Kids demonstrated their seriousness

first_imgRe May 2 letter, “Would students still protest on weekend?”: James Curtain asked how many students would turn up if protests were held on a Saturday instead of a school day. The biggest rally so far was held on a Saturday in Washington, D.C. More than a half a million people attended the March for Life on Saturday, March 24. (I even attended at age 69.)Diane Sanders HombachSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Schenectady NAACP calls for school layoff freeze, reinstatement of positionsSchenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesSchenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, music Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

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Easy move to West End unit

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Allied lands last piece of £300m Manchester scheme

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St David’s 2 aiming to put Welsh capital on the retail map

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Kadin Jakarta donates basic medical supplies for battle against COVID-19

first_imgThe capital reported 83 new infections on Friday, raising the number of COVID-19 cases to 598 in total. Fifty-one people have died from the disease in the city so far.Amid the outbreak of the fast-spreading virus, health workers need more and more healthcare supplies, especially protective gear. Donations, therefore, were badly needed, especially for health workers staying at city-owned hotels, said the president director of city-owned hotel manager PT Jakarta Tourisindo’s (Jaktour), Novita Dewi.Read also: Ministry plans to use hotels to house medical workersJakarta Governor Anies Baswedan issued a policy on Thursday to provide a place for doctors and nurses to live while handling COVID-19 cases in hospitals.The administration provided 220 rooms with 414 beds at the Grand Cempaka Business hotel – one of the properties managed by Jaktour – in Central Jakarta’s Cempaka Putih district. More than 300 medical workers are currently put up at the hotel.Novita said the company, which manages several hotels across the capital, had also provided accommodation for 157 medical workers at D’Arcici Alhijra Hotel in the same district.Novita said Jaktour was preparing another hotel, D’Arcici Plumpang in Koja district of North Jakarta, to host health workers from the Tarakan Regional General Hospital in Gambir district, Central Jakarta and Duren Sawit Hospital in Duren Sawit district, East Jakarta.”We definitely need these donations to serve the medical workers staying at our hotels,” Dewi said as she thanked Kadin Jakarta’s for the donation. (dfr)Topics : Read also: Santini Group, Pakarti Yoga Group donate Rp 10b to PMI in battle against COVID-19″We were touched by the governor’s concern about health workers,” Kadin Jakarta chairwoman Diana Dewi said at City Hall on Friday. “Today, we are participating to ease the Jakarta administration’s heavy burden. We hope this can be good charity from all of us.”Jakarta, being the country’s epicenter of the outbreak, has continued to see more medical workers contract the contagious respiratory disease amid reports of a lack of adequate protective gear and supplies.As of Thursday, 50 workers from 24 hospitals across the city had tested positive for the disease and two had died, said the Jakarta administration’s assistant for public welfare, Catur Laswanto. The Jakarta branch of the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Kadin) has donated thousands of items to meet the basic needs of medical workers standing on the front line in the battle against the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19).The donation includes thousands of liters of liquid hand sanitizer, 750 pairs of rubber gloves, 2.5 tons of rice, 500 packs of tinned cake, wheat flour and cooking oil as well as 12 disinfection chambers.Kadin Jakarta handed the assistance over to the Jakarta administration, which will distribute the goods to health workers currently staying at city-owned hotels.last_img read more

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Ardern’s online messages keep spirits up in New Zealand’s lockdown

first_img“I think she communicates really clearly and really well,” John Key, a former prime minister and senior leader of the opposition National Party said on a radio show.While urging New Zealanders to keep to their own “bubble”, or stay home to save lives, Ardern has also talked about working from her office, spending time with family, and even a struggle with toilet training her daughter, who turns two in June.Ardern took the helm of the Labour-led government in October 2017, as the youngest female prime minister at the time, and became only the second elected leader to give birth while in office, after Pakistan’s Benazir Bhutto.Her compassionate yet decisive actions after last year’s mass shooting at two Christchurch mosques drew global praise.But facing domestic criticism for her government’s handling of housing shortages and the economy, Ardern is expected to face a tough re-election contest in September. “This feels like the comfort of being tucked into bed at night by my mum,” said a viewer who responded to the post. “Thanks for checking in with us.”New Zealand’s tally of 589 virus infections, and one death, is far smaller than other countries, such as giant neighbour Australia, which has 4,200 cases and 17 deaths.Thursday’s lockdown is expected to have far-reaching effect on the export-oriented economy of the nation of five million.But the 39-year-old prime minister’s clear communication has garnered praise, even from her fiercest critics. Hours after New Zealand imposed a nationwide lockdown to beat a coronavirus pandemic, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern took to Facebook, livestreaming in a sweater from bed, to “check in” on citizens and tell them of the day’s events.Ardern’s news conferences for more than 30 minutes a day, taking queries, streaming Facebook videos and posting pictures on Instagram, offer a contrast with some world leaders who have stumbled through confusing briefings about virus combat plans.Jacinda Ardern, after announcing very tough nation-wide lockdown measures, is in her jammies on facebook live just “checking in” with her peeps while “we all prepare to hunker down” and it’s the most wholesome, engaging and comforting thing ever.https://t.co/PWp2Tjpr8W— Rohan Leppert (@RohanLeppert) March 25, 2020″I thought I would jump online quickly and check in with everyone…as we all prepare to hunker down for a few weeks,” she said in one of her social media messages, seen and cheered by millions in lockdown.center_img On Instagram on Sunday, she described events in her “bubble”, and was asked how toilet training was going with daughter Neve Te Aroha, who was three months old when she accompanied Ardern at her United Nations debut in 2018.”We are having zero success!” Ardern replied.Topics :last_img read more

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Tiger kills North Sumatra farmer in Mt. Leuser National Park

first_imgA 42-year-old farmer was mauled to death by a Sumatran tiger in the encroached forest area of Mount Leuser National Park in Langkat regency, North Sumatra over the weekend.The farmer, named Ramelan, was found by local people in Pir ADB village, Besitang district on Saturday evening at 11 p.m. in a severe condition.Ramelan was a farmer who lived in the former encroached area located in Sei Lepan district within the National Park. “The victim was mauled by a tiger in the encroached area in the park, the location used to be the habitat of Sumatran tigers,” the park’s spokesman Sudiro told The Jakarta Post on Sunday.Besitang district head Ibnu Hajar confirmed that his resident died in a tiger attack. His office reported the incident to the Langkat regent. The victim’s body was evacuated and laid to rest by his family on Sunday.Pir ADB village chief Ilham Bhakti said Ramelan farmed in areas around Mt. Leuser National Park. He explained that the victim went to his farmland with his partner on Saturday morning. However, he had still not returned home by the evening, prompting local residents to launch a joint search around the Park area. Ilham said the victim was found with severe wounds to his head, hip and thighs.Besitang police chief Adj. Comr. Adi Alfian said that before the incident, several residents had reported that they saw a tiger in the same location where Ramelan’s body was found.“In the afternoon before he was found dead, residents saw a tiger near the farm. We have not seen it again but we will push it back to its habitat to prevent further attacks,” he said.Habitat loss due to deforestation and land encroachment have fueled conflict between humans and the critically endangered big cat on Sumatra island. The Sumatran tiger, the only surviving species of the Sunda Islands tigers, has been listed as critically endangered on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List since 2008. Topics :last_img read more

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Great-grandmother, 97, becomes Brazil’s oldest coronavirus survivor

first_imgWhen 97-year-old Brazilian Gina Dal Colleto was hospitalized on April 1 with coronavirus symptoms, few could have thought she would survive the deadly virus.On Sunday, however, Dal Colleto was pushed in a wheelchair out of Sao Paulo’s Vila Nova Star hospital to applause from doctors and nurses, becoming the oldest known survivor of COVID-19 in Brazil, the Latin American country worst-hit by the outbreak.Her unexpected recovery was a ray of hope in Brazil, where the coronavirus has laid bare a stretched public health system and exposed fierce political debate over how to best tackle the virus’ spread and prop up the country’s economy. The sole survivor of an Italian family comprising 11 siblings, Dal Colleto lived alone in the port city of Santos, Rede D’Or São Luiz, which controls the Vila Nova Star hospital, said in a statement.”Even with almost a century of life, Gina has a very active routine and enjoys walking, shopping and cooking,” the statement said. “She has six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.”While she was hospitalized, Dal Colleto was put on oxygen and admitted to intensive care, the statement said.On Sunday, Brazil’s health ministry said 1,223 people had died as a result of the outbreak, 99 more than the previous day’s total. Brazil now has 22,169 confirmed cases. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right former army captain, has chafed at social distancing measures imposed by state governors and even his own health officials. He wants the economy restarted, arguing that extended shutdowns pose a greater risk than a disease he calls a “little cold.”However, that stance has cost him in the polls and most nights, in cities across Brazil, quarantined Brazilians are banging pots and pans in protest at his handling of the crisis.On Sunday, Bolsonaro said he thought that the coronavirus was on its way out of Brazil, although he gave no explanation. In its place, he added, was coming further unemployment.”It seems that the virus issue is starting to go away, but unemployment is coming … hard. We must fight these two things,” he said in a televised call with religious leaders. center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Gilead could make a profit from COVID-19 drug, analysts say

first_imgGilead Sciences could make a profit on its new treatment for Covid-19 if it costs around $4,500 per patient, according to analysts at Piper Sandler and SVB Leerink.That’s the maximum price that the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review recommended for a 10-day treatment of Gilead’s remdesivir, which received emergency approval from US regulators on Friday. Gilead has so far been quiet on its pricing plans and didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.A number of Wall Street analysts have been getting more cautious on Gilead’s ability to make a profit from remdesivir amid the pandemic, spurring several downgrades last week. The Food and Drug Administration clearance followed results from a US-led study suggesting the drug shortened hospital stays, conflicting with results from China that showed remdesivir had no effect on preventing deaths. At $4,500 per patient, remdesivir “would have a gross margin and overall profit contribution that is below the company’s other products, but not highly dilutive to the company’s future profitability outlook,” Leerink’s Geoffrey Porges wrote in a note to clients Monday.ICER’s estimate rests on remdesivir showing a mortality benefit. The nonprofit agency said if the company is looking to simply recover the costs of producing it, a 10-day treatment regimen should cost about $10. That figure doesn’t include the cost of research and development as remdesivir was previously developed for hepatitis C, ICER said.Gilead is no stranger to drug-pricing debates after political scrutiny over the price of its HIV medicines. The company has said it may spend $1 billion on remdesivir this year.Even after a promise to give away the first 1.5 million vials, the drug could generate more than $2 billion in sales by the end of the year with a $4,500 price tag, according to Piper Sandler analyst Tyler Van Buren. And “several billion in sales are easily achievable” with the number of hospitalized Covid-19 patients remaining high for the foreseeable future.Topics :last_img read more

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Garuda opens dialogue with sukuk holders as it struggles to pay dues

first_img“We offer three options and we have talked with our sukuk holders about how to deal with the situation. Hopefully, there will be a solution to this matter,” he told the press during a virtual briefing on Monday. Garuda Indonesia issued US$496.8 million in global sukuk on June 3, 2015, with a five-year tenure and an annual return of 5.95 percent, according to the company’s financial report released in September last year.However, the airline has struggled to maintain its cashflow with the number of flights nosediving due to the implementation of large scale social restrictions across the country and the imposition of travel bans by various countries to contain the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.Garuda Indonesia recently sent a letter to its sukuk holders on the repayment. In the letter dated April 29, which was signed by Garuda finance director Fuad Rizal, the company admitted that the pandemic had created an extremely challenging business environment for the airline. “In response to this, the company has been taking measures to ensure the well-being of its staff and customers while managing liquidity proactively amid the uncertainty the airline industry currently faces. The company continues to assess all its options to remain a going concern, in particular in relation to its sukuk due in June 2020,” stated Garuda. Garuda Indonesia has also appointed PJT Partners to facilitate the discussion between the airline and bond holders to find a solution to the problem. Apart from the negotiations, Irfan revealed during a hearing with lawmakers on April 27 that Garuda was considering taking out bank loans to help the company repay the sukuk.Read also: Indonesian air carriers report sharp decline in cargo trafficThe COVID-19 crisis has dealt a severe blow to Garuda and airlines around the world with the aviation industry recording a sharp decline in passenger numbers and revenue since February.According to presentation materials made available to lawmakers, Garuda estimates it suffered a 31.9 percent decline in passenger and cargo revenue in the first quarter compared to the same period last year. The COVID-19 crisis has also forced Garuda to ground 100 of its 142 aircraft.Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati said on Monday that only 70 flights were scheduled daily across the entire the country, down from 79,000 daily flights before the virus outbreak.Topics : National flag carrier Garuda Indonesia is reaching out to the holders of its sukuk to hold a discussion on repayments due in June as the airline struggles to maintain cashflow amid the turbulence caused by the COVID-19 outbreak.Garuda president director Irfan Setiaputra said every time a sukuk due date was approaching, a company had three options to consider: repayment with a discount, full repayment or a payment extension.Read also: Garuda, ‘severely affected’ by COVID-19, may restructure bonds: Ministerlast_img read more

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