Intelligence

first_imgCAPTION: German diesel engine manufacturer MTU has repowered this Russian-built Class TU7 loco for Vietnam Railways with a 12V 183 engine; further power units have been supplied for conversion of seven more TU7s and 15 Romanian-built D11HsCAPTION: China’s Dalian locomotive works has rolled out the first of 50 Class 2101 diesel locos for Nigerian Railway Corp; four of the 2 400 hp 1 067 mm gauge locos were delivered in January, with six more following in Marchlast_img

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Netherlands roundup: ABP to appeal over military pension ruling

first_imgIt warned there was a risk of paying incorrect pensions and insufficient clarity about future benefits if the pension fund had to continue the final salary plan for military personnel.Recently, the unions said they would lodge an appeal against the employer – the Dutch State – demanding that military staff continue accruing pensions under final salary arrangements “as the social partners had not yet reached an agreement about another pension plan”.The unions’ decision was triggered by the verdict in summary proceedings of a court in The Hague, which judged that average salary agreements should apply as the social partners, including the unions, had agreed to this.Regulator to focus on communication from schemes facing cutsDutch communication supervisor Autoriteit Financiële Markten (AFM) is to focus on whether pension funds that have to apply rights cuts in 2020 correctly inform their members.In its supervisory agenda for 2019, AFM said it wanted to protect vulnerable consumers against financial problems.Members must have the financial means at retirement they expected as a result of solid information, effective guidance around options, and suitable matching products, the regulator said.Pension funds must legally inform their participants in a correct, clear, timely and balanced way.AFM said it would also check whether pension funds correctly applied new rules regarding improved defined contribution plans, which allows for a drawdown pension.The regulator added that it would look for inconsistencies in the pension claims communicated to members by the pension providers.The large metal schemes PMT (€72bn) and PME (€47bn) could be subject to the AFM’s supervisory priorities, as they are facing rights cuts in 2020 if their funding is short of the minimum required level of 104.3% at the end of this year. At November-end, the funding levels of PMT and PME were 102.5% and 101.6%, respectively.AFM also indicated that it would dedicate resources to providing clarity about the effects of Brexit for Dutch financial companies involved in trading equity, bonds and derivatives. The €409bn Dutch civil service scheme ABP is to appeal against the verdict of an Amsterdam court in summary proceedings brought by trade unions about a switch from final to average salary arrangements for military staff.On its website, the pension fund explained that, by forbidding ABP to communicate in terms of final and average salary, the court had in effect blocked the scheme from providing the Ministry of Defence (MoD) personnel with information to which they were entitled. It said it would not be able to inform the MoD staff in the legally prescribed “correct, clear and balanced” way about their pension or answer questions.Responding to the court’s conclusion that ABP had only to blame itself for implementation problems, the pension fund argued that the court had underestimated the complexity of the plan and the IT challenges it posed.last_img read more

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New LNG Carrier for NYK, Tokyo Gas Named at JMU Shipyard

first_imgEnergy Glory, a new LNG carrier for NYK and Tokyo Gas, has been named at the Tsu shipyard, part of Japan Marine United Corporation (JMU), in Japan.NYK and Tokyo LNG Tanker, a subsidiary of Tokyo Gas, have a long-term charter contract for this vessel.The 122,800-ton Energy Glory is the third ship to be jointly owned by NYK (30%) and Tokyo LNG Tanker (70%).Following its delivery, the newbuilding will be mainly used over the next 20 years for LNG transportation from the Cove Point LNG project in the United States.This new carrier is equipped with an SPB design that allows for robust propulsion and reduced fuel consumption and comes with a tri-fuel diesel electric propulsion system that can use low-sulfur fuel oil. The ship will thus be able to mitigate environmental burdens.With a cargo tank capacity of 165,000 cubic meters, Energy Glory features a length of 299.9 meters and a width of 48.9 meters. Currently, it has a market value of USD 189.01 million, according to data provided by VesselsValue.last_img read more

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Nauticor: Kairos wraps up 100th LNG bunkering

first_imgHamburg-based Nauticor, a Linde Group Company said that the world’s largest bunker supply vessel (BSV) for liquefied natural gas (LNG) Kairos conducted its 100th LNG bunker supply operation.This milestone was achieved during a bunkering operation for the product tanker Gaia Desgagnes at anchorage in front of the Swedish island Gotland, Nauticor said in its statement.The operation was completed ten months after Kairos conducted its first LNG bunkering operation for the LNG-fuelled ferry Visborg at Gotland.The receiving vessel Gaia Desgagnes, built in 2018 as Fure Vinga and currently managed by the tanker pool of the Gothia Tanker Alliance, received 140 tons of LNG, while on her way from Immingham, United Kingdom, to St. Petersburg, Russia.Like several LNG bunkering operations before, the operation was conducted under an LNG supply agreement, which was signed by Furetank Rederi, a member of the Gothia Tanker Alliance, and Nauticor in 2018.Commenting on the milestone operation, Lars Höglund, managing director of Furetank, said, “Having conducted the first LNG bunkering operation with Kairos in April 2018, we are glad to see that since then the availability of LNG has improved significantly and that the availability of the environmentally-friendly fuel is no longer a hurdle in most of the areas we operate in, including the Baltic Sea.”With this LNG supply infrastructure in place, a variety of companies, including Furetank and Nauticor, are already working on taking the next steps, including the use of liquefied bio gas (LBG) and synthetic LNG (SNG), which have even greater potential to reduce emissions, the statement reads.last_img read more

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Government launches new identity theft investigative tool

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — In late June the United States Federal Trade Commission enacted a web-based reporting, and tracking system from those who have fallen victim to Identity Theft.  This website, simply titled www.identitytheft.gov is the federal government’s one-stop resource for identity theft victims to report the crime to the Federal Trade Commission and to get recovery help.  The website asks victims about the identity theft.  Based on the answers, the site will:Build a personal recovery plan and walk the victim through each recovery step.Create an Identity Theft Report that victims can use in place of a Police Report in most cases. This report helps clear their credit reports of fraudulent information.Generate personalized letters and forms that victims can send to debt collectors, credit agencies, and others to help resolve the identity theft.IdentityTheft.gov has detailed recovery steps for more than 30 types of identity theft.The Franklin County Sheriff’s Department is urging all that have fallen victim to Identity Theft to visit www.identitytheft.gov and follow the simple steps to begin reporting and recovery.last_img read more

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Final 2013 IMCA National Point Standings

first_imgOfficial 2013 IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point StandingsIMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modifieds – 1. William Gould, Calera, Okla., 1,233; 2. Jesse Sob­bing, Glenwood, Iowa, 1,232; 3. Keith White, Little River Academy, Texas, 1,225; 4. Zane DeVil­biss, Farmington, N.M., 1,221; 5. Ricky Thornton Jr., Chandler, Ariz., 1,196; 6. Chris Fleming, Union Springs, N.Y., 1,186; 7. Chris Abelson, Sioux City, Iowa, 1,182 (14 40-point feature wins); 8. Jeremy Frenier, Fort Morgan, Colo., 1,182 (11 40-point feature wins); 9. Kevan Cook, Constan­tia, N.Y., 1,179; 10. Dylan Smith, Osceola, Neb., 1,178; 11. Ronn Lauritzen, Jesup, Iowa, 1,170; 12. Brandon Beckendorf, Danube, Minn., 1,168; 13. Corey Lagroon, Salina, Kan., 1,165; 14. Josh McGaha, Abilene, Texas, 1,160; 15. Jimmy Gustin, Marshalltown, Iowa, 1,149; 16. Matthew Rob­erts, Afton, N.Y., 1,143; 17. Tommy Fain, Abilene, Texas, 1,141 (six 40-point feature wins); 18. Mark Schulte, Delhi, Iowa 1,141 (one 40-point feature win); 19. Cayden Carter, Oskaloosa, Iowa, 1,140; 20. Nate Moore, Colby, Kan., 1,138. IMCA Eagle Motorsports RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. John Ricketts, Burleson, Texas, 793 (10 40-point feature wins); 2. Jeb Sessums, Burleson, Texas, 793 (seven 40-point feature wins); 3. Chad Wilson, North Richland Hills, Texas, 737; 4. Jason Howell, Fort Worth, Texas, 733; 5. Dustin Woods, Forney, Texas, 725; 6. Justin Fifield, Mesquite, Texas, 722; 7. Herbert R. Wood, Kennedale, Texas, 702; 8. Chase Brewer, Springtown, Texas, 665; 9. Shane Gloeckler, Joshua, Texas, 643; 10. Brett Allen, Gaylord, Minn., 634; 11. Michael Stien, Ceylon, Minn., 631; 12. D.J. Estes, Mansfield, Texas, 621; 13. Mark Klis, Waxahachie, Texas, 617; 14. Mike Boston, Alvo, Neb., 605; 15. Colby Estes, Mansfield, Texas, 595; 16. Aaron Wisch, Arlington, Minn., 585; 17. Ed Keaton, Midlothian, Texas, 581; 18. Ron Guentzel, St. Peter, Minn., 576; 19. Jeremy Schultz, Hutchinson, Minn., 558; 20. Terry Richards, Denton, Neb., 551. IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. Brandon Czarapata, Appleton, Wis., 1,232; 2. Matt Guillaume, Haslet, Texas, 1,224; 3. Gabe Tucker, Carbon, Texas, 1,216; 4. Jeff Tubbs, Colby, Kan., 1,214; 5. John J. Heinz, Green Bay, Wis., 1,208; 6. Mike Nichols, Harlan, Iowa, 1,207; 7. Jason Batt, Harker Heights, Texas, 1,204; 8. David Smith, Lake City, Iowa, 1,196; 9. Donavon Smith, Lake City, Iowa, 1,190; 10. Abe Huls, Carthage, Ill., 1,187; 11. Damon Murty, Chelsea, Iowa, 1,185; 12. Dan Mackenthun, Hamburg, Minn., 1,183; 13. John Emerson, Waterloo, Iowa, 1,180; 14. Jay Schmidt, Tama, Iowa, 1,175; 15. Jason Cook, Mount Pleasant, Iowa, 1,166; 16. Lance Borgman, Beatrice, Neb., 1,165; 17. Luke Sathoff, Jackson, Minn., 1,160; 18. Casey Werkmeister, North Platte, Neb., 1,158; 19. Nathan Wood, Sigourney, Iowa, 1,153; 20. Derek Green, Granada, Minn., 1,152. IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Devin Smith, Lake City, Iowa, 1,240; 2. Shannon Anderson, Urbandale, Iowa, 1,234; 3. Jason Wilkinson, Neligh, Neb., 1,231; 4. Justin Luinenburg, Reading, Minn., 1,200; 5. Andy Roller, Waco, Texas, 1,196; 6. Chris Luloff, Independence, Iowa, 1,187; 7. Tiffany Bittner, Norfolk, Neb., 1,182; 8. Cory Gansen, Clear Lake, Iowa, 1,180; 9. Eric Stanton, Hartford, Iowa, 1,177; 10. Cody Graham, Hays, Kan., 1,176; 11. Brock Beeter, Minot, N.D., 1,173; 12. Jeremy Oliver, Chilton, Texas, 1,172 (11 40-point feature wins); 13. Bill Bonnett, Knoxville, Iowa, 1,172 (five 40-point feature wins); 14. Benji Irvine, Cedar Falls, Iowa, 1,171; 15. Jason Kohl, Missouri Valley, Iowa, 1,165; 16. Brian Stich, Topeka, Kan., 1,164; 17. Brandon Beeter, Minot, N.D., 1,162; 18. Brian Happel, Van Horne, Iowa, 1,154; 19. Roy Armstrong, Beatrice, Neb., 1,147 (10 40-point feature wins); 20. Kenny Champ, Clarinda, Iowa, 1,147 (eight 40-point feature wins).Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods – 1. Matthew Looft, Swea City, Iowa, 1,235; 2. Kyle Prauner, Norfolk, Neb., 1,233; 3. Tyler Frye, Belleville, Kan., 1,227; 4. Doug Smith, Rockwell City, Iowa, 1,208; 5. Joshua Long, Little Suamico, Wis., 1,204; 6. Tony Dunker, Quincy, Ill., 1,201; 7. Nick Roberts, Des Moines, Iowa, 1,191; 8. Chad Dolan, Gibbon, Neb., 1,185; 9. Carter VanDen­Berg, Oskaloosa, Iowa, 1,179; 10. Joel Rust, Grundy Center, Iowa, 1,168 (12 40-point feature wins); 11. Bryan Herrick, Curtis, Neb., 1,168 (six 40-point feature wins); 12. Eric Elliott, Boone, Iowa, 1,167; 13. Nick Spainhoward, Bakersfield, Calif., 1,165; 14. Cody Hokenstad, Shawano, Wis., 1,160; 15. Danny Dvorak, Vinton, Iowa, 1,153; 16. Clay Sellard, Bucklin, Kan., 1,137; 17. Brett Lowry, Montezuma, Iowa, 1,135; 18. Austin Moyer, Dubuque, Iowa, 1,133 (13 40-point feature wins); 19. Nelson Vollbrecht, Norfolk, Neb., 1,133 (three 40-point feature wins); 20. Clay Money, Penokee, Kan., 1,130.Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center Southern SportMods – 1. Gabe Tucker, Carbon, Texas, 1,230; 2. G.W. Egbert IV, Belton, Texas, 1,205; 3. Dean Abbey, Waco, Texas, 1,197; 4. Jake Upchurch, Grand Prairie, Texas, 1,194; 5. Chad Hertel, Abilene, Texas, 1,154; 6. Brad Shirley, Springtown, Texas, 1,146; 7. Kevin Rutherford, Flower Mound, Texas, 1,126; 8. David Goode Jr., Copperas Cove, Texas, 1,102; 9. Alexander Hickham, Conroe, Texas, 1,087; 10. Kevin Green, Robinson, Texas, 1,086; 11. Brian J. Carey, Aztec, N.M., 1,065; 12. Jarrett Anthony Roberts, Temple, Texas, 1,056; 13. Jon White Jr., Red Oak, Texas, 1,047 (six 40-point feature wins); 14. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 1,047 (no 40-point feature wins); 15. Kyle Lovejoy, Burleson, Texas, 1,042; 16. Michael Newhard, Greenville, Texas, 1,037; 17. Albert McCall, Red Oak, Texas, 1,022; 18. Gauge K. Smith, Roosevelt, Utah, 1,012; 19. T.J. Green, Robinson, Texas, 1,008; 20. Kenny Ware, Belton, Texas, 1,007.Mach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Ramsey Meyer, Pierce, Neb., 1,185; 2. Bill Whalen Jr., Riverside, Iowa, 1,164; 3. Cody Thompson, Sioux City, Iowa, 1,162; 4. Nate Coopman, Mankato, Minn., 1,161; 5. Shannon Pospisil, Norfolk, Neb., 1,129 (six 40-point feature wins); 6. Merv Chandler, Urbana, Iowa, 1,129 (four 40-point feature wins); 7. Stephanie Forsberg, Slayton, Minn., 1,101; 8. Kimberly Abbott, Camp Point, Ill., 1,099; 9. Shawn Cooney, Des Moines, Iowa, 1,091; 10. Jay DeVries, Spencer, Iowa, 1,088; 11. Austen Becerra, Carthage, Ill., 1,060; 12. John Whalen, Ains­worth, Iowa, 1,058; 13. Michael Reicks, New Hampton, Iowa, 1,048; 14. Brooke Fluckiger, Colum­bus, Neb., 1,035; 15. A.J. Witten, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1,025; 16. Brandon Lambert, Carthage, Ill., 1,011; 17. Kaitlyn DeVries, Spencer, Iowa, 1,007; 18. Patrick Dunker, Ursa, Ill., 990; 19. Scott Brown, Bellevue, Neb., 989; 20. Gabe Barclay, Hubbard, Neb., 969.West Coast Super Stocks – 1. Jason Pike, Pahrump, Nev., 726; 2. Clifton King Jr., Pahrump, Nev., 607; 3. Eric Shenberger, Pahrump, Nev., 522; 4. Lonnie Welch, Bakersfield, Calif., 488; 5. Gary Dutton, Bakersfield, Calif., 434; 6. Tim Randolph, Santa Maria, Calif., 426; 7. Joey Claborn, Santa Maria, Calif., 361; 8. Ray Marroquin, Santa Maria, Calif., 339; 9. Bryan Wulfenstein, Pahrump, Nev., 320; 10. Toby Randolph, Nipomo, Calif., 313; 11. Dusty Park, Pahrump, Nev., 292; 12. Jim Wulfenstein, Pahrump, Nev., 291; 13. Michael Frazier, Santa Maria, Calif., 280; 14. Chad Weber, Santa Maria, Calif., 278; 15. Rob Gilbertson, Santa Maria, Calif., 258; 16. Steve Nash, Pahrump, Nev., 244; 17. Chad Shaffer, Santa Maria, Calif., 230; 18. Anthony DeBiase, Pahrump, Nev., 220; 19. Billy Simkins, Bakersfield, Calif., 203; 20. Joe Wabsis, Pahrump, Nev., 196.last_img read more

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Interfaith gathering reflects on election

first_imgStudents from different religious groups came together to share prayers of healing for the upcoming presidential election during a nonpartisan event held in the USC Caruso Catholic Center courtyard on Monday evening.The event was sponsored by the USC Interfaith Council and the Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, The Church of Latter Day Saints Student Association, USC Muslim Student Union, Crusaders for Christ, Secular Student Fellowship, USC Hillel, Hindu Student Organization and the Sikh Student Association each selected a representative to give a prayer. The Foundation for Ethnic Understanding’s Walter Ruby opened the prayer session. His organization is a New York-based nonprofit that brings together peoples of all faiths, specifically Jews and Muslims. “We are urging students to come together and stand up for each other in the face of bigotry and hatred that has come up in the elections,” Ruby said. “We’re going to be here for each other no matter what happens tomorrow.”Mary Cate Hickman, the president of the USC Interfaith Council and staff writer for the Daily Trojan, said that because USC has the most religious organizations in the nation, she wanted to give everyone the opportunity to express their faith.“I didn’t want it to be an interfaith event with just Christians because that’s so not representative of our campus,” Hickman said. “I was very vigilant in making sure that they were all here.” Hannah Maluyao, from the non-denominational Crusaders for Christ group, prayed there would be honesty in the election process and the right person would become president.“Would you help us to uphold justice, would you stand for those who are oppressed and would you help us to ensure that we treat one another fairly,” Maluyao said in prayer.Some prayers advocated for everyone to overcome hatred and bigotry, not only in the US election, but around the globe. Nimarta Singh and Sehej Singh from the Sikh Student Association translated a prayer into English, which said “when my lord accepted my prayer, the entire world became stress free and full of peace and love.”Mohamed el Farra, representing the Muslim Student Union, chose a prayer that he felt appropriately addressed the decision that America faces today. He recited the prayer in Arabic before translating it into English. “Relent towards us, thou art the relenting and the merciful, and make us grateful for thy blessing and make us praise it while accepting it and give it to us in full,” el Farra said.Toward the middle of the event, those in attendance held a brief moment of silence and lit candles to reflect in their own prayers and thoughts.To bring together people of all walks of life, the Interfaith Council hosted a representative from the Secular Student Fellowship. While Dylan McKeithe, a senior majoring in physics and a secular humanist, did not pray, he gave a brief speech that touched on overall human nature and how it relates to the election.“Humans, though they may strive to be, are not rational beings and we are rationalizing beings,” McKeithe said. “We make emotional decisions and come out with a rationale that supports it afterward.”Paulina Nuñez, a freshman majoring in sociology, attended the prayer because she realized that the correct choice of president can only be made by a united front.“It should be important to everyone to get together and make sure that the person that we chose tomorrow is someone that will bring good not only to our personal life, but everyone in general,” Nuñez said.Each prayer fit into the overall message of healing, forgiving and letting the singular God as well as multiple gods determine the outcome of the election.last_img read more

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USC looking to continue winning streak against Arizona schools

first_imgAfter a weekend sweep of the Washington schools, the No. 17 Women of Troy (11-4-3, 4-2-1) ride a three-game winning streak into the desert, concluding conference play against Arizona State tonight at 6 p.m. (8-6-3, 2-4-1) and Arizona (5-11-2, 1-6) on Sunday at 10 a.m.Following their final two games of Pac-10 play, the Women of Troy head back home to await their postseason fate on Monday when the 2010 NCAA bracket is revealed at 1:30 p.m. on ESPNU.“You want to go into the end of the season with some momentum,” said USC coach Ali Khosroshahin. “Arizona State and Arizona are two tough teams. We have two tough games on the road this weekend and if we take care of business, we’ll be in pretty good shape going into the tournament.”Controller · Junior midfielder Ashli Sandoval passes the ball against UCLA. Sandoval has been an integral part of USC’s offense this season. – Tim Tran | Daily Trojan Even the players recognized the significance of this last road trip, especially because the last two games away from home ended in a tie and a loss to the Oregon schools respectively.“We’re just trying to focus on playing our game and being together as a unit,” senior defender Karter Haug said. “We just have to play like we did against the Washington [schools] and UCLA.”As one of three seniors on the team, Haug stepped up her game last weekend against the Washington schools, scoring a game-winning goal and assisting on three goals, all while anchoring a backline that has recorded three consecutive shutouts.Haug was recognized for her contributions as she was awarded with USC’s first Pac-10 Player of the Week honor and also the first in her career.“Karter has been the backbone of our backline with all the different changes that have happened there,” Khosroshahin said. “She’s been the one steady presence in the back so it’s nice for her to get recognized for her play.”With different changes occurring in the rotation, one notable change for the rest of the season will be the absence of redshirt freshman forward Morgan Morrow, who was injured over the weekend.The coaching staff believes she is likely done for the season, but Khosroshahin said he isn’t too worried, as the play of redshirt junior midfielder Ashli Sandoval has provided a steady presence for the backline.“You make the adjustments and move forward,” Khosroshahin said. “Sandoval has [been great]. She is very intelligent about the game and she has amazing skills so it’s second nature for her.”But with all that has happened this year, the Women of Troy still control their own destiny and are in line to qualify for the NCAA Tournament, assuming they close out Pac-10 play on a high note.“At this point, I’m hoping they know what they need to do,” Khosroshahin said. “This is a test before our ultimate test.”last_img read more

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15 years after arriving at Syracuse, Gerry McNamara still beloved in hometown

first_imgUPDATED: Dec. 5, 2017 at 12:16 a.m.SCRANTON, Pa. — Tucked inside the home in which Gerry McNamara grew up, on West Market Street in North Scranton, the former Syracuse star’s parents stood up from their kitchen table and looked at each other.“Do you know where they could be?” McNamara’s mother, Joyce, asked.“Probably dusty up in the attic,” said his father, Gerard. “If I don’t find it in 30 seconds, I won’t find it at all.”Gerard sighed. Neither he nor his wife knew exactly where any artifact from their son’s magical career at Syracuse could be. There was not a single photograph, jersey or trophy of Gerry in the living or dining rooms of his childhood home. Not a magnet on the refrigerator, poster on the wall or lanyard on their keys. There are no items connected to McNamara’s playing days, no reminder of how McNamara grew into a basketball star from Northeast Pennsylvania.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textA couple of minutes passed and Gerard came up with a framed photograph of Gerry at SU. In the photo, McNamara clenches his fists, blood streaks from his forehead, down the side of his nose and into his right eye. It was during the Orange’s 68-56 comeback victory over Oklahoma State in the second round of the 2003 NCAA Tournament. Syracuse went on to win the national title that year, when McNamara started as a freshman.Other than that, there is little mark of McNamara’s status in his childhood home. His former bedroom is now a playroom of sorts for his children, nieces and nephews. His high school, Bishop Hannan, graduated its last class in 2007 and has closed down. The gymnasium where he would take hundreds of shots after high school basketball practices, at the Holy Rosary Center, is just down the street from his childhood home and hasn’t changed. Cracks remain in the pavement out front.But most everywhere else in Scranton, the legend lives on for one of the area’s most recognizable figures. McNamara has transformed little since he arrived at Syracuse and neither has the landscape around him. An assistant coach at his alma mater since 2011, he still owns a firm place in the heart of his hometown, by current high school players, business owners and longtime residents alike.McNamara gained fame in Scranton. Fifteen years after he arrived on the Syracuse campus, his legend has not faded.“His legacy will live forever here,” said Bob Timlin, who worked as a referee during McNamara’s high school games and visited the Carrier Dome to see him play. “He’s still well talked about. He raised the bar for all of these high-school players here, who say they want to be like G-Mac. Everybody is trying to be the next Gerry McNamara, because at 6-foot-1, he put his head down, went to the gym every day and became a star.” After he led Bishop Hannan to a state title as a high school senior, McNamara arrived at SU alongside fellow freshman Carmelo Anthony. McNamara had already etched his name in Scranton history by winning the Catholic Youth Organization title as an eighth grader. He started on varsity as a freshman in high school, before earning a starting spot at SU in his first year. Scranton rallied around McNamara when he arrived to Syracuse.For most Syracuse home games during McNamara’s career, about 3,000 fans packed more than 60 buses, received a police escort out of town and rode two hours north on Interstate 81 to the Carrier Dome. McNamara came to represent the blue-collar City of Scranton, a population of roughly 75,000 in 2003. Approximately one of every 25 Scranton residents left for the games. Locals joked that during Syracuse games the banks in Scranton were vulnerable for robbery because many residents were in the Carrier Dome.Stirna’s Restaurant, which sits only a few blocks down West Market Street from McNamara’s home, transformed from family dining restaurant to sports bar during his playing years, said owner Cathy Gavin. And even now, a pair of McNamara jerseys hang on display. A picture of a newspaper cover featuring McNamara lies on the menu.“People come in with G-Mac jerseys, even now, to watch the games,” Gavin said. “It’s little Syracuse here. Our hometown young man is still there and playing a key role.”Last year, a Tully’s Good Times opened up in Clarks Summit, just outside of Scranton on I-81. The establishment devoted a photo display to McNamara, featuring his No. 3 jersey along with game photos.There’s a cutout of McNamara playing at the entrance of Freddy Battaglia’s Goods, a sporting goods store on Wyoming Avenue. The store sold hundreds of McNamara shirts during his years at SU, and head coach Jim Boeheim’s wife, Juli, made frequent visits to pick up shirts for friends, family and her children.“He’s loved much more at home in Scranton,” said Gerry’s older brother, Tim. “He’s not as impressed with himself as other people. He’s pretty low-key, humble guy. But his name still resonates with a lot of people, especially in Scranton. For that four years, for so many people, their social calendar revolved around Syracuse basketball.”Matthew Gutierrez | Senior Staff WriterTim recalled a late-night trip to a local Walmart, where he and Gerry went to buy fishing gear for a trip early the next morning. They both loved to fish, and Gerry still does. When they walked into the store, Tim said, an excited employee called Gerry’s name over the store loudspeaker.“Man, we can’t take you anywhere,” joked his teammate at Bishop Hannan, Brian Coyle.Coyle, currently the head men’s basketball coach at Lackawanna College in Scranton, played one season with McNamara at Bishop Hannan. They are still close friends. Coyle said that during his Lackawanna practices, he “always brings up stories about how the city supports Gerry.” He was among the thousands that made the bus trips up north, Coyle has told his players, and he reminds them of Gerry, the “guy who was relentless in the gym.” Coyle said he still spots young kids wearing “G-Mac” jerseys at local games.“People went to the games that hadn’t gone to basketball games in 35 years,” said Patrick Connors, one of Gerry’s uncles. “Driving around (Scranton), I’d always see all of these kids playing in their backyard with No. 3 on their back for Gerry. Even on occasion today.”After high school games, McNamara signed autographs for nearly an hour. His coach, John Bucci, made him a four-year starter and quickly learned that he was the best player in the program — as a freshman. During a summer camp Bucci ran, when Gerry was still in high school, a young boy asked if Gerry could visit his birthday party. Gerry attended, which made him a hero among those young players, Bucci said.“He was fiercely loyal to his community and his community was fiercely loyal to him,” Bucci said. “He was 17 going on 30. He realized how fortunate he was. He embraced their love of him and he gave it back. That’s what made Gerry special. Forget that he put that ball in the basket. Forget the fact that he played at Syracuse. He was loyal to Scranton and to this day he still is. That’s what drew people to him.”Kevin Camelo | Contributing Digital Design EditorOn a recent afternoon, Gerry’s father, Gerard, sat back and chronicled his son’s trail to Syracuse stardom, which began on a 10 by 20-foot pavement in the family backyard. Gerard intended for it to be a patio with a roof on top, but he “decided to get the boys a basket.” They played out here forever,” he said, smiling at the place where Gerry honed the shot that instilled fear in opposing defenses.About two months ago, Gerard tossed the original rim and backboard in the garbage because it had worn over the decades. The frame still stands though, offering a reminder of Gerry’s roots, said Gerard, a former Marine and manager at the local post office. He would work out with his son for hours in local gyms.From the kitchen window, which overlooks the backyard, Gerard watched Gerry shoot. To develop his left hand, Gerard recalled that Gerry would put his right arm behind his back. He’d slap the ball with his left hand only. Every bunch of dribbles, the ball hit his foot and trickled down the side of the house. Gerry would run back up with his hand behind his back and start doing it all over again. A drop off from the pavement acted as the backyard’s 3-point shot.“That’s all it is,” Gerard said, gesturing to the pavement. “He was out here all day shooting hoops. It served its purpose.”Matthew Gutierrez | Senior Staff WriterFor many in the community, he was a hero. For many, he still is. While he now lives in central New York with his wife, Katie, his high school sweetheart, along with their four children, McNamara is still rooted in his hometown.“He’ll always be Mr. Scranton,” Bucci said.CORRECTION: In a previous version of this post, Bob Timlin was misnamed. The Daily Orange regrets this error. Comments Published on December 4, 2017 at 9:48 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Judge orders release of dancehall entertainer Tommy Lee Sparta

first_imgUpdate (June 1): Entertainer Tommy Lee Sparta, who was last week detained by the police in Kingston then taken to St James, has been ordered released by St. James Parish Judge Sandria Wong Small.Tommy Lee Sparta, whose real name is Leroy Russell, was detained last Sunday morning in St Andrew at an ATM shortly after he had left the final of the popular Magnum Kings and Queens of Dancehall competition. He was later transferred to St James in relation to organized crime in the parish, according to police. Russell has had run-ins with the law in the past.  Last year, the police said that he was wanted for questioning in relation to ongoing violence in sections of St James. Russell was also listed last year by detectives from the Kingston Eastern division as a person of interest in relation to a shooting in the capital city.*****************************************************A judge in the western parish of St. James on Tuesday ruled that dancehall entertainer Tommy Lee Sparta be released immediately.Following a hearing Tuesday morning, Judge Sandria Wong Small ruled that the entertainer was not properly detained under the State of Emergency.The artiste has been in custody since May 20 after being arrested in the Corporate Area before being transferred to the Freeport police station in the western parish.The police say he was being detained for questioning in relation to several crimes committed in the parish, but his lawyers have complained that the artiste was being targeted unfairly. They also took issue with the arrest and the manner in which it was handled.last_img read more

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