Allison Williams Talks Peter Pan Live! & that Short, Short Hair

first_imgThis morning, we got our first look at Allison Williams in her latest role: the boy who never grew up in NBC’s forthcoming Peter Pan Live!. The Girls star chatted with The Today Show in the midst of final callbacks for the supporting cast. “It’s an absolute dream come true,” she said. “It’s so fun already; I can only imagine what the next couple of weeks and months are going to bring.” And of course, she has the Sound of Music mega-rating numbers on her mind: “We’re hoping for just a few, just a modest 20 or so million.” And what about that hair?! She revealed that although she “sort of very tentatively offered to cut my hair,” the head-turning pixie-cut is, in fact, a wig. Catch Williams (and the wig) alongside Christopher Walken and possibly Christian Borle on December 4! View Commentslast_img read more

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Broadway Balances America Invites You to Meet Deborah Cox in The Bodyguard

first_img View Comments Deborah Cox in ‘The Bodyguard’ Broadway Balances Americacenter_img We hope you’ve been saving all your love for this moment! Broadway Balances America, the special six-part series airing on The Balancing Act on Lifetime Television, continues its third season on November 21 (the episode will re-air on November 28) with an exclusive look at the touring production of The Bodyguard musical, starring Deborah Cox. Tune in as The Balancing Act takes viewers behind the scenes of the new musical, which kicks off its touring production on January 10.In this episode, correspondent Amber Milt sits down with Grammy-nominated R&B superstar Deborah Cox, as she discusses a life-long career in the entertainment business, juggling family and work, and what life is like on the road. Deborah will also talk about what it has been like to step into the role of Rachel Marron and sing such powerful and iconic songs.Based on the smash hit film, The Bodyguard is a breathtakingly romantic thriller, featuring a host of irresistible classics including “Queen of the Night,” “So Emotional,” “One Moment in Time,” “Saving All My Love,” “Run to You,” “I Have Nothing,” “I Wanna Dance with Somebody” and one of the biggest selling songs of all time—”I Will Always Love You.”Visit the official Broadway Balances America website to discover more about this exciting series and to find out which Broadway musicals will also be featured!last_img read more

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Colombian Military Destroys Four Drug Labs

first_imgBy Myriam Ortega/Diálogo February 14, 2017 Colombian Marines, together with the Army and National Police, seized four drug labs in the Department of Putumayo on January 17th. Criminals used these crude facilities to process cocaine base. The soldiers carried out two operations, the first of which was led by the 30th Battalion in Puerto Guzmán, where three homemade labs were found, and the second by the 33rd Battalion in San Miguel municipality, where they found the fourth processing center. “This effort has been carried out through ongoing operations,” said Colonel Ricardo Alberto Suárez Rátiva, commander of the 3rd Marine Brigade, under whose command is the 33rd Battalion, which leads the operation. He attributes their success to “human and signals intelligence, which is how these illegal activities are able to be detected.” Inside the labs, the Marines found 997 gallons of liquid ingredients and 680 kilograms of dry supplies meant for processing cocaine base. The authorities carried out a controlled destruction of the materials on-site. In press releases, the Colombian Navy indicated that “in 2016, the Southern Naval Force moved ahead with a standing offensive against this scourge in its jurisdiction, destroying 145 processing centers, over 57 million gallons of liquid ingredients, and 32,000 kilograms of dry supplies.” In 2017, 10 of those labs have already been disabled. Teamwork Col. Suárez attributes the success of this and other missions to the Colombian Armed Forces’ teamwork. “The Third Brigade has four tactical units, meaning four battalions. We carry out operations with Army units, according to the sector of the river where they are located. Since I command one of the Marine Corps’ brigades, I have responsibility for the rivers, which depending on the sector can be the Putumayo, the Caquetá, or the Caguán River. These actions are performed by Army units, with the support of the Air Force, in order to ensure resounding success.” According to Army General Adolfo Hernández, such joint action starts from the very moment of formation of each military detachment. He commands the 27th Jungle Brigade, which has jurisdiction over the department of Putumayo and Bota Caucana. “Something that helps to reinforce this culture of joint action within the different service branches is Proyecto Púrpura (Project Purple), which was instituted in the various service academies for the purpose of getting students to interact together early on in their careers. Today we have members from the other service branches in the Army, Naval, and Air Force academies. There they create teamwork opportunity spaces, and later we see those results reflected in the theater of operations.” The skills brought by each corps are added together, resulting in the optimization of resources, Gen. Hernández added. “Our teamwork has facilitated joint efforts, and through teamwork, we have saved resources. The creation of intelligence bubbles — where all branches bring to the table information about a given target, such as drug trafficking, as well as other potential targets that we may confront — has also been important. In that space, each committee contributes its understanding of how an operation could be carried out and whether it calls for execution by a single service branch, so that resources are more efficiently and forcefully used in meeting the objective.” Coca in Putumayo According to the “Monitoring Report on Territories Affected by Illicit Crops” in Colombia, a study by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), 64 percent of coca crops detected as of December 31, 2015, are concentrated in the departments of Nariño, Putumayo, and Norte de Santander. At the time, 20,068 hectares in Putumayo were used for the cultivation of coca. In the face of such a daunting challenge “the goal is to keep carrying out operations and this involves constant, ongoing searches of the river area under our brigade’s responsibility — the Caquetá, Putumayo, Cagüán, Ortegüaza, Mecaya, and Sencella rivers — where our operations are appropriately conducted,” Col. Suárez added. “The Colombian Army has excellent relations with the Ecuadorian, Peruvian, and Brazilian armies. We remain in constant contact for carrying out coordinated military operations, and here in Colombia, those efforts aid us in our fight against various transnational crimes taking place on our borders. Here in Putumayo, we have two legal border crossings, where people from Puerto Leguizamo and San Miguel can cross. But along the length of the Putumayo River, the Colombian, Ecuadorian, and Peruvian marines conduct ongoing surveillance, coordinate certain operations when they have information about a crime along the border, and take coordinated action against it,” Gen. Hernández reiterated.last_img read more

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Court acts on fee multipliers

first_imgCourt acts on fee multipliers Court acts on fee multipliers November 15, 2003 Regular Newscenter_img Contingency fee multipliers cannot be used when awarding reasonable attorneys’ fees under F.S. §768.79, the Florida Supreme Court said in an October 2 opinion.In case no. SC02-428, the court reviewed Allstate Insurance Co. v. Sarkis, 809 So. 2d 6 (Fla. 5th DCA 2001), a case in which the petitioner was involved in an automobile accident in which she suffered damages. The plaintiff offered, under F.S. §768.79, which considers reasonableness of attorneys’ fees after an offer of judgment has been made, to accept $10,000 under her uninsured motorist coverage. The offer was rejected; the case went to trial; and the plaintiff was ultimately awarded $87,700.Since the verdict exceeded the offer by more than 25 percent, under the statute the trial court awarded attorneys’ fees of $58,450. After noting that Allstate had a regular practice of contesting such claims and other factors in court, the judge then applied a 1.5 multiplier factor.In its 6-1 opinion, the court agreed with an en banc ruling of the Fifth District Court of Appeal that the multiplier was not allowed under the statute, or under Rule 1.442, Florida Rules of Civil Procedure, which explains attorneys’ fees are sanctions after an offer of judgment has been refused.In his concurring opinion, Justice Charles T. Wells made the argument that: “Counsel agreed to the representation of the client and entered into a contract with the client for the representation prior to the offer of judgment.. . [hence] justifying a fee multiplier, which is whether a fee enhancement is required to obtain competent counsel, cannot be met because when an offer of judgment is made and rejected, counsel has already been obtained.”Justice Wells continued that Rule 1.442 states that attorneys’ fees are sanctions that can only be applied after the date the offer of judgment was served upon the rejecting party, not from the original date the counsel agreed to undertake the representation.Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead and Justices Fred Lewis, Peggy Quince, and Kenneth Bell concurred in the per curiam opinion, and Bell also concurred with Wells’ concurring opinion.In dissenting, Justice Barbara Pariente stated that the language of F.S. §768.79 clearly places multiplier fees within the category of “all relevant criteria” considered when calculating award of attorneys’ fees, arguing that multiplier fees supported the underlying policy of the statute, to promote settlements.“The use of the contingency risk factor.. . serves the goals of both ensuring access to the courts by potential litigants and encouraging settlement of claims,” she said.Justice Pariente also argued that F.S. §768.79 did allow for using a multiplier.“The court has adopted a forced, rather than a strict, construction of an unambiguous statute in rejecting the contingent nature of the representation as one of the ‘relevant criteria’ in determining the reasonableness of a fee award under F.S. §768.79 (7)(b). Strict construction in favor of a party receiving a sanction is required only when the statutory language being construed is ambiguous. . . therefore, in my view, the majority’s act of excluding a contingency risk multiplier from consideration as a relevant criterion is an unwarranted exercise in statutory construction.”For more information on SC02-428, visit the court’s Web site, www.flcourts.org.last_img read more

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The weirdest thing I did to save money

first_imgby: Christina LavingiaPersonal finance experts are in the business of helping readers save money every day. Although not every tip can apply to every reader, there is a shared goal of imparting financial wisdom to others to help them cope with debt, improve their credit, successfully obtain a home and accomplish a number of other financially based goals. It’s definitely possible to take frugality too far, however, and the quest to save money can quickly turn from the wise to the weird.We asked 30 major bloggers and personal finance experts to share both the most bizarre things they’ve ever done to save money — and the lessons they learned through the experience.1. I Scrounged in the Lost and Found for a Free Swimsuit“I don’t consider it weird, but others I’ve told about this incident find it cringe-worthy,” Jeff Yeager, the Ultimate Cheapskate, said. “I checked into a hotel once, only to realize that they had a swimming pool and I didn’t bring a bathing suit. The clerk at the desk suggested that I buy one at the mall next door. Grimacing, I asked if instead they perhaps had a suit in my size in their lost and found. She proudly produced a nice-looking swimsuit in just my size, and said that I could keep it when I was through, since it had been in their lost and found for more than 30 days. It’s still my favorite suit. Lesson: It never hurts to ask.” continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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4 paths lead to being an authentic leader

first_img 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » There are myriad habits to adopt and steps to follow to become a better leader, and while I like these lists and try and adhere to many of their suggestions, sometimes it’s necessary to go back to the basics and review what being an authentic leader should really look like.Peter Himmelman, Forbes contributor, recently listed “four pathways to authentic leadership.” These four paths are meant to help refocus leaders on true leadership. The list includes:Honesty. “Authentic leadership insists that we don’t distort reality,” Himmelman writes. He adds that a big part of honesty is readily admitting when we’re wrong.Empathy. We must care for the well-being of others more than ourselves, which Himmelman writes, requires “a rewiring of our brains, a retraining of our minds and habits.”last_img read more

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No ‘mudik’ ban for Idul Adha, Transportation Minister says

first_imgThere will be no ban on mudik (exodus) during Idul Adha (Day of Sacrifice) this year despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Transportation Ministry Budi Karya Sumadi said on Tuesday.Budi said he had asked all transportation operators to enforce safety and health protocols established by the national COVID-19 task force circular on travel requirements.“We’re striving to build public trust to feel confident using public transportation such as buses, trains, planes and ships,” he said in a press release published on Tuesday. The recent COVID-19 task force circular on travel stipulated that domestic travelers using public transportation were required to show negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or rapid test results in a test taken no more than 14 days before the day of travel. Alternatively, travelers could show a symptom-free testimonial from a doctor if COVID-19 testing was not available in their area. The regulation requires travelers to install the PeduliLindungi surveillance app, used to trace and track suspected carriers of the virus as well as confirmed COVID-19 patients on their mobile phones.The minister urged the public to obey other health protocols, such as wearing face masks and face shields, maintaining physical distance and frequent hand washing and hand sanitizer use.He also instructed employees of the ministry to anticipate a spike in vehicle and passenger traffic as the Idul Adha holiday approached. The holiday is expected to begin on Friday.“We have taken anticipatory measures at transportation nodes, on national roads and toll roads and in tourist areas where we predict increased vehicle flow because of the long weekend on Friday, Saturday and Sunday,” Budi said.Topics :last_img read more

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Two new property taxes if Labor wins according to election costings

first_imgMore from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus23 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market23 hours agoProperty Council Queensland head Chris Mountford. Picture: Mark CallejaMr Mountford said the Property Council had expressed concern six weeks ago over the Valuer-General’s decision not to revalue some of the state’s most significant local government areas including Brisbane in 2018.“With a big new tax to be imposed on properties above $10 million, it is now clear why the Government is keen to lock in valuations issued at the peak of the market.“These inflated valuations, coupled with a 2.5 per cent land tax surcharge, will deliver the Government far more than its fair share of taxes from the industry.”He warned that property owners were still being slugged with the 0.5 per cent ‘temporary’ land tax surcharge introduced in 2009.Mr Mountford said the current Labor government had already broke promises over not introducing any new taxes, fees or charges when it brought in a new tax on foreign buyers last year.“This year, the Government broke its promise again when it introduced a further new tax on absentee landholders. Capital is mobile. If we keep pushing up the costs of investing here, ultimately another part of the globe will become a more attractive place to invest, and the money and associated jobs will be redirected,” he said.“Queensland is not just competing with southern states. Like in cricket, we are competing with the rest of the world. Make no mistake- taxes on business and investment are ultimately taxes that will be borne by Queenslanders.” Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk had two new property taxes in her election costings released two days before voting day. Picture: AAP Image/Tracey NearmyTHE Property Council has launched a scathing attack on the Labor Party’s decision to slug property owners with two new taxes if it wins come Saturday.Council Queensland executive director Chris Mountford warned the party led by Annastacia Palaszczuk was playing a dangerous game by introducing new taxes.“The introduction of four, big new taxes – two of them on property – were of course going to raise the ire of the industry. What better way to hide them than to release them two days out from the election, while the Ashes are underway?”A new 2.25 per cent land tax on large non-farm property holdings for individuals and 2.5 per cent for non-individuals including trusts was expected to net $227m off owners, plus a doubling of the transfer duty charges on foreign buyers – to 7 per cent from 3 – was expected to add $99m in property costs over three years.last_img read more

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Neuroscientist: Sex differences crucial in evaluating medication

first_imgStuff co.nz 29 January 2015Recent research showing the different effects of medicines on men and women could lead to big changes in the way drugs are assessed and prescribed.Animals used in laboratory tests are typically only male – and Victoria University neuroscientist Gina Grimshaw says this may have led to crucial data being missed on how new drugs affect men and women differently.Writing in the New Zealand Science Review, she cited research into the sleeping pill Ambien, also known as zolpidem. After being on the market for 20 years, Ambien was found to build up in the blood of women far more than it did men.It also had startling differences in side-effects, leaving women more tired and less able to concentrate. The recommended dose for female patients was consequently halved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA).More recent research has also revealed variations in male and female reactions to an ADHD and hypertension medication and, in some studies, cholesterol-reducing statins.http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/65526090/Neuroscientist-Sex-differences-crucial-in-evaluating-medicationlast_img read more

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