“Love is stronger than hate”: religious leaders respond to recent hate crimes

first_imgWhen asked what his faith has taught him about how to respond to attacks, he said that inclusion and tolerance are always the answer. Rabbi Brown said his congregation has had to increase security measures at the temple in recent years due to what he said is a rise in anti-Semitic incidents. According to F.B.I. hate crime statistics, hate crimes against Jews have increased almost 30%, including almost 900 crimes in 2018 alone. “The Torah does teach that we are to take care of the downtrodden, of the orphans, of the widows, of the foreigners, of the people who are not us, the other,” said Rabbi Brown Monday. “We are to bring them into our community and take care of them.”center_img VESTAL (WBNG) — A recent anti-Semitic attack in Rockland County has local Jewish leaders advocating for fighting hate with love. Rabbi Geoffrey Brown of Temple Israel in Vestal told 12 News Jewish religious texts place heavy emphasis on taking care of those less fortunate, and that love extends to all people.last_img read more

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Cornell University says students are not permitted to travel to China in response to coronavirus

first_imgFaculty and staff at the university must get approval from from Cornell’s International Travel Advisory and Response Team to travel. The campus says its committed to working with students if the travel advisory affects their academics. Campus officials say the university is prepared if the coronavirus comes to New York. The university says it “strongly recommends” against personal travel to the country. “Cornell Health has procedures in place to quickly identify anyone who might require evaluation and care for coronavirus, as well as an operational plan in the event of a national outbreak,” says Assistant Vice President of Student Campus Life for Health and Welling Sharon McCullen. For more information, go to Cornell University’s website by clicking here. ITHACA, N.Y. (WBNG) — Cornell University says it does not permit students traveling to mainland China in wake of the coronavirus outbreak.last_img read more

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BOCES Summer Youth Employment Program helps non-profits

first_img“It’s for kids who are in a certain economic bracket to get jobs to work over the summer,” said BOCES Center for Career and Technical Excellence Principal Matt Sheehan. Three additional beds are being built for sensory gardens, filled with materials like sand and stones. At the center, teens are building six garden beds for students and staff to grow produce in the fall. “A lot of the kids who end up in this school are not coming from a rural setup; they’re coming more from an urban. So them seeing that is important and then being able to do it, it’s attainable,” said Sheehan. “The most important part of this is not so much giving them jobs, but teaching them how to get jobs. That concept of what a job is, learning work skills and readiness skills, and how to apply,” said Sheehan. APALACHIN (WBNG) — Teens in the Broome-Tioga BOCES Summer Youth Employment Program are finishing up work Thursday. “We’ve been making picnic tables, and we were working on power tools and making the garden beds. And we were working on birdhouses,” said Union-Endicott student Dominic Rose, who is involved in the program. The program hires teens between the two counties, placing them at different non-profits around the area to help complete projects. On average, 250 kids join the Summer Youth Employment Program, but due to the pandemic, this year 140 teens are participating. One of the sites this summer is the BOCES West Learning Center in Apalachin. The program is a partnership between Broome-Tioga BOCES and DSS.last_img read more

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Farmers Market Week wraps up in Vestal

first_img“This is one of our main sources of income,” said Jonathan Soto of Norwich Meadows Farm. “In general for the community, it’s really important to support your local farms because these are the people who are living with you and providing you with high quality produce from your area.” VESTAL (WBNG) — This week was Give Back NY Farmers Market Week, an opportunity to thank those who have supported local farmers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Vestal Farmers Market is open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays during the summer and fall. “There are low contact options here,” said market manager Lisa Bloodnick. “You get access to the fresh locally grown produce, keep local dollars circulating in the community.” At the Vestal Farmers Market, vendors were out in full force where organizers teamed up with Binghamton Food Rescue to encourage everyone to mark the occasion by buying farm fresh produce and donating it to local food pantries. Organizers said it’s a continuation of how farmers markets have been providing for their communities, and how their communities have been supporting them throughout the pandemic. For many farmers the pandemic has only made the importance of farmers markets and those who shop at them more clear. last_img read more

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