break the agreements we have in place with them.We will have a new more robust process to manage related-party transactions made by academy trusts.Of course, some related-party transactions are perfectly legitimate and represent good value for money, but I think pretty much everyone would agree that a situation where board members could simply hand out contracts to companies that they or their family and business contacts have an interest – that is not okay.Which is why from April trusts will have to seek approval from EFSA for related-party transaction payments of more than £20,000. Transactions below £20,000 will need to be formally declared.We also want to be clear about our expectations on high pay – for all schools not just academies.There is no doubt that our school system has many great leaders – and for large and complex organisations, pay, of course, must reflect the scale of the task.However, pay needs to be proportionate, and I am clear that pay rises for non-teaching management should not exceed those awarded to teaching staff. And when considering what’s fair, trusts and boards should not just compare pay rises over a single year, but look and compare over a number of years, at a time when public finances have been really stretched.This is public money and, frankly, I think that for a headteacher or Chief Executive to be paid more than the Prime Minister, this should be only in exceptional circumstances for exceptional leadership.So I want to urge all trusts to take a lead here and bear down on excessive salaries – you have our backing on that. In fact my department is today setting out clearer expectations around executive pay so you have the guidance you need.We will be requiring academy accounts returns to detail all staff paid over £100,000 and the percentage of teaching time those individuals undertake.And, rest assured, where salaries are too high – we will publicly challenge trusts and boards to justify themselves.I’ve also said I want to work with schools of all types to help them with budgets and cost pressures.And let me just acknowledge once again that, while it is true there is more money going in to schools than ever before, society asks more of schools than ever before. And budgets are tight.I have pledged to work with schools as best I can to reduce some of the cost pressures. And as we enter negotiations in the run-up to the Spending Review I will of course be making a strong case to the Treasury to ensure our school system has the resources it needs.We know that there are great suppliers out there – but frankly there are also companies that won’t stop short of taking advantage. Equally, individual schools can find it hard to get the best deals and find economies of scale.A few years ago schools were paying £75 per pupil for all their insurance requirements.But DfE worked with the market to create a core cover protection offer, meaning that schools that join the scheme can save £40 per pupil, while even for schools not taking part market prices have dropped by an average of £20 per pupil.And we’re expanding the range of deals to help schools save money on goods and services that they buy regularly. For example, these can save schools up to 10% on their energy bills and up to 40% or more on printers, photocopiers and scanners.And a new national deal on supply agency fees will be launched later this year. We know that schools have reported supply agencies demanding as much as 30% of a teacher’s annual salary as a finder’s fee where the school wishes to hire them permanently. Our new deal will drive down agency margins and restrict the use of finder’s fees.This year the government has been piloting two new approaches: buying hubs in the North West and South West which provide free procurement advice to more than 600 schools; and school resource management advisers providing hands-on support to schools that need it most.We also have our top 10 planning checks and online benchmarking service – which help governors ask the right questions and check how their school or trust compares with others in similar circumstances.Ladies and gentlemen, we want – we need – all schools to be offering world-class education to every child, in every classroom. As society progresses, it’s right that we are even more ambitious for children and especially for the most disadvantaged – including those with special needs, disabilities and children in the care system.Once again – thank you. Without you our schools simply wouldn’t run.I pledge to work with the NGA and with businesses to encourage people to volunteer to become governors and do what you do. I’ll help governors to access the training they need.And, I’ll support effective governance – making sure that our accountability system doesn’t create unnecessary workload, but instead identifies where things aren’t working and how we can fix it.Helping more schools to work together including through Multi Academy Trusts and making sure that every pound counts.Across all of this – there is only one aim, that we all share, to improve education for every child, whatever their background, wherever they live.I will work with you, with the NGA, with all governors and all schools – to seek to make this shared ambition come true.Thank you.last_img read more

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‘Spider-Man,’ the scavenger hunt

first_imgWhen Sony Pictures contacted the Harvard Museum of Natural History about doing something fun to accompany the release of the new movie “The Amazing Spider-Man,” museum officials had a creative idea.The museum drew thousands of new visitors last year with its Harry Potter Scavenger Hunt. Its new Spider Sense! Scavenger Hunt promises to entertain fans of Spider-Man and natural science alike. “We took a pop culture theme and used it as a segue into natural history and science,” said Janis Sacco, director of exhibitions at the museum. “It’s an interesting way to introduce people to science.”The scavenger hunt helps visitors to understand the relationships between the fictional superhero and the natural world. Visitors can pick up a scavenger hunt sheet at the front desk and explore the spider exhibit and others that relate to Spider-Man’s powers, and see a live tarantula.“We took a pop culture theme and used it as a segue into natural history and science,” said Janis Sacco, director of exhibitions at the museum. “It’s an interesting way to introduce people to science.”The film is a refreshed take on the classic Marvel comic book series, in which Peter Parker, a young photographer, is bitten by a radioactive spider and gains superpowers, such as the ability to make webs of strong silk and to crawl on walls, as well as a “sixth sense” that allows him to sense and locate danger.Although the sixth sense is a fairly common premise for science fiction, the ability for an animal to have such a sense and similar extraordinary powers is not fictional at all.“We humans understand five senses,” said Sacco. “However, other animals do use other senses. It’s not at all impossible for Spider-Man to have the sixth sense because other animals do.” For example, certain fish have the ability to sense danger; they can anticipate encroaching predators and escape quickly. Spider-Man’s ability to shoot super-strong cables from his fingers is not wholly unrealistic either. Pound for pound, spider silk is tougher than Kevlar and stronger than steel, noted Sacco.Mariah O’Brien, 9, a student at the Bates School in Salem, Mass., looks at a preserved sea spider as part of the Spider Sense! Scavenger Hunt.The scavenger hunt will run daily from now until Sept. 3, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  According to museum officials, wall-crawling ability and tolerance to numbing toxins are not required.last_img read more

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Dirtying their hands to grasp Viking history

first_imgWould you like to try a little mead? Tour a Viking replica ship? Search for remnants of pirate raiders from the eighth, ninth, 10th, and 11th centuries? If the answer is “yes,” the Harvard Summer School’s program in Scandinavia is for you.Run by Harvard’s Stephen Mitchell in collaboration with scholars from Aarhus University in Aarhus, Denmark, and the nearby Moesgaard Museum, the program immerses students in the Viking age through lectures, close readings of medieval sagas, museum visits, burial grounds, archaeological sites, and fieldwork.“It’s a very busy but wonderful way to teach,” said Mitchell, the Robert S. and Ilse Friend Professor of Scandinavian and Folklore, who co-directs the program with Aarhus scholar Pernille Hermann. Together they led a group of students, 12 from Harvard, on a summer journey in Denmark.When developing the curriculum more than a decade ago, Mitchell and his colleagues envisioned “an amazing kind of introduction to this line of work we are in — a combination of both the literary analysis and the archaeology and the hands-on kind of experience.”Jacob Verrey ’19 and Emily Valentin ’20 take measurements before breaking ground at the dig site. Credit: Peter Jensen and Jacob VerreyThis year’s two-month course touched down in Aarhus, Copenhagen, and the Danish island of Samsø, home of a field school and an organic farm that yields potatoes, asparagus, and strawberries. In an area the size of Harvard Yard, the students harvested something else entirely.Discolorations in the sand are the only indications of where Viking-era structures once stood at the field school’s dig site. Harvard sophomore Jessica Ding uncovered animal bones, including a jawbone with an attached tooth, pieces of charcoal and burnt stone, and bits of amber. She also found shards of pottery.“If you find a piece that includes the rim of a pot, you can date it to a particular time period based on the shape of the rim,” Ding explained in an email, noting that some of the pottery pieces she uncovered were indeed from the eighth- to 11th-century Viking era.Some discoveries prompt more questions than answers. Last year, students found part of a woman’s brooch from ninth-century France. The date coincided with a Viking attack on Paris.“It could easily be a trade item,” Mitchell said. “It could easily have been something that was purchased legitimately and brought here for a present. But it could also be a piece of raid item — loot.”A view of Stavns Fjord on the Danish island of Samsø, the home of the summer program’s field school. Credit: Peter Jensen and Jacob VerreyAn inquisitive spirit informs final projects. Standard papers are an option, but Mitchell happily accepts less traditional forms of scholarship. Last year one student drew water from a Bronze Age well, added a bit of honey, waited for it to ferment, and produced “a fabulous mead,” said Mitchell. Two others researched the origins of hammerscale, a “flaky or spheroidal byproduct of the iron forging process,” as noted in the Wikipedia entry on the topic that became their final project. Other past projects include a meal cooked in a fire pit using local herbs, knapped flint tools, and carded, spun, and dyed raw wool.A fan of Norse mythology from a young age, Jacob Verrey ’19 said the summer course was “almost like a dream come true.”“We’ve learned how to use literature and archaeology to reconstruct the Viking era,” the psychology concentrator said via Skype from Denmark. “The course has really taught us how to use all of these tools available to us to get at the Viking culture.”That toolkit includes the famous sagas that describe Norse seafarers battling oceans and armies with seemingly equal verve.“Vikings go out on these massive adventures, serve foreign kings, tour foreign lands, and they bring back all this glory,” said Verrey, recalling the story of one particularly robust raider who is said to have fought off legions of attackers before meeting his death.“It’s very, very vivid,” he added. “Who doesn’t like that stuff?”Students take part in the Danish tradition of roasting bread over an open fire. Credit: Peter Jensen and Jacob VerreyMany of the texts “read like modern novels,” Mitchell said. “People have experiences. They feel, experience sorrow and grief. They experience trauma. … They are amazingly insightful stories.”The chance to acquaint himself with new people and different traditions was another program highlight for Verrey.“You get to see how the world is through the perspective of another culture, to see what other people are like, and to see how other people view the world,” said the Chicago native, who took a particular liking to the Danish spin on a traditional American campfire treat.“Instead of roasting marshmallows, we roasted raw bread dough on sticks over an open fire,” he recalled. “You really don’t get that in the United States.”While Mitchell realizes that most students won’t pursue Viking studies after graduation, he also knows the program offers important lessons.“I do think that people never read a text the same way,” he said. “I don’t think they ever go into a museum the same way. I think they really feel very, very differently about the experiences they have.”last_img read more

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Clueless Musical Could Be Coming to Broadway with Katy Perry

first_img “Perry has expressed interest, and I love her to death,” Heckerling said. While the writer acknowledged the pop superstar’s crazy schedule, she also offered another suggestion for the show’s lead: “Maybe Iggy [Azalea] wants to do it!” Her appreciation for the film is no secret, as seen in the music video for her summer hit “Fancy.” Clueless is loosely based on Jane Austen’s Emma and follows Cher, a high school student in Beverly Hills who, alongside best friend Dionne (both named after famous singers of the post who now do infomercials), decide to take a transfer student under their wing. After giving her a makeover and playing matchmaker, Cher discovers that despite her popularity, she herself is in need of a makeover to find the relationship she longs for. The film starred Alicia Silverstone, Stacey Dash, the late Brittany Murphy and Paul Rudd.  Wait, WHO’S a virgin who can’t drive?! Clueless screenwriter and director Amy Heckerling revealed to Vulture that she is in the early stages of working on a musical adaptation of the 1995 film for Broadway and has penned a book and lyrics. No potential composer was mentioned. But who would play Beverly Hills princess Cher? Is it possible that Katy Perry will roar on the Great White Way?center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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Roosevelt Man Sentenced for DWI Crash That Killed Girlfriend

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Roosevelt man was sentenced Friday to four to 12 years in prison for killing his 25-year-old girlfriend while driving drunk in the car that she got that day for her birthday.Horace Cummings had pleaded guilty in February at Nassau County court to second-degree manslaughter, reckless endangerment and driving while ability impaired by combined influence of alcohol and drugs.“This tragic case should remind everyone that you must be careful about who you are trusting with your life when you enter a car as a passenger,” Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas said.Prosecutors said that the 35-year-old man was drunk and high on drugs when he drove a Nissan Altima westbound on Front Street in Hempstead and crashed head on with an eastbound vehicle at 2:40 a.m. Nov. 21, 2015.His girlfriend, Diamond Hawkins, who had just received the car as a birthday gift, was killed in the crash. Cummings, who suffered non-life threatening injuries, initially told police that Hawkins was driving, authorities said. The other driver was not injured.Cummings was later indicted and surrendered to police Department on Aug. 8.last_img read more

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Good Governance: Board officer development

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Help everyone grow the skills to be chair.by: Les Wallace, Ph.D.In general I don’t recommend supporting any candidate for your board who you don’t believe could be chair. That’s a tall order, but also a helpful screen.Board officer leadership is a foundation for effective governance, yet one of the least-attended-to governance development domains. In the for-profit sector, the topic is gaining greater attention. In the not-for-profit sector, development offerings for specific board officers are rare. In the credit union space, officer development has been mostly barren until CUES’ Board Chair Development Seminar was introduced. (The next installment will be held in March in New Orleans.)Because many CU board members do not have prior board experience, they haven’t had good officer role models. Serving as the chair of a board (or vice-chair or secretary and so on) is not a “natural” leadership role like being a credit union manager or CEO. Serving as a board officer demands a servant leadership approach, a quiet influencing hand and a strong will when confronting aberrant board behavior.Chairs must be able to adeptly navigate some specific governance processes if they are to help the board be both efficient and effective. Here is just a sample of the domains of responsibility a board chair might be accountable for: driving high-performance governance; keeping track of board duties and putting them on the calendar; agenda setting; committee accountability; CEO partnership; meeting management/facilitation; government relations/advocacy; governance assessment; and handling feedback to board members from members at large. continue reading »last_img read more

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Two firms win NIAID support for Ebola-Marburg vaccines

first_imgOct 8, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Two biotechnology companies—Crucell, based in the Netherlands, and Integrated BioTherapeutics, based in Germantown, Md.—recently announced that they have received $30 million and $22 million contracts, respectively, from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to develop single vaccines that would protect against both Ebola and Marburg viruses.The two hemorrhagic fever viruses are sources of emerging infectious diseases in humans, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, and are considered category A bioterrorism agents by the US government. Both diseases are known for their high case-fatality rates, and there are no specific treatments or vaccines for Marburg and Ebola fevers.NIAID contracts for both companies provide further funding if the National Institutes of Health (NIH) exercises additional options for the vaccines: $40 million for Crucell and an extra $43 million for Integrated BioTherapeutics, according to press releases from both firms.Crucell pursues adenovirus vector technologyJaap Goudsmit, Crucell’s chief scientific officer, said in the company’s Oct 3 statement that the NIAID contract will support the development of its multivalent filovirus vaccine that uses its proprietary AdVac technology.”This award recognizes the scientific bases for using rare adenovirus serotypes to develop vaccines,” he said. “The contract builds upon earlier work Crucell has performed with the Vaccine Research Center at the NIH and brings us a step closer to being able to provide effective countermeasures against a highly lethal infectious disease.”Crucell said its AdVac technology involves inserting genetic material from a virus or pathogen into a “vector” that delivers the material directly to the immune system to stimulate an immune response.The AdVac technology is also designed to avoid problems with preexisting immunity to the most commonly used recombinant vaccine vector, adenovirus serotype 5, according to the company. Instead, the new technology is based on adenoviruses that don’t regularly occur in humans, such as Ad35, which may enable the vaccine to provoke a more robust immune response.Integrated BioTherapeutics advances VLP approachJavad Aman, president and chief scientific officer of Integrated BioTherapeutics, said in an Oct 2 statement from the company that the NIAID contract will support advanced development of its virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine against Ebola and Marburg viruses.”This is a significant step forward in our mission to improving public health and developing countermeasures for biodefense,” he said. “The contract will fund a major portion of the preclinical and clinical activities required to confirm and refine the activity in animals and verify the activity in humans.”The company said it is collaborating with researchers at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) to develop a VLP vaccine that that has broad-spectrum activity toward different strains of Ebola and Marburg viruses. It said the vaccine has been shown to provide broad protection in nonhuman primates.With the initial $22 million phase of the grant, Integrated BioTherapeutics said it will conduct preclinical activities and studies. If NIAID exercises its contract option, the extra fund would cover phase 1 and 2 clinical trials and lay the manufacturing groundwork.See also:Oct 3 Crucell press releasehttp://cws.huginonline.com/C/132631/PR/200810/1256673_5_5.htmlOct 2 Integrated BioTherapeutics press releasehttp://www.integratedbiotherapeutics.com/news.htmllast_img read more

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St David’s 2 aiming to put Welsh capital on the retail map

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Saint-Etienne confirm William Saliba will sign for Arsenal instead of Tottenham

first_imgWilliam Saliba is heading to Arsenal (Getty Images)Saint-Etienne have confirmed that William Saliba is set to sign for Arsenal but will remain on loan with them this season.The Gunners were in pole position to sign the 18-year-old after submitting a €30 million (£27m) offer to Saint-Etienne earlier this summer.But Tottenham attempted to hijack the move last week as they launched a higher offer to the French club along with a better contract proposal to the defender.Arsenal responded by increasing their own offer to €33m (£29.8m) fee plus a further €7m (£6.3m) in add-ons.ADVERTISEMENT Saliba will remain on loan at Saint-Etienne for this season (Getty Images)And Saint-Etienne’s president Bernard Caiazzo has now confirmed that the centre-back will be heading to the Gunners.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘Everything is on the right track with Arsenal,’ Caiazzo told Le Progres.‘William will play next season with us.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityArsenal are also hoping to complete a loan deal for Real Madrid midfielder Dani Ceballos next week.The 22-year-old Spaniard will join on a season-long loan but the Gunners will not have the option to permanently sign him from Madrid.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Advertisement Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 20 Jul 2019 11:38 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link98Shares Saint-Etienne confirm William Saliba will sign for Arsenal instead of Tottenham Commentlast_img read more

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