Linzi Hateley Will Return to London’s Mamma Mia

first_img View Comments Linzi Hateley in ‘Mamma Mia’ This dancing queen will dance again on the West End stage! Linzi Hateley will return to the role of Donna Sheridan in the hit ABBA musical Mamma Mia! at London’s Novello Theatre beginning on June 13.Also joining Hateley are Sanne Den Besten (Les Misérables) as Sophie Sheridan, Richard Carson (Miss Saigon) as Sky, Dugald Bruce-Lockhart (The Three Lions) as Bill, Jemma Revell as Ali, Amy Webb as Lisa, Filippo Coffano as Pepper and Jake Small as Eddie, with Sorelle Marsh playing the role of Donna Sheridan at certain performances. They will be joining Mazz Murray as Tanya, Jo Napthine as Rosie, Richard Trinder as Sam and Alasdair Harvey as Harry.New to the ensemble will be Felipe Bejarano, Tabitha Camburn, Georgina Castle, Edward Chitticks, Louise Dalton, Ben Darcy, Rebecca Giacopazzi, Katy Hards, Jennifer Hepburn, Robert Knight, Rebecca McKinnis, Samira Mighty and Amy West, who will be joining Adam Clayton-Smith, Stephen John Davis, Craig Anthony Kelly, George Miller and Robbie Scotcher.Hateley has played the character twice before, from 2007 to 2009 and in 2010. Her other recent theatre credits include the national tour of Barnum, London Road and Les Misérables.last_img read more

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Broadway Balances America Invites You to Meet Deborah Cox in The Bodyguard

first_img View Comments Deborah Cox in ‘The Bodyguard’ Broadway Balances Americacenter_img We hope you’ve been saving all your love for this moment! Broadway Balances America, the special six-part series airing on The Balancing Act on Lifetime Television, continues its third season on November 21 (the episode will re-air on November 28) with an exclusive look at the touring production of The Bodyguard musical, starring Deborah Cox. Tune in as The Balancing Act takes viewers behind the scenes of the new musical, which kicks off its touring production on January 10.In this episode, correspondent Amber Milt sits down with Grammy-nominated R&B superstar Deborah Cox, as she discusses a life-long career in the entertainment business, juggling family and work, and what life is like on the road. Deborah will also talk about what it has been like to step into the role of Rachel Marron and sing such powerful and iconic songs.Based on the smash hit film, The Bodyguard is a breathtakingly romantic thriller, featuring a host of irresistible classics including “Queen of the Night,” “So Emotional,” “One Moment in Time,” “Saving All My Love,” “Run to You,” “I Have Nothing,” “I Wanna Dance with Somebody” and one of the biggest selling songs of all time—”I Will Always Love You.”Visit the official Broadway Balances America website to discover more about this exciting series and to find out which Broadway musicals will also be featured!last_img read more

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London’s In the Heights Announces Closing Date

first_img In the Heights View Comments Lin-Manuel Miranda’s In the Heights has announced that it will close in London on January 8, 2017. Directed by Luke Sheppard, with choreography by Drew McOnie, the Tony-winning musical has been running at the King’s Cross Theatre since the fall of 2015.In the Heights is an uplifting and exhilarating journey into Washington Heights, one of Manhattan’s most vibrant communities—a place where the coffee is light and sweet, the windows are always open and the breeze carries the rhythm of three generations of music. It’s a community on the brink of change, full of hopes, dreams and pressures, where the biggest struggle can be deciding which traditions to take with you, and which ones to leave behind.Conceived by Miranda, with music and lyrics by Miranda and a book by Quiara Alegría Hudes, the production currently stars Sam Mackay as Usnavi, Gabriela Garcia as Nina, Sarah Naudi as Vanessa, Damian Buhagiar as Sonny and David Bedella as Kevin. Related Showscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 9, 2011 Gabriela Garcia in ‘In the Heights'(Photo: Gabriela Garcia)last_img read more

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Billy Harrigan Tighe Will Star as J.M. Barrie in the Finding Neverland Tour

first_img View Comments Raise your voice in cheer! Broadway favorite Billy Harrigan Tighe will star as J.M. Barrie in the national tour of Finding Neverland. Tighe, who’s taking over for Kevin Kern, will begin performances in the touring production of the Broadway.com Audience Choice Award-winning musical on February 7 at the SHN Orpheum Theatre in San Francisco.Tighe’s recent credits include Pippin on Broadway, Elder Price in The Book of Mormon in the West End and national tour, and as Fiyero in Wicked.In addition to Tighe, the cast of the Finding Neverland tour includes Christine Dwyer as Sylvia Llewelyn Davies, Tom Hewitt as Charles Froman/Captain Hook, Karen Murphy as Mrs. Du Maurier and Jordan Cole, Finn Faulconer, Tyler Patrick Hennessy, Ben Krieger, Colin Wheeler and Mitchell Wray as the Llewelyn Davies boys.Based on the Oscar-winning Miramax motion picture by David Magee, and the play The Man Who Was Peter Pan by Allan Knee, Finding Neverland follows the relationship between playwright J.M. Barrie and the family that inspired Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up.Finding Neverland features direction by Tony Award winner Diane Paulus, a book by Olivier Award nominee James Graham, music and lyrics by Gary Barlow and Grammy Award winner Eliot Kennedy, and choreography by Emmy Award winner Mia Michaels. Billy Harrigan Tighelast_img read more

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Trees Bearing Gifts

first_imgWeeding. “Mulches help control weeds,” he said. “That provides two advantages: One, youdon’t have to pull weeds yourself. And two, you don’t have to spray chemical herbicidesaround your yard.” Watering. “Sunshine and wind will take away much less water if the soil surface is coveredwith mulch,” Garber said. Reduce water needs with pine straw mulch around shrubs and inflower beds. Replenish. Don’t replace. Just add new straw on top of the old to make a layer at least two tothree inches thick. That’s the least it will take to be effective. You could be happy you saved it next spring; for all the reasons it’s so good in yourlandscape, pine straw can be just as valuable as a mulch in your vegetable garden. “In most cases,” Garber said, “pine straw that’s two inches deep after it settles does 90 percentof what you’d expect the fabric or plastic liner to do. Four or five inches of fresh straw willsettle to about two inches.” Don’t just stuff it under the branches. Spread it beyond the drip line, the line right underthe outermost leaves. “Getting it over the feeder roots is the key,” Garber said. Yes, somebody has to rake it all up. But pine straw can be more of a blessing than a chore,said Mel Garber, a horticulturist with the University of Georgia Extension Service. Don’t remove the old pine straw. “One of the benefits of mulching is the organic matter itadds to the soil as it decomposes,” he said. Don’t pile it too thick. “I don’t know that it will hurt so much,” Garber said. “But any morethan about six inches just won’t do any more good.” Pine straw can free you, he said, from having to do so much: “If you use it right, pine straw can actually help you have less yard work to do,” Garber said. Pine straw actually falls year-round, said extension forester Dave Moorhead. But needle-fall isheaviest in fall, winter and early spring. If you have more pine straw than you can use in the fall, just find an out-of-the-way place topile it up and save it. If you think of all it can do, you’ll thank those pines for the pine straw they’re raining intoyour yard. It can also help keep soil from washing from heavy rains, Garber said. That protects waterquality and keeps you from having to repair eroded areas. Here are some tips, Garber said, to help make the most of your pine straw. Mulch young trees. “It’s really important in the first two or three years,” he said. “Withshallow-rooted trees like dogwood or redbud or crape myrtle it’s good to mulch even afterthat.” Don’t push it up close to the stems. Especially with azaleas, he said, mulch piled up aroundthe stems can lead a second root system to develop. That often happens at the expense of thedeeper root system, which leaves the azalea even more susceptible to drought damage. Mowing. Contoured pine straw islands, with just a few plants, can replace large areas ofhigh-maintenance lawn. “Where you already have groups of shrubs or trees, use pine straw totie them together,” Garber said. “Then you won’t have to mow around them individually.” Don’t put plastic or landscape fabric under the straw unless your main purpose is completeweed control. If that’s the case, you won’t need as thick a layer of straw. It can help keep the soil moist in small gardens, raised bed gardens or small beds of vegetableplantings. It can also be good for mulching small fruits, such as strawberries or blueberries.last_img read more

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Meat Meet.

first_imgMicrobiology of sanitation.Costs of spoilage.Danger of food-borne hazards and emerging pathogens.Roles of engineering, plant layout, construction materials, refrigeration and ventilation. Food safety is on shoppers’ minds more than ever. So the American Meat Science Association has scheduled a training for meat and poultry processors Nov. 29-30 in Athens, Ga.”Improving Your Sanitation Program” will begin at 7:45 a.m. Nov. 29 at the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. It will offer two full days of timely classes in a comprehensive course developed with help from University of Georgia and Virginia Tech food scientists. To process food products of the highest quality possible, the course will address the:center_img A $395 fee covers materials, luncheons, a reception and refreshment breaks. To learn more, contact your UGA Extension Service county office. Or call Estes Reynolds at (706) 542-2574 or Norman Marriott at (540) 231-7640.last_img read more

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Shoe boxes for soldiers

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaSoldiers in “Operation Iraqi Freedom” from Georgia’s Fort Stewartand Hunter Army Air Field will soon get shoe boxes from homethrough the efforts of 4-H’ers in, interestingly enough, LibertyCounty.The shoe boxes are filled with much-needed personal care items,not shoes.”Our soldiers have food and medical supplies,” said DeniseEverson, a University of Georgia Extension Service 4-H agent inLiberty County and coordinator of the statewide project.Soldiers need sunscreen, chapstick”Those things are obviously government issued,” she said. “Whatthey need are things like sunscreen, Chap Stick and toiletriesthat most of us take for granted here at home.”Everson has firsthand knowledge of what U.S. soldiers need. FortStewart is just a mile and a half from her office, and 75 percentof her 4-H’ers have a parent in the military.”We are a military community,” she said. “This project hit closeto home for us and for our kids. We all know someone who is awayfrom home because of the war. For me, it’s my boss (Robert Bell,UGA Extension agriculture agent AG AGENT OR COUNTY EXTENSIONCOORDINATOR? in Liberty C county), who’s stationed at FortStewart preparing reserve units for deployment to Iraq.”She says local soldiers are sending stories home about how”really, really cold; really, really sandy; and really, reallyhot” the conditions are in Iraq.”They’re also requesting soft bathroom tissue from home, which isa lot different from the government-issued tissue they get,”Everson chuckled.The soldiers also need handheld computer games and toiletrieslike toothpaste, deodorant and soap.”The computer games are to help them pass the downtime that wedon’t see on news coverage,” she said. A community project that became a statewide projectThe shoe box project began in March as the Liberty County 4-H’erscommunity service project for the month. Lori Purcell, programdevelopment coordinator for Georgia’s Central District 4-HOffice, was instrumental in transforming the project into astatewide 4-H project. As word of the project spread, studentsfrom across the state joined in to collect boxes in theircounties, too.On May 22, more than 400 shoe boxes were delivered to FortStewart’s Army Community Services. And, over the past two months,more than 2,000 individual items have been delivered to ArmyCommunity Services and Southern Smiles, a nonprofit organizationin the Savannah, Ga., home of Hunter. Army Community Services andSouthern Smiles will make sure the boxes reach their intendeddestination.”The shoe boxes are the perfect size, as they can be put onsupply planes as there’s room, a few here and a few there,” saidEverson.”Medical and military supplies are obviously the toppriority. With this project, we know the boxes are going to getto soldiers. And they’re our soldiers.”It’s not too late to participate in the shoe box project. If youare interested, contact Everson at (912)876-2133. Or e-mail herdeverson@uga.edu.”Most people are beginning to view the war as being over,”Everson said. “In military communities like ours, we know thereality.(The soldiers) are still on a peace-keeping mission, andmany will continue to be assigned to Iraq for the next five to 10years.”Everson said the first wave of soldiers are expected to return toLiberty County in late summer, although no official dates havebeen announced at this time.Next, Georgia’s middle school 4-H’ers plan to write letters toGeorgia soldiers.”At our fall retreat, each 4-H’er will get a name of a soldier towrite to,” Everson said.”And we know the soldiers will write backand send pictures. Some soldiers never get mail. This will reallymeet that need.”last_img read more

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EPA funds turf projects

first_imgAlumnus support led to grantLandry said the Georgia-North Carolina EPA grant was madepossible by the efforts of the Georgia Turfgrass Association, theNorth Carolina Turfgrass Council and a UGA alumnus.”The main individual who made this grant possible is Sam Lang, aUGA CAES graduate,” Landry said. A native of Swainsboro Ga., Lang now owns a professional lawn carecompany in Raleigh, N.C. “Since he graduated, Sam has kept inclose contact with our college,” Landry said. “He relied on ourExtension specialists for recommendations when he worked in theAtlanta area. He has also helped recruit students for our collegeand served as a guest lecturer in turfgrass classes.”The urban agriculture industry in Georgia, which includesturfgrass, provides more than 79,000 jobs and annuallygenerates more than $8.1 billion to the state’seconomy. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaUniversity of Georgia and North Carolina State Universityresearchers have received more than $650,000 in grant funds fromthe Environmental Protection Agency for turfgrass research intheir home states.In Georgia, the grant will be used over the next two years tofund eight turfgrass research projects in the UGA College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences. Less inputs, impact on environment”All of these projects relate to turfgrass’ overall environmentalimpact on our state,” Landry said. “Our main objective is to lookat improving sustainability of turfgrass management in ourenvironment. We know that turfgrasses can significantly improve the environment in many ways. We are constantly examining ways to produce healthy turfgrass using the least amount of inputs.”Turfgrasses reduce soil erosion, and improve water quality in the process, Landry said. Turfgrasses also absorb carbon dioxide and other harmful gases while releasing oxygen and cooling the environment.Industry leaders, like Georgia Turfgrass Association Past-President Ken Morrow, look forward to reaping the benefits of theresults of the new research projects.”The main benefit I see is the project will identifysustainable turfgrass systems for climates in this region,”Morrow, president of Sod Atlanta, said. “I also see the benefitsof identifying the potential enhancements to the environment thatturfgrass provides, such as errosion control and generalenvironmental enhancement.”center_img Industry, consumers will benefit”These funds are allowing us to do projects that we would not beable to do otherwise,” said Gil Landry, coordinator of theGeorgia Center for Urban Agriculture on the UGA campus inGriffin, Ga. “Each research project we complete directly impactsturfgrass professionals and most will also impact individual homeowners in the state.”The grant will fund UGA Seashore Paspalum turfgrass breedingefforts. Seashore paspalum can be irrigated using a wide qualityrange of water, including seawater, brackish water and recycledwater. The grass needs only minimal pesticides and judiciousapplications of fertilizers.UGA scientists also plan to use the grant funds to investigatealternative methods of turfgrass insect control, theenvironmental fate of pesticides used on turfgrass, turfgrassdisease control, environmental management of turfgrass and usingturfgrass for erosion control.UGA agricultural economists will study economic value of the industry and individual lawns to property owners.last_img read more

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Distracted Driving Prevention Summit

first_imgTwo Bleckley County 4-H members hope to educate their friends and community members about the dangers of distracted driving. Trevor Barker, a high school senior, and high school sophomore Jade Allen will travel to the 2014 Teen Distracted Driving Prevention Summit, hosted by the National Organization for Youth Safety, in Washington, D.C., Oct. 18 to Oct. 20. The two 4-H’ers were chosen from hundreds of national applicants to attend the event.“They were so ecstatic,” said Brandi McGonagill, Bleckley County Extension 4-H agent. “They posted it all over social media.”The Bleckley County 4-H students will be working alongside more than 20 students from across the country to learn how to engage their community and warn fellow teens about the dangers of distracted driving.Any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving is classified as “distracted driving.” Ten percent of all drivers under the age of 20 involved in fatal crashes were distracted at the time of the crash, and this age group has the largest proportion of distracted drivers.“These deaths are preventable,” said National Organizations for Youth Safety CEO Anita Boles in a press release. “Teens are especially prone to distractions. However, peer-to-peer education — led by youth — can save lives.”The upcoming distracted driving summit will feature presentations, educational activities and interactive training. The three-day summit will also feature four different panels: a distracted driving data/research panel, impact panel, parent influence panel and youth voice panel.The panels will focus on answering questions about teen brain development and distractions, how victims impact families and communities, and how affected individuals can inspire change.“It’s a great opportunity for them to go to D.C., learn more about distracted driving and bring it back to our community,” McGonagill said. Barker and Allen will bring back the information and resources they receive from the summit and host a local distracted driving prevention program, replicating the summit and its programming.Barker is also on the student council at Bleckley County High School with plans to study medicine after graduation. Allen also stays busy with FFA, dance and showing horses.While in the nation’s capital, the two will meet with legislators and tour historic sites and memorials in addition to attending the summit.(Jordan Hill is an intern with the UGA Tifton Campus.)last_img read more

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International Ag Reception

first_imgKanemasu Global Engagement AwardThis award recognizes a student who goes above and beyond in internationalizing his/her academic program at UGA.Jillian Gordon, master’s degree candidate in agricultural and environmental education CAES Global Citizen AwardThis award recognizes an undergraduate student in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences who has embraced global citizenship through participation, promotion and leadership of international initiatives during his/her collegiate career.Lynae Bresser, pursuing a bachelor’s degree in environmental economics and managementAg Abroad Photo ContestThis contest is open to all CAES students and encourages them to share images of agriculture from around the world.First place, Martina Buchholz, Indian Mustard Field — IndiaSecond place, Ali Halalipour, Paddy Field Goes Beyond All Restrictions — IranThird place, Amanda Miller, Passion, It’s Universal — UruguayTo view all of the photos in the contest please visit tinyurl.com/internationalAGphotos16.For more information about the CAES Office of Global Programs www.global.uga.edu For all the photos from this year’s reception visit tiny.cc/caesglobal16. From rice fields in western Africa to sheep pastures in Uruguay, students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental sciences travel the world each year to learn how to build a more food-secure future. This international engagement not only builds their understanding of global agricultural systems, but also helps students make connections between their classroom education and the global goal of doubling the world’s food supply by 2050. Sam Pardue, dean and director of CAES, challenged the students gathered at the college’s International Agriculture Reception to finish the job started during the green revolution in the 1960s and 1970s. Because of improved crop varieties and planting practices, farmers reduced the percentage the of the world population who suffer hunger from one-third of the human population to one-tenth of the population between the 1970s and the 1990s. “I’m excited by many of you in this room who will be a part of the next green revolution,” Pardue said. “And one day, just like we’ve eradicated diseases, we will be able to eradicate hunger from this world. It’s a mission that we all can embrace, and I am looking forward to seeing what the next 20 or 30 years of your efforts will bring.” CAES faculty, students and administrators gathered Tuesday to celebrate the college’s international mission and accomplishments at the sixth annual International Agriculture Day reception. Keynote speaker Ann M. Steensland, deputy director of the Global Harvest Initiative, told students and faculty that successful solutions for feeding the world’s hungry have to be created in concert with the farmers and community members on the ground in developing countries and in our own backyard. “As we’re looking at meeting the challenge of 2050, we need to think locally as well as globally,” Steensland said. “We need think creatively. We need to be flexible and we need to listen as much as we talk. And if we do that, and we really work with and respect the people we’re working with in the field, I think we have a real chance to meet this challenge and to bring a lot of people along with us.” The students and faculty members gathered at Tuesday’s event exemplified this idea of global citizenship and cooperation. The CAES Office of Global Programs, which hosts the International Agriculture Day Reception each spring, honored some of the college’s most globally minded students with travel grants, scholarships and awards. Students who will graduate this year with UGA’s International Agriculture Certificate were also recognized.Students honored Tuesday include:International Agriculture Certificate International Agriculture Certificate students expand their global perspective by participating in internationally focused coursework, language study and a hands-on international internship aligned with their academic and career goals.Brock Boleman, master’s degree in agricultural and applied economicsErin Burnett, bachelor’s degree in agricultural communicationChris Reynolds, bachelor’s degree in agribusinessEmily Urban, master’s degree in agricultural and environmental educationRachel Wigington, master’s degree in agricultural leadershipJessica Wolf, bachelor’s degree in geography William A. Corbett Purpose and Passion ScholarshipThis award is given by Jean Corbett Fowler in memory of her father, William A. Corbett, and supports graduate student participation in international education, internship or research experience.Alexander Morán Chávez, master’s degree candidate in agricultural and environmental educationcenter_img Graduate International Travel Awards These awards will be used to fund an international activity that supports the student’s interest in international collaboration and in global issues. The award covers round-trip air fair to an international conference or research site.Diego Barcellos, doctoral degree candidate in soil scienceAlexandra Bentz, doctoral degree candidate in poultry scienceEmily Urban, master’s degree candidate in agricultural and environmental educationlast_img read more

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